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Society for Social Studies of Science

Invited Session: Reproductive Justice and Injustice

Friday, September 1

Organizer and Chair: Banu Subramaniam

Boston, Massachusetts, has long been a center of activism around reproductive health, rights, and justice. At this historical moment, we have witnessed an explosion of new reproductive techno-possibilities for some, even while individual rights and reproductive autonomy for others have been severely curtailed. With the rise of authoritarian governments across the world we are witnessing renewed assaults on bodily freedoms. The aim of this special Program Committee-sponsored panel is to assess the landscape of reproductive politics and policies today, theorize new frames for reproductive justice, and explore progressive possibilities for the future. We draw on the rich history of Boston to highlight local and global activism.

Panelists:

Khiara Bridges (Boston University, Boston, USA)

Christa Craven (College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, USA)

Dana-ain Davis (Queens College, New York, USA)

Cei Lambert (Fenway Health, Boston, USA)

Susan Yanow (Our Bodies, Ourselves, Boston, USA)

Evelynn Hammonds, Moderator (Harvard University, Cambridge, USA)

Presidential Plenary – Interrogating ‘the Threat’

Wednesday August 30th

The aim of this plenary is to stage a critical conversation regarding what we should be concerned about, as both STS scholars and members of wider publics.  How can we move through the discourses of fear that dominate the framing of contemporary ‘threats’, and re-articulate matters of concern in ways informed by the sensibilities of science and technology studies, as well as by our awareness of their limits?  The panel will consider these questions across domains of settler colonialism and the (post)colonial, (in)security and (anti)militarism,  bio and health politics, race/difference and (im)migration, and multi-species environments, as part of thinking and acting through the dominant narratives into new possibilities.  The session will be organized as more of a roundtable than a series of presentations, affording time for discussion both among the panelists and with the audience.    

Confirmed participants:

Karen Barad (University of California at Santa Cruz, USA)
Steve Epstein (Northwestern University, USA)
Joseph Masco (University of Chicago, USA)
Amade M’charek (University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
Kim Tallbear-Dauphine (University of Alberta, Canada)
Lucy Suchman (Moderator, Lancaster University UK and President of 4S)

Enacting Environmental Data Justice:  A 4S Pre-Meeting Event

Time:  August 29, 4-8pm

Place: Boston TBD

Event Website

The Environmental Data and Governance Initiative (EDGI) invites STS scholars, 4S participants, and Boston-area civic science, environmental justice, and critical data advocates to participate in an experimental workshop titled Enacting Environmental Data Justice. Held on Tuesday, August 29, the evening before the 4S annual meeting begins, this event will explore possibilities for data justice through a framework of environmental justice.

 As the new presidential administration threatens to curtail environmental agencies and their infrastructures of data collection, a powerful grassroots movement has formed to archive and protect federally-maintained datasets and associated curated information. Including the many public data archiving events hosted by EDGI, these efforts have largely sought to maintain existing public resources and establish open data access in the face of efforts to undermine environmental science in the public interest. And yet the work of environmental justice, feminist science studies, and decolonial scholarship also cautions against an uncritical relationship with data, data collection, and data access. Diverse critical STS work on infrastructure, data, and design has much to offer to this conflicting moment when US state research practices are being dismantled, while at the same time projects of simple data preservation risk whitewashing science’s record of entanglement in economic, military, colonial and racist logics. Building from these insights, how can we develop a theoretically robust and politically engaged concept and practice of data justice?

The experimental workshop is designed as an open format with multiple tracks to draw together the heterogenous knowledges and communities. The tracks will be designed with input from participants.  

Some guiding questions are:

  • What are the essential elements of a program to enact environmental data justice?
  • How can tech communities assist to decolonize environmental knowledge?
  • How can specific data resources like the Toxics Release Inventory or other data interfaces be re-imagined to support community organizing objectives?
  • How can environmental fabulations or related playful data projects affect a positive vision for visualizing, communicating or reconceiving environmental relations?
  • How can data justice support science for the people or be used to hold the state accountable?  

Please RSVP here More information and opportunities to join in planning to follow on the EDGI website.

STS Making and Doing

Making and Doing Session Returns for Boston Meetintg

The STS Making and Doing Program aims at encouraging 4S members to share scholarly practices of participation, engagement, and intervention in their fields of study. It highlights scholarly practices for producing and expressing STS knowledge and expertise that extend beyond the academic paper or book. By increasing the extent to which 4S members learn from one another about practices they have developed and enacted, the initiative seeks to improve the effectiveness and influence of STS scholarship beyond the field and/or to expand the modes of STS knowledge production.

In addition to paper and session submissions, the 4S invites proposed presentations for the STS Making and Doing Session. Submissions for Making and Doing presentations are sought during abstract submission season for the Annual Meeting. Selected presentations will be displayed at an exhibition during the meeting.The STS Making and Doing program was premiered at the 2015 4S annual meeting in Denver. View the 2015 presentation summaries here.

Judging for the STS Making and Doing Award takes place during the meeting. This award formally acknowledges and celebrates distinctive achievements in practices of STS making and doing. It recognizes 4S members who have demonstrated scholarly excellence in formulating, enacting, and sharing theoretically-informed practices of participation, engagement, and intervention in their fields of study.

For further information, please contact Sara Wylie <s.wylie@northeastern.edu>.

Open Panel Titles

Use menu at left to view open panel abstracts.

  1. Viewing Cultural Traces of Science and Technology in Africa
  2. Tinkering with Data: Intersections between Critical Data Studies and Digital Methods 
  3. Television as a Contested Site of the Creation of Knowledge and Social Imaginaries
  4. Placebos, Nocebos, and the Contradictions of (In)Sensible Biomedicine
  5. IPBES and Sensing the Politics of Biodiversity
  6. Feminist STS Analyses of Reproductive Medicine, Technologies, and Practices
  7. Making Sense of Conferences
  8. Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Technocence: STS meets World-Ecology
  9. Sensibilities and Responsibilities in Research and Innovation (withdrawn)
  10. Science out of Comfort:  Ethics as an Act of Violence
  11. “Hidden Disasters”: Unexposed Element(s) of Sociotechnical Accidents 
  12. Racism and Health: In/sensibility of Embodied Inequality and Inclusion
  13. Sensing Robots 
  14. Booms, Buzzes and Busts in Science and Technology Studies
  15. Cold War Science, Technology, and Policy: The Americas in a Global Perspective
  16. Exploring Prediction: Fortunetelling, Prognostication, and Futurism
  17. Contested Meatspace(s): Cultured Meat, Cellular Agriculture and the Futures of Foods
  18. Frontiers of Climate Change and Extinction: Rendering Worlds Familiar and Strange
  19. Getting Past Inevitablist Despair:  On Guerilla and Action EthoEcologies
  20. Can Improved Science and Technology Mean Progress? More Intelligently Steering Technoscientific Systems
  21. Democracy, Science, and Technology
  22. The Ethnographic Effect: Imagining a Next Generation of Methodological Possibilities
  23. (Non)Sense-making in/of Neural Sciences and Technologies
  24. Cryo (In)Sensibilities: Reproduction in the Age of Ice
  25. The Poetics of Denial: Knowledge-making and Expertise in a “Post-fact” Era
  26. Academic Evaluation in an Age of "Post truth"
  27. Interspecies Sensibilities
  28. Citizen Science: Beyond the Laboratory
  29. Community Informatics and Science and Technology Studies
  30. From Disruption to Obstruction: Race, Gender, Economics, and Other (In)sensibilities of Edtech
  31. Making Nothing: Institutional Practices of Producing Absence
  32. Engaging Material Insensibilities and their Political Effects: What Feminist Materialisms Can Contribute
  33. Dynamics of Knowledge: Bioeconomy and Health
  34. Building Bridges for Innovation: Improving Public-private Relationships (withdrawn)
  35. Making Sense of Climate Policy
  36. Making Sense of Political Calculations
  37. Necropolitics
  38. Side-effects of (In)Sensible Participatory Technology Developments
  39. STS and Law in the Public Health Hazards of Industrial East Asia
  40. Visual (In)Sensibilities
  41. STS after Truth: Narrative, Translation, and Advocacy
  42. What is ‘(Un)making’ STS Ethnographies? Reflections (Not Exclusively) from Latin America
  43. “Would you recommend this shoulder surgery to your friends and family?” The Effect of Online Feedback and Ratings on Health Care Service Provision and Perception.
  44. Making Sense of Autonomous Technologies, 40 Years Later
  45. Academic Careers: Gaining Independence in Different National Contexts
  46. Transhumanism: Critical STS Engagements
  47. Institutional Theory and Large Technical Systems
  48. Citizen/Netizen Empowerment and the Korean Candlelight Revolution: Roots and Significance
  49. Precision Medicine, Race/ethnicity, and Public Health in Comparative Perspectives
  50. Can the Subaltern Research?
  51. Science from the Eyes of Local Cultures and Communities
  52. STS and the Design of Dying, Death and the Afterlife
  53. Social Studies of Politics: What Do We Care For?
  54. Technologies as Rubble? Destabilizing Narratives of Progress
  55. STS (In)sensibilities and Health Professions Education
  56. Science, Technology, and Sport
  57. Sensitizing STS Analyses of Autism Spectrum Disorder
  58. Science and Technology Perspectives on Complementary and Alternative Medicine 
  59. Sensing the Liveliness of Things and the Fragility of Life: Bringing Care and Maintenance Together
  60. Bestial Technoscience: Nonhuman Animals as Technology and in Scientific Practice
  61. Interrogating Food Science and Technology: Green Revolutions, Grey Zones, and Black Boxes
  62. Sounding Worlds:  Listening as Transformative STS
  63. The (In)dependence of Research(ers): Good? Bad? Necessary?
  64. Craft as Practises of Knowledge Making
  65. Predictability's Promises: Knowing Futures, Practicing Presents
  66. Making Sense of Practice by Engagement
  67. Artificial Intelligence: Mediating Coexistence
  68. Technoscience Rent
  69. Cripping Feminist Technoscience
  70. Tensions and Challenges for Environmental Citizen Science
  71. Gender in Academia: Past, Present, and Future
  72. Studying Data Critically: Epistemologies of Data-driven Knowledge Production
  73. Interdisciplinarity and Universities
  74. Technological Innovation, Primary Healthcare and Social Justice
  75. Plasticity, Postgenomics, and the Politics of Possibility: Critical Reflections on the Environmental Turn in the Life Sciences
  76. Sociotechnical Approaches to Privacy and Data Protection
  77. STS, Critical Design, and the Critical Digital Humanities
  78. Historical (In)Sensibilities 
  79. Island Imaginaries: From Repositories to Experimental Labs 
  80. STEM Education: Conservative Restoration and Neoliberal Retrenchment
  81. Public Health and Zika: A War on Environmental Ethics?
  82. What does the Smart Office Know?
  83. Theorizing Harm
  84. If Not Now Then When: STS and Critical Race Theory
  85. Sense and Nonsense in Modern Mathematics
  86. The Agenda(s) of Open Science
  87. STS in Practice
  88. In the making, On the move: Global Perspectives on Technology Appropriation
  89. Feelings and Doubt in Technoscience
  90. Crisis Infrastructures and the Politics of Interdependence
  91. The Ends of the Nervous System
  92. Smart yet (in)Sensible? Feminist Critical Perspectives on “Smart Cities”
  93. Security in the Anthropocene: The Peripheries of Order
  94. Drs. Mom and Dad: Patient and Caregiver Expertise and the Reconfiguration of Medical Authority
  95. Transdisciplinary Research: Transforming Sensibilities and/or Making Usable Knowledge?
  96. Visualizing Security: Remote Sensing, Visualization Technologies and the Making of Risk and (In)securities
  97. Sensing Technologies and Global Politics
  98. Breaking Codes: Technologies from a Gender Perspective
  99. Persistent Polluters and their Opponents 30 Years after Woburn
  100. Governing Future Possibilities: Telecommunications Policy and Law as Sense-making
  101. Clashing Environments in Latin America
  102. Dissemination, Disembodiment, Diversity: Science and Technology in a Post-Truth World
  103. Indigenous Knowledges and Technologies 
  104. Shaping the Human-Technology Frontier
  105. Articulating the Sensibilities of Social Media
  106. Sense and Sensibility: Science and Religion in a Secular Age
  107. Social and Solidarity Economies
  108. Limits of "Infrastructure"
  109. Analyzing Race as a Ghost Variable in Human Research
  110. The Politics of Deficit Construction
  111. Entangled Sciences of Gender, Sexuality, Race: Latin American Issues
  112. Citizen Science Politics and Practices
  113. Emerging Technologies and Conservation
  114. Biolegalities in Globalization: Investigating Ethical In/sensibilities
  115. Beyond Identification: Biometrics and the Governance of Social Life
  116. Bodies, Technologies, and In/Sensibilities in Movement
  117. Studying Science Communication
  118. Life and Death of Partnerships in Research and Innovation
  119. Sacred Sensibilities: Spirit meets Matter
  120. The Politics of Forensic Identification in the Wake of Disaster and Atrocity
  121. Working at the Edges:  Migrants, Women, and Minorities in Technosciences 
  122. Property Matters
  123. Affect and Emotion across Sites of Technoscience
  124. The Sensibilities of East Asian STS: Strategies, Trajectories, and Visions
  125. Synthetic Actors: Drones, Robots and Algorithms as Sensible Interaction Partners
  126. Techno-Jobs and Capital
  127. ‘Make Do and Mend’: How to Prepare for a “Post-Solar Flare Future” with and by Collaborative Practices
  128. Can AI "Do science?"
  129. Internationalizing Science and Technology

Open Panel Topics 67-99

67. Artificial Intelligence: Mediating Coexistence

Organized by: Dora Kaufman, Universidade de Sao Paulo  

The advent of Artificial Intelligence (AI) constitutes the most relevant appropriation of technologies in the contemporary world. "Intelligence" has historically been an exclusive attribute of humans. With AI emerges nonhuman entities endowed with intelligence, in some cases, superior to human intelligence itself. For the first time in history, humans have created something over which they have no control. Experts cannot predict exactly how AI works and how it will behave in the future, leading to the idea of "risk" in AI. From an ethical point of view, two main themes stand out: (a) human control over intelligent systems; and (b) intelligent systems vs human values (moral learning, machine ethics). From these two major themes derive other sub-themes, such as: (i) the sense of anthropocentric perspective; (ii) the viability of intelligent systems that learn human attributes such as consciousness and intuition; (iii) the feasibility of intelligent system autonomy and the maintenance of human control; (iv) the challenge of dealing with the complex system unpredictability; (v) the meaning and threats of a "super intelligence”; (vi) the division of functions in the future society; and (vii) the role of government, the private sector and academia (terms of collaboration). Related to the conference theme emerges the question of how to connect human sensitivity with the "sensitivity" of intelligent machines. This panel invites submissions on how we can theorize and mediate this coexistence.

68. Technoscience Rent

Organized by: Kean Birch, York University

As an increasing number of 'things' (e.g. infrastructure, student debt, medical care, personal data, sunlight, etc.) are turned into assets, it is necessary to work out how value is appropriated from those assets through new forms of 'rentiership' (or rent-seeking). Often presented as the dark side of innovation and entrepreneurship, rent-seeking comes in many forms, including: government fiat (e.g. GHG emissions); monopoly (e.g. intellectual property); organizational arrangements (e.g. business models); and market configurations (e.g. value chains and networks). It is necessary, however, to move beyond the assumptions built into both Marxist and neoclassical economic literatures that rent-seeking is a problematic activity that distorts or corrupts the ‘naturalized’ working of capitalism or free markets. Instead, the purpose of this open panel is to consider these different forms of rentiership as they relate to different forms of technoscience in order to unpack the concept analytically and empirically and its relevance to science, technology, and innovation politically and normatively. The panel welcomes papers on different forms of rentiership in technoscience, different conceptions of rentiership drawing on Marxist, neoclassical, and other traditions, and discussions of the analytical, political, and normative usefulness of rentiership as a concept.

69. Cripping Feminist Technoscience

Organized by: Kelly Fritsch, University of Toronto; Aimi Hamraie, Vanderbilt University

 

Science and technology studies charts the active production of scientific knowledge and technological worlds through the entanglement of material, social, political, economic, and historical forces. While not always engaging with the concept of “technoscience,” scholars of critical, feminist, and crip disability studies often build on the foundational claim of disability studies that natural and built environments are constructed rather than given, offering a critical perspective on the ways science and technology shape the expression, enactment, or elimination of disability, impairment, and illness. As a growing number of scholars are engaging with the emergent field of crip and feminist technoscience studies, we seek presentations that map some of the central nodes of the field of crip technoscience. We foreground crip theory as that which marks disability as a desirable and generative social, political, and material phenomenon, countering normative expectations for embodiments, behaviors, and onto-epistemologies. Through crip theory, we emphasize the mobilization of difference and embodiment, and we seek to engage rather than eschew technoscience, politicizing the relationships, activisms, and products of technoscientific practices. In this panel we invite papers that theorize the following: how does crip technoscience highlight the ways that disability, impairment, chronic conditions, illness, madness, Deafness, neurodiversity (among other crip ways of being) shape our practices, ontologies, and epistemologies?

70. Tensions and Challenges for Environmental Citizen Science

Organized by: Aya Kimura, Univ. Hawaii-Manoa; Abby Kinchy

Citizen science is at the heart of many of today’s environmental controversies. Natural scientists have also shown tremendous interest in using citizens to generate data, and many people are excited about participating in gamified, crowd-sourced, big data collection. STS scholarship has typically applauded these efforts because they make science more participatory, providing an example of the democratization of science, or, at least, more equitable engagement between experts and the lay public. However, citizen science may or may not produce knowledge that is useful to environmental activists. Additionally, the degree to which citizen science can help communities to address social inequality, rectify environmental injustice, and produce accountability of government and corporate entities varies depending on broader political and social contexts. This panel seeks presentations from scholars who critically examine how citizen science enhances struggles for social change beyond merely generating data through volunteer participation. We are particularly interested in projects that situate dilemmas and tensions in citizen science in the broader context of colonialism, neoliberalization, globalization, and scientization. For example, citizen science can inadvertently facilitate neoliberal budget cuts in environmental monitoring, further reducing government capacity. Likewise, citizen science can accelerate the “scientization” of environmental issues, reducing complex social and ethical challenges to technical matters.

71. Gender in Academia: Past, Present, and Future

Organized by: Knut H. Sorensen, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Vivian A. Lagesen, NTNU

STS, in particular feminist technoscience studies, has long been concerned with the co-production of gender with various aspects of technoscience, including the analysis of gender (im)balance in technoscientific institutions. This panel calls for papers that analyse gender (im)balance in universities and other scientific organisations to improve the understanding of gender balance dynamics in different contexts. Such dynamics could be explored within specific disciplines, acknowledging the substantial differences within the STEM field, the life sciences as well as the social sciences and the humanities. What kind of disciplinary and/or local cultures stimulate or impede the improvement of gender balance among professors, post docs and PhD students? How is gender co-produced with class, ethnicity, and age? Observations of large variations with respect to gender balance may be seen to challenge feminist technoscience theories that make general claims about gender in/of science. Does this mean that these theories need to be modified? Another important field of inquiry is the role of gender balance with respect to choice of research topics and approaches. Does an improved gender balance change the culture of doing research? Papers addressing the shaping of inclusion instruments and their effects with respect to gender balance among the various kinds of scientific positions are also welcomed. Why may some instruments be more effective than others? In general, papers that converse with STS and feminist technoscience will be given priority.

72. Studying Data Critically: Epistemologies of Data-driven Knowledge Production

Organized by: Laura Noren, New York University; Charlotte Cabasse-Mazel, UC Berkeley; Brittany Fiore-Gartland, UW-Seattle; Stuart Geiger, UC Berkeley

The goal of this track is to continue to deepen and expand the development of critical data studies within STS. STS research has investigated the ontological and epistemological (Craig and Thatcher, 2014; Kitchin and Lauriault, 2014; Leonelli, 2015), social, ethical, philosophical, and sociotechnical (Neff and Fiore-Gartland, 2015; Seaver, 2015; Beer) consequences of the emergence of data and computational practices as processes of contemporary knowledge production. This panel track invites scholars who are investigating the epistemological challenges that data scientific processes of knowledge production present to more established applications of scientific methods. We invite papers that investigate how data science is augmenting, subverting, inverting, and otherwise altering the way knowledge production operates. In particular, we are interested in domains including astrophysicists, genomics/proteomics/precision medicine researchers, neuroscientists, agronomists, ecologists, political scientists, sociologists, business and financial analysts, mathematicians and artificial intelligence researchers. Methodologically, we encourage papers that utilize quantitative and qualitative methods, including standard and trace ethnographic approaches. We invite: 1. Situated case studies of data science in action in particular domains especially the sciences. 2. Efforts to “provincialize” (Chakrabarty, 2007) the current mainstream data/computational narratives and provide space for expansive data discourses. 3. Work that offers a clear articulation of data science studies situated within a Science and Technologies Studies theoretical and empirical context. 4. Methodological considerations of the digital and analog toolbox necessary to conduct multi-sited, trans-disciplinary, humanspace + bitspace research.

 

 

73. Interdisciplinarity and Universities

Organized by: Liudvika Leisyte, University of Arizona; Erin Leahey

Today, interdisciplinarity is on the rise, and is being promoted at multiple levels. The Europe 2020 agenda emphasizes interdisciplinarity to foster cross-cutting and potentially innovative research. National governments increasingly orient themselves towards addressing societal challenges like aging and global warming. Universities are funding cross-department research initiatives (Biancani, McFarland, Dahlander, & Owens, 2012) and supporting the development of interdisciplinary research centers or institutes (Berman, 2012). Despite policy enthusiasm for interdisciplinarity, systematic investigation of both its rise and its effects has been limited. There has been little empirical research on the link between university policies and interdisciplinary engagement (Jacobs & Frickel, 2009). There is even less research that shows if and how these policies and practices at university level influence university as well as individual productivity. This panel addresses this link between interdisciplinarity and universities as organizations by pursuing the following questions: How do supra-national and national research policy arrangements promote structural change towards interdisciplinarity at universities? How can university engagement in, and commitment to, interdisciplinarity be measured? How do universities promote interdisciplinarity in their own institutions? Why are some universities more highly committed to interdisciplinarity than others? How do individual academics respond to interdisciplinary initiatives at their own institutions? How might interdisciplinarity-oriented policies and practices at universities influence university research productivity? How do interdisciplinarity-oriented policies and practices at universities affect individual faculty scholarship?

74. Technological Innovation, Primary Healthcare and Social Justice

Organized by: Hui Luo, National Academy of Innovation Strategy, China Association for Science and Technology (NAIS, CAST); Zhengfeng Li, Tsinghua University; Xinqing Zhang, Peking Union Medical College; Achim Rosemann, Warwick

Primary healthcare refers to the most essential healthcare services, based on the idea of social justice and the right to better health for all. These principles were laid down in the declaration of Alma Ata in 1978 and were subsequently adopted by WHO. Four decades later, the realisation of universal access to primary healthcare remains an unachieved goal. While new opportunities emerge from the development of new medical technologies in STS researches, there are concerns that investments in new healthcare technologies could be spent in more efficiently ways. This panel invites authors to examine opportunities, pitfalls and practical challenges of contemporary technological innovations in primary healthcare. It addresses the (in)sensibilities of S&T developments in primary healthcare from a cross-country perspective, the prism of social inequality and cultural diversity, in order to generate novel and comparative insights into the following issues (but not limited to): the use and distribution of new technologies in primary healthcare, e.g. electronic health record and medical devices; the tensions that emerge between adoption of new technologies and needs of locally-evolved models of primary healthcare, that require a certain level of flexibility and adaptability; the balance between integration of new technological innovations and need for continued investments to increase the quality and quantity of local healthcare personnel; and the logistic challenge of training healthcare staff to adequately use new technologies,  as well as strategies to identify and overcome cultural barriers to use of new healthcare technology among patients.

75. Plasticity, Postgenomics, and the Politics of Possibility: Critical Reflections on the Environmental Turn in the Life Sciences

Organized by: Maurizio Meloni, University of Sheffield; Martine Lappé, Columbia University; Becky Mansfield, OSU

The past decade has seen a growing appreciation in the life sciences for the complex relationships between biological and social life. Novel concepts in postgenomic biology and claims of an “environmental turn” in the life sciences are viewed by some scholars as challenging genetic determinism and its emphasis on the fixity of traits and behaviours. Others have raised concerns about the social and political dimensions of these developments. In line with the conference theme of (in)sensibilities, this open panel calls attention to the concept of plasticity, which has emerged as central in a number of burgeoning disciplines including social neuroscience, environmental epigenetics, nutrigenomics, microbiomics, and developmental origins of health and disease. The panel will bring together papers that critically examine plasticity from various disciplinary, empirical, and theoretical perspectives. We invite papers that look at the complexity and ambiguity of plasticity, its meanings and potential consequences for the governance of life processes and populations, its temporal and gender politics, its impacts on sociotechnical imaginaries across contexts, and its implications for social and environmental justice in the Global North and South. Far from celebrating plasticity, we invite papers to critically reflect on its relationship to contemporary shifts in the life and social sciences, its historical legacy, and the promises and hype surrounding the concept. The panel seeks to broaden our critical imagination and to support scholarship that thoughtfully engages claims that a more profound biosocial era is upon us, in which the innate and the environmental, historical and contemporary, are increasingly entangled.

76. Sociotechnical Approaches to Privacy and Data Protection

Organized by: Meg Jones, Georgetown University; Katie Shilton, University of Maryland

A January, 2016, survey found more Americans are worried about data privacy than losing their main source of income. To date, Google has removed over 663,280 URLs from personal search results in response to users exercising their right to be forgotten. And since July, 2016, 120 journalists have been arrested in Turkey for content expressed online. Privacy and data protection have become incredibly complex, relevant topics.  Approaches to privacy and data protection are often either legal (with an emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of the individual rational subject and formal governance tools of the state) or technical (with a focus on machine capabilities, problems, and solutions). However, some of the most influential recent thinking on privacy and data protection has explicitly incorporated sociotechnical knowledge and approaches. As STS scholars engaged in privacy and data protection issues, we believe that work on the sociotechnical problems of surveillance, dignity, intimacy, boundary negotiation, memory, forgetting, and data-facilitated power can advance both the technical and legal aspects as well as the economic, ethical, social, international, and historical aspects of the conversations. We solicit papers that address these topics from a sociotechnical perspective. This may include but is not limited to topics related to: Privacy as a social challenge; Privacy and technology in historical context; Sociotechnical facets of data protection; Privacy and boundary negotiation by individuals and communities; Impacts of datafication on individuals and communities; Memory and forgetting; Data imperatives, economies, and/or cultures; Global politics, surveillance, and speech.

77. STS, Critical Design, and the Critical Digital Humanities

Organized by: James Malazita, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

This track aims to bring together scholars working at the intersections of Science and Technology Studies, politically-engaged Design and Making work (including Speculative and Critical Design & Making), and the Critical Digital Humanities, in order to share perspectives on the methods, challenges, and stakes of “doing” STS and the humanities in material and digital form. This track is envisioned as a critical complement to the “Making and Doing” event—while the Making and Doing event affords the ability for STS scholars to showcase their design work, this track affords space for critically reflecting upon the spaces, ideologies, mediations, and politics embedded within and enacted through the intersections of STS scholarship and materially-engaged design work. Possible paper topics include critical analyses of current and previous STS-engaged design and digital projects (including the presenter’s own); reflections on the institutional, infrastructural, and ideological constraints of doing alternative and materially-engaged scholarship; issues of the power and position of scholars designing and making in academic and non/tangentially-academic spaces; potentials and risks of doing interpretive and critical scholarship via technologically-mediated design work; and future directions for STS and humanities design. We are particularly interested in critical perspectives on design from feminist, postcolonial, and queer standpoints, and on design and DH projects, spaces, and methods that specifically address questions of power, oppression, access, ontology, and materiality. We also extend invitations to “making and doing” scholars engaged in STS-related work in intersecting fields, including Media Studies, Literature & Science, and Design.

78. Historical (In)Sensibilities

Organized by: Martina Schluender, University of Toronto; Susanne Bauer, TIK-Oslo; Nils Güttler, ETH-Zurich

Throughout the past decade, the fields of STS and the history of science and technology have increasingly engaged in largely separate debates. This is curious, because STS and the history of science and technology share both a common genealogy and still many overlaps in topics and methods. History (or historical settings and case studies) has stimulated STS for decades, and practices/modes of temporalization traverse the STS literature as a matter of course. Empirical matters in STS such as in climate science, geology or biosciences are often historical in themselves. But at the same time, some scholars experience that inflating STS concepts with history does not resonate with the concerns of the field. The goal of this panel is to rekindle a debate between STS scholars studying contemporary phenomena and historians of science and technology. We invite papers which address, for example, the following questions: How to address historicity in research on contemporary phenomena in the here and now? Is history about the past or about the present? What can STS learn from debates in history, for instance over historiography? How do we deal with versions of the past, their presences, half-presences or hauntings in STS concepts? We invite contributions that reflect and address such frictions, as they engage with different empirical materials.

79. Island Imaginaries: From Repositories to Experimental Labs

Organized by: Mascha Gugganig, Technical University Munich; Maximilian Mayer, Tongji University

Particularly in western thought, islands have borne a fascination for “exceptional“ ecologies or “remote” human societies and political systems. As repositories conducive not only to evolutionary theories but for theorizing the social, their potential for intervention has equally been an allure. Colonial empires, military logistics, and also philanthropists have turned islands into experimental labs of the natural, technical, and the social. Examples range from nuclear tests to developing genetically engineered crops or testing electrical grid systems in more contemporary times. Bringing together these two island imaginaries – repository and experimental lab – allows exploring how islands and their oceanic environments, in the gaze of outsiders, emerge as sociotechnical imaginaries (Jasanoff & Kim 2015) that constitute both the exceptional Other to be preserved (biodiversity, culture), and synecdoches of the world. This panel examines island imaginaries by inviting research in STS and other disciplines, such as international relations, geography, indigenous studies, anthropology, and history. The papers aim to query the normative virtue of “original,” “remote”, “untouched” (social and natural) states, as well as the experimental intervention as normalized, unquestioned undertakings of modernity in the distance. We ask how islands are made sense-able through diverse modes of knowledge-making. How do experienced realities of island inhabitants (see Hau'ofa 1993) challenge established accounts of islands? How to account for the heterogeneity that emerges from conflicting imaginaries and experiences? Building on recent STS scholarship, the panel seeks conceptual and ethnographic accounts of historical and contemporary cases of islands as technoscientific test beds. Discussant: Rebecca Lemov, Harvard University.

80. STEM Education: Conservative Restoration and Neoliberal Retrenchment

Organized by: Matthew Weinstein, University of Washington-Tacoma

This sequel to a 2015 open session looks at schools through an STS lens as sites of technoscientific occupational and ideological production. Since 2015, some state policies have shifted towards more fractious, nationalist, and conservative directions, e.g., in US, UK, and Turkey, simultaneous with a redoubling of neoliberal commitments globally. How these systems interact in the formation of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) educations is the subject of this panel.  We seek papers that explore, interrupt, rearticulate, critique STEM education policy or practice with in the contemporary contexts. In the 2000s STEM emerged as an articulation of traditional distinct disciplines. STEM promoted neoliberal, capitalist, and militarist logics/priorities, e.g. in its emphasis on human capital, promotion of market hegemony in the purposes of science and mathematics, and its fetishization  of entrepreneurial subjectivities. Political ruptures such as Brexit in the UK and the election of Donald Trump in the US signal a shift or retreat in the circulation of these discourses. Even earlier, the passage in the US of Every Student Succeeds Act signaled power’s operations away from central managerialism. With rising conservativisms, governmental power is shifting to networks that challenges climate change, promote resource extraction, and endorse religious ideologies promoting conservative national, racial and gender orders. This panel invites papers that examine both the articulation of STEM educations to this new ideoscape and that examine either strategic or unconscious resistance to those logics at the levels of policy or practice through philosophical, discursive and/or empirical work, globally.

81. Public Health and Zika: A War on Environmental Ethics?

Organized by: Mary Duggan

The Zika virus is not a new disease. It was discovered in the 1940's. New information on the modes of virus transmission, along with the visual impact of Zika-related birth defects, create an atmosphere of threat. While virus transmission may happen (and thus be stopped) in a number of ways, new developments in mosquito control technologies may challenge emerging ideas of environmental ethics. What are the consequences of such technologies? What is (or should be) the relationship between technologies of public health and environmental ethics? This panel invites papers exploring mosquito control technologies in public health, ranging from GMO to traditional door to door awareness.

82. What does the Smart Office Know?

Organized by: Melissa Gregg, Intel Corporation; Tamara Kneese

In the spirit of STS scholars who have studied configurations of non-human and human actors (Braidotti 2013, Haraway 2008, Hayles 1999, Sharp 2011), this panel asks: Can an office ever be smart? What skills will a building need to prove its value? How do humans respond to jobs and environments that are intended to make them irrelevant? These and other reflections on the smart office are necessary to situate the imminent Internet of Things (IOT) in the broader history of office automation. From artificial intelligence to embedded assistance, the smart office ostensibly solves workplace inefficiencies by applying the processing power of cognitive computing. But it does this on terms that favor the enterprise. The worker’s experience is rarely prioritized, even though the specificity of human skill will be increasingly important as nonhuman agents contribute to a digitally augmented workplace. This panel welcomes papers on the taskification of white-collar work, the role of virtual agents in the labor process and the prospect of instrumented, computational objects as peer companions for workers. We seek contributions that can inform the design of both IT and management protocols in this new landscape, to overcome historical biases in the composition of assistive technologies, and to ensure the possibility of sustainable and fulfilling workplaces. Further topics of interest include:  Filing, finding and searching the cloud; “Below the line” office labor; Ergonomics, aesthetics and euthenics; Surveillance, measurement and privacy; Interspecies sociality and IOT.

83. Theorizing Harm

Organized by: Beza Merid, University of Southern California; Max Liboiron, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Whether focused on toxicity, disease, disaster, violence, or malfunction, STS scholars have long studied harm. Given the great diversity of approaches and cases, this panel seeks to take an intersectional approach to theorizing harm. We ask how harm is re/defined by the systems it is part of. In Mary Douglas’ theorization of pollution, she claims that, “where there is dirt, there is system: […] a set of ordered relations and a contravention of that order” (1988: 36). Harm is also a contravention of order. What characterizes these orders and their infringement? How are definitions of harm challenged and what is being challenged, exactly? How do different metrics, modes of management, regimes of perceptibility, systems of power, and accountability co-define harm? What are the spatialities and temporalities of harm, and how do they co-construct harm? In short, what is harm and why? The answers will depend on their cases, but we hold that despite differences, there are unifying characteristics. We seek to explore these through a collection of papers that explicitly theorize harm. We invite papers from a wide range of approaches to thinking about harm: pollution, biomedicine, ecosystems, disease, labor, race, class, gender, Indigeneity, law, risk, history, reproductive justice, media studies, repair studies, and more. Note that we are seeking papers that explicitly theorize harm, as opposed to those that describe it or its metrics.

84. If Not Now Then When: STS and Critical Race Theory

Organized by: Michael Mascarenhas, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

In an era of colorblind racism, using the category of race is widely decried as racist; for example, including race as a factor in college admissions is seen by some not only as no longer necessary but as a form of “reverse racism.” Shamefully, in Science, Technology, and Society, with a few notable exceptions, race and new racial formations are at best under-theorized and at worst, simply ignored. There is no excuse for race to continue to be sidelined in STS scholarship and institution-building. Artifacts, boundary objects, trading zones and laboratories still fascinate us, at a time when science is increasingly being conducted outside laboratories by street scientists, many of them people of color. We include primates, scallops, dinosaurs, and sheep in our analysis, and yet we rarely include race in our multi sited and multi species discipline. Papers in this panel will examine contemporary features and surfaces of the DuBoisian colorline from an STS and critical race perspective. Subjects of interest will include, but are not limited to, Black Lives Matter, Flint, Ferguson, white privilege and other matters of racial inequality and justice.

85. Sense and Nonsense in Modern Mathematics

Organized by: Michael Barany, Dartmouth College

This open panel seeks submissions on the history, sociology, and cultural studies of modern mathematics that explore how changing forms of abstract and theoretical knowledge have related to changing material and sensory means of making sense of such knowledge. Modern mathematics features a distinctive and multilayered sensorium of formalisms, images, and embodied practices for creating and coming to agreement about facts and conclusions that can often seem distant from or independent of mathematicians' physical worlds and social contexts. Mathematicians decide what is valid, suggestive, promising, meaningful, or useful through a wide variety of interactions susceptible to investigation, from personal discussions in offices or in front of blackboards to presentations in lecture halls to long-distance theory-work through letters, articles, and digital platforms. These interactions make potentially nonsensical flurries of signs and figures into meaningful mathematics. By tracing the seam joining sense-work and sense-making for apparently non-sensical or para-sensical intellectual formations, contributions to this panel should situate mathematical ideas in embodied social environments. Such studies can show how mathematical institutions, communications media, and other settings and means of sense-making make possible the abstract, formal systems that mathematicians create, while giving rise to consensus, rigor, certainty, and (one may go so far as to say) truth.

86. The Agenda(s) of Open Science

Organized by: Philip Mirowski, University of Notre Dame

Open Science' began as a rebellion against paywalled journals but has rapidly morphed into a project to re-engineer the very process of research. Ranging from early stage reconnaissance to crowdfunding to DIY and online lab services to publication services and distributed peer review, we are observing the early stages of a Taylorized and reconfigured research process. The eventual terminus seems to be a Facebook for science — a mega-platform that undergirds all the individual components, providing the ultimate panopticon of science. This panel invites papers that explore the individual components, as well as the politics, that promote the ultimate marketplace of ideas.

87. STS in Practice

Organized by: Alli Morgan, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

How are STS concepts and “thought styles” being relayed to emergency medical technicians, radiation health specialists, aerospace engineers, and other expert communities? How has STS been brought into K-12 and community education? Extending Science and Technology Studies (STS) research that has theorized and contextualized the emergence and organization of different fields of expertise, the proposed stream of papers and panels will explore how STS “thought styles” have been shared,  interpreted and taken up in diverse educational and expert arenas.  Building from the 2017 conference focus on contemporary (in)sensibilities in STS, contributions will interrogate the promises and challenges of developing and cultivating STS thought styles in different contexts.  Papers can focus on STS in public health and emergency response, law, engineering, urban planning, and data science, for example, describing how STS theory, empirical cases, and modes of making-and-doing are understood, cultivated, and are making different kinds of differences.  Together, papers can help build an analytic and evaluative framework for understanding STS in diverse instantiations and contexts.

88. In the making, On the move: Global Perspectives on Technology Appropriation

Organized by: Martín Pérez Comisso, Universidad de Chile; Justin F. Pickard, University of Sussex

Stories about technology are often narrated from the myth of the hero: genius men who, in specific moments of lucidity that reflect the feeling of an era, rescue an invention, an innovation, for the professions. Different models have been proposed to overcome this hero narrative: e.g., changing the point of observation of history, or focusing on controversies, trajectories or agencies that explain the momentum, impact or evolution of an artifact or system. This panel proposes that stories of artefacts and systems are (re)sensitized through the study of technological appropriation, a process that allows us to observe these trajectories from an antiheroic perspective, with an emphasis on the global diversity of user groups, sites, contexts, platforms, infrastructures involved in their access, learning, incorporation and transformation of technologies in use. The rewriting and restructuring of a given technology can be seen from a paradigm of mobilities (Urry et al.), which allows us to open our accounts to heterodox approaches in the histories of technologies (postcolonial, collectivist, feminist, among others). This panel hopes to be a space for dialogue and debate about stories of technological appropriation. We're looking for comparative works, explicitly global, either on dynamics or extended cases on the cultural processes of a technology in a particular community — e.g., Capable Share Studies on the appropriation in multiple locations that represent the different stages of the evolution of a certain technology.

89. Feelings and Doubt in Technoscience

Organized by: Monika Sengul-Jones, UC San Diego; Amanda Menking, University of Washington

“Post-truth” was the Oxford Dictionary’s word of the year in 2016. This neologism refers to how appeals to emotion—and even deliberate deception—influence the ignorance of, or rejection of facts. Feelings, and subjectivities more generally, have long been a focus of STS work. STS scholars have sought to mete out the complex relationships between positionality, affects, and networks that lead to knowledge-making claims and their role in truth-regimes. This panel seeks to address our contemporary moment’s crises of about “truth” in critical retrospective: to use the methodological tools of STS to offer a nuanced examination of the longstanding, complex relationships between feelings and doubts about technoscience historically and today. This panel invites papers that speak to a range of topics including: feelings of morality and postcolonialism (see Schiebinger 2004); the feelings that engender the spread of ignorance (see Proctor 2016); gender, feelings, and science (Harding 1991; Keller 1983); entanglements of affects and biology (Wilson, 2015); commercial industries and doubt about scientific consensus (Oreskes and Conway 2011); and gender and attachments to personal beliefs, such as vaccinations (see Reich 2014). This panel will facilitate inter-generational conversations around an important topic harmonized with the theme of 4S in 2017. “Feelings and Doubt in Technoscience” will interrogate thoughtfully and reflectively the conference’s call to bring attention to “(in)sensibilities of contemporary technoscience,” by addressing the technological and cultural means by which feelings about technoscience lead to it being ridiculed as nonsense, marshaled to incense, and/or make sense.

90. Crisis Infrastructures and the Politics of Interdependence

Organized by: Dylan Mulvin, Microsoft Research; Cait McKinney

This panel seeks papers that address activist responses to crisis in surfacing networked relationships of interdependency and vulnerability. Following several ongoing avenues of inquiry in STS, including care-work dynamics in technoscientific disciplines, the precarity of infrastructures, and a longue-durée reconsideration of network histories, we are seeking papers that consider moments of crisis that model infrastructure for at-risk (precarious) populations and justify the need for social/technical repair. We are particularly interested in social justice, feminist, and anti-colonial perspectives that foreground how activists or community groups intervene in technological infrastructures through forms of care, maintenance, and repair. The panel understands “crisis” as a way of describing how vulnerability is distributed through infrastructures: while crises are unlivable to some (the AIDS Crisis, The Prison Industrial Complex, Climate Change), they can appear as the normal state of things to others. Potential questions include:  1) How are emergent technological practices, protocols, and standards worked out within conditions of precarity, and by whom?;  How do network infrastructures become apparent as "objects” with which activists or community stakeholders might intervene?;  Within a crisis, who perceives and responds to the imperative to care for infrastructure through processes of maintenance and repair and how can the intersection of STS and social justice frameworks help contextualize this work?

91. The Ends of the Nervous System

Organized by: Matthew Wolf-Meyer, Binghamton University

The nervous system has long been seen as a mediating organ, warning the individual of external threats, tempting the individual with worldly pleasures; the nervous system depends upon the senses to bring the world into individual sensibility, and is thereby structured by sociotechnical environments and cultural value systems. Moreover, the nervous system is the basis of individual experience of the world, and might be seen as the primary mechanism through which social obligations, cultural expectations, and institutional demands are meted out; as an organ, it is intrinsic to the individual and dependent upon a world to mediate. And yet physicians and scientists often conceptualize the nervous system as a monadic, bounded, internal system, divorced even from other organ systems. But there have been other ways of conceptualizing the nervous system, including mid-20th century cybernetics, recent attention to the interrelation between the gut microbiome and cognition, anthropological descriptions of non-scopocentric sensory systems, and more recent experimentation with sense-integrating prosthetics that simulate touch. In this panel, we invite papers that interrogate the nervous system. What other models might be employed to conceptualize the nervous system and its fundamental role in mediating individual and group experiences of the world? How might the integration of these ways of conceptualizing the nervous system challenge how the body is configured in its relationships to the environment, other species, and technology? And how might reconceptualizing the nervous system enable new ways to think about the brain and its capacities, neurological disorders, aging, and intimacy?

92. Smart yet (in)Sensible? Feminist Critical Perspectives on “Smart Cities”

Organized by: Nassim JafariNaimi, Georgia Institute of Technology; Kathi Kitner, Intel Labs; Beth Coleman, University of Waterloo; Mara Balestrini, Ideas for Change

The Smart City is a topic with global importance across diverse sites. Consider recent initiatives such as the White House's “Smart Cities”, New York’s Sidewalk Labs, or Smart City Barcelona, all vying to define the city as a magical frontier full of  “smart technologies” that will benefit its citizens. The smart city evokes images of a techno-utopic city:  where traffic flow is managed efficiently; where data move at lightning speed to underpin ‘smart’ decision making; where negative environmental impacts are sensed and defused.  Implicit in these scenarios is the material infrastructure that supports them: high-speed connectivity, sensors, the Internet of Things, and Big Data.  In light of such ubiquitous computing “smart” city systems, this panel asks: is the “smart city” a sensible city? Contributing to the growing social science critique of “smart” cities, this panel problematizes the “tidy” and “efficient” vision of technologically determined smart city system design. The panel asks questions such as:  In what ways do smart cities reinforce or disrupt structures of power, modes of knowledge creation, or everyday experiences and encounters? Does smart city design facilitate opportunities for civic agency and civic imaginaries—in other words how might we understand “smart” technologies in relation to sense (accessible and actionable) and sensibility (affective and engaged)? We invite papers that reflect on the past, present, and futures of smart city discourses and practices from critical perspectives of Science and Technology Studies that include feminist, critical race theory, data science, urban planning, and design studies, among others.

93. Security in the Anthropocene: The Peripheries of Order

Organized by: Nathanael Bassett, University of Illinois at Chicago; Jason Archer

Anthropos and the nonhuman are separated by the rift of communication, but this does not preclude the existence of many ecologies connecting the two. Mutualism and animosity bind actants in codependency and competition over interests. Both the organic materiality of animals and the political prescriptions of artifacts speak to an intentionality sometimes at odds with the human. This space of conflict is where Donna Haraway calls for “making kin.” But how can we do this? Sensibility is an affective force asserted on the world, according to Franco Berardi. It emerges in the episteme and “the order of things” as Foucault writes. Perfect or true language is not one of communion between actants, but of power and direction. Communication expresses and manifests intentions, and sensibility comes from recognizing those orders. Insensibility comes from a disconnect between hostile design and users, between the persecutors and victims of coercion, and between humans and exploited ecosystems. Sensibility emerges from strict rules of contact - commands in programming, chemical interactions vis a vis pheromones, and mechanical and structural defenses in plant growth. For instance, Anthropos’s appreciation for sensibility in animals arrives with domestication, a form of genetic and social conditioning where the human arrives at a place of understanding with tamed beasts. Does sensible communication always carry the subtext of control? This panel invites papers examining strategies for overcoming insensibility and insecurity in sociotechncial systems and beween actants. Whether or not sense-making is always a process of conflict remains to be seen.

94. Drs. Mom and Dad: Patient and Caregiver Expertise and the Reconfiguration of Medical Authority

Organized by: Nicholas Buchanan, University of Freiburg

This panel investigates the ways that increasingly knowledgeable patients and caregivers—sometimes known as “expert patients” or “Drs. Mom and Dad”—are reconfiguring medical authority.  Doctor-patient relationships are traditionally rigidly hierarchical, in part because doctors have possessed  greater knowledge than their patients. Today, however, this is changing.  Thanks in part to new information technologies that make biomedical research widely available while simultaneously making possible new communities centered on disease and illness, patients and their caregivers are  increasingly expert about their conditions and treatment options.  No longer reliant on their doctors as their main source of information, patients and caregivers can learn about new research, compare “standard” treatments among hospitals and even between countries, and gain an overview about how others with their condition are treated.  They are marshaling this new-found expertise to advocate for themselves and others, while unsettling assumptions that “the doctor knows best.” We invite papers that explore the reconfiguration of medical authority and its intersections with numerous themes within STS, including the construction and contestant of expertise, social movements and new medias, professionalization, and the social study of pharmaceuticals and medicine.  Papers might also address how the reconfiguration of medical authority raises questions about what counts as accurate, authoritative, or actionable knowledge; considerations of race, class, and gender in the formation of expert-patients and -caregivers; tensions and bridges between theoretical and experiential knowledge of health, disease, and treatment; access to information and health-related communities; the reasons that patients and caregivers become their own medical experts; and variations in professional responses across national and institutional contexts.

95. Transdisciplinary Research: Transforming Sensibilities and/or Making Usable Knowledge?

Organized by: Nicole Klenk, University of Toronto

Over the last 40 years, the traditional model of science conducted by individual researchers has evolved into various models of ‘big science’, as illustrated by the increasing number of transdisciplinary research networks at local, regional and international scales in the global environmental change research community. Transdisciplinary research networks such as Future Earth are deemed necessary to address complex problems not amenable to individual research grants. Our session moves beyond the epistemological and methodological research on the nuts and bolts of how to improve the effectiveness of stakeholder-engaged research; we seek, rather, to gain a better understanding of how the performance of stakeholder-engaged research transforms the sensibilities of researchers and stakeholders and its impacts on the production of “useable science” in different geographical locations. Building upon recent scholarship on the logics of interdisciplinarity (Barry and Born, 2013), the remaking public participation in science (Chilvers and Kearnes, 2016), socio-technical imaginaries (Jasanoff and Kim, 2015) and imaginaries of publics in public engagement in science (Welsh and Wynne, 2013; Felt et al., 2016), we are interested in gaining a geopolitical understanding of the relationship between imaginaries of stakeholders, individual and collective sensibilities, and transdisciplinary research practices across different geographical locations. In line with the theme of the conference, our session invites scholars to ask how do researchers and stakeholders make sense of each other in transdisciplinary research settings, and to consider in what ways does this “sensitizing” generate (or not) usable knowledge in different socio-political contexts?

96. Visualizing Security: Remote Sensing, Visualization Technologies and the Making of Risk and (In)securities

Organized by: Nina Witjes, Technical University Munich; Nikolaus Pöchhacker, TUM

Recently, questions of security — as a set of practices, power relations and socio-technical configurations — have regained attention within the STS community, leading to promising intersections with work in security studies and criminology. With this panel, we seek to contribute to the emerging dialogue by exploring the role of visual technologies and sensing practices for the production of (in)securities. Building on and extending the approach of visual securitization (cf. Hansen 2013), our aim is to engage with practices of inscribing and circulating different semantic and political meanings in visualizations of security. We invite contributions that explore how visualization technologies are co-productive (cf. Jasanoff 2004) for the social construction of threats and changing modes of sense-making in security governance. Submissions might address the following (non-exhaustive) topics: ● How are risks and uncertainties encoded within security-related visualizations, e.g. satellite imagery, drones, Big Data analytics for policing or heat-maps?  ● Which different socio-technical imaginaries are inscribed in visualizations of security? How are visualizations of security and risk communicated differently in different context, e.g. in international security policy or urban policing practices?  ● What are the (in-)visibilities in security visualizations, e.g. when it comes to risk assessment and disaster communication and coordination?  ● What is the role of visualizations in the making of conflicts and state power dynamics?  ● How can we link theoretical and conceptual approaches from STS, security studies, and criminology to understand visualizations of security?

97. Sensing Technologies and Global Politics

Organized by: Nina Witjes, Technical University Munich; Laurie Waller, TUM

This panel seeks to bring together researchers studying or working with sensing technologies to explore relations between sensing and global politics. We are particularly interested in how sensing devices - from satellites and drones to environmental sensor networks and digital sensing infrastructures – become invested with global and socio-political significance. For instance, how do sensing infrastructures unsettle global orders and how are they accommodated? What kinds of 'infrastructural inversions' occur when sensors become objects of international political controversy? How are particular expert/lay sensing practices translated into global knowledge claims? What kinds of global issue-spaces emerge through participatory sensing? The panel aims to bring together social and political research on sensing from across STS, sociology and International Relations. We invite papers that explore how established repertoires of global politics (e.g. geo-politics, international political economy or political ecology) get (re)articulated in sensing practices and (de)stabilise infrastructures. We welcome empirical contributions from researchers deploying sensors, sensed data, sensing practices and discourses to understand and practically engage with global problems. Papers using sensing concepts to problematise theories and disciplinary formalisms of global politics are also encouraged. Submissions might address: sensing practices, politics and state-making processes; surveillance, secrecy, and issues of global security; sensor networks within globalized data infrastructures; participatory and device-centred approaches to sensing; environmental sensing and activism; visualisation and publicity of sensed data.

98. Breaking Codes: Technologies from a Gender Perspective

Organized by: Patricia Pena, Universidad de Chile; Maria Goñi, Universidad de La Republica, Uruguay; Marcela Suarez, Freie Universität Berlin; Kemly Camacho, Cooperativa Sulabatsu, Costa Rica

What does it mean to produce knowledge linked to digital technologies from a gender and/or feminist perspective? What is implied in thinking about technological developments from a feminist perspective? How does the women's and feminists' movement appropriate and make use of these technologies? While these questions have been confronted experientially around the world, they have not necessarily been incorporated into academic research and analysis. Attention is increasingly focused on the development of STEM disciplines from a gender perspective, yet it appears that actions continue to be biased and an intersectional perspective is lacking. Meanwhile, there is territory still unexplored in relation to the contributions and linkages made by women, as users and consumers of technology, but also as its creators and producers. In the field of technological development, the link between different knowledges is fundamental to investigate and systematize problems identified by women. Finally, there are multiple experiences of the use of technologies by feminist movements, but how have they been integrated into the construction of new narratives and the development of countercultural strategies? This panel seeks reflections, from a feminist view, on the construction and diverse appropriations of technologies. The panel aims to contribute to new feminist epistemologies for digital technologies.

99. Persistent Polluters and their Opponents 30 Years after Woburn

Organized by: Paul Jobin, Institute of Sociology (Taiwan); Pascal Marichalar, CNRS / Columbia University

Thirty years ago, a case of industrial pollution in the Boston suburb of Woburn paved the way for the analysis of popular epidemiology (Brown 1987, Callon et al. 2009). This case of a toxic tort class action was later the topic of a bestselling novel and a movie starring John Travolta (A Civil Action, 1999). In addition to popular epidemiology, the environmental justice movement that flourished in the US and other countries has been at the core of many STS studies on different forms of expertise and their influence in toxic torts, the regulation of hazards and the prevention of disasters (Fortun et al., Ottinger et al., in the forthcoming STS handbook). For instance, while Jasanoff (2003) has argued that the US court system performs the redistributive functions of a welfare state, though at a higher cost, for Cranor (2011), the environment is “legally poisoned” by millions of chemical hazards. In other contexts, ambitious policies (like REACH in Europe) or class actions (like RCA in Taiwan) have been impeded by persistently polluting firms spending millions in the “production of ignorance” (Proctor et al 2008) or “undoing science” (Frickel et al. 2010, Hess 2016), providing their experts for court testimony, lobbying national authorities or pressuring UN conferences on climate and biodiversity, etc.  This open panel aims to confront recent case studies of (sensitive) mobilizations against such (insensitive) persistent polluters, either through legal class actions or illegal protests, locally-grounded epidemiology or sophisticated combinations of (STS) scholars and environmental NGOs counter-lobbying international organizations.

Open Panel Topics 100-129

100. Governing Future Possibilities: Telecommunications Policy and Law as Sense-making

Organized by: Ryan Ellis, Northeastern University; Tolu Odumosu, University of Virginia

This open panel seeks to bring together critical scholarship on telecommunications policy and law in moments (both contemporary and historical) when they are concerned with governing the future. As telecommunications continues to evolve, the panel asks: How are (both formal and informal) policy and law making sense of future possibilities? Who participates in this sense-making, and who is left out? What socio-technical imaginaries of the future inform these discussions and debates? STS offers a number of lenses through which to explore telecommunications law and policy; the panel is open to different methodological and regional foci and is particularly interested in historically informed and critical scholarship that bridges STS, infrastructure studies, media studies, and work in telecommunications policy and law. Through a collection of case studies and empirical examinations, we seek to explore a number of broad themes and questions, including: How are the sunk politics of infrastructure alternately made visible and hidden in contemporary telecommunication policy debates? In what ways do contemporary conflicts over policy articulate a vision of the future? How can studies of other infrastructures (such as, the study of electric power systems, transportation networks, and others) inform our understanding of telecommunications? We strongly encourage submissions that examine these matters from a non-western perspective. Key words: infrastructure studies; telecommunications; technoscientific imaginaries.

101. Clashing Environments in Latin America

Organized by: Raoni Rajão, Federal University of Minas Gerais; Susanna Hecht

Since the beginning of STS a few decades ago, the environment has become an important site for understanding the relation between different forms of knowledge (Wynne, 1996), the delimitation of science-policy interfaces (Jasanoff, 1990) and the management of technological risks (Wiertz, 2016). But as with most of STS, these discussions tend to have a distinctively Northern perspective, taking as a starting point the emergence of post-industrial risk societies in Europe and North America. At the same time, the body of literature that discusses environmental issues in Latin America and other developing countries tends to focus on power struggles while ignoring the central role of science and technology in framing environmental issues. In this context, we aim to bring together studies that look at different aspects of the relation between the environment, science, technology and society in Latin America. We believe that in this way STS could offer new perspectives to contemporary environmental controversies in Latin America. We expect contributions from a wide range of perspectives within STS and beyond, covering topics such as payments for environmental services (PES), REDD+, urban pollution, (post)colonial conservation, local knowledges about the environment, socioenvironmental conflicts, production of environmental knowledge across the north/south divide.

102. Dissemination, Disembodiment, Diversity: Science and Technology in a Post-Truth World

Organized by: Ravi Shukla, Jamia University, Delhi

In normative STS understanding, state as well as corporate actors draw upon the supposedly objective, impersonal nature of science to make their decisions appear impartial and free from bias. Put differently, the scientific claim to truth — where mathematical and abstract rationalities prevail over sensory evidence — has traditionally formed the basis of public credibility. In a social media driven, “post-truth” world, where objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion, are the nature and mechanisms of state/corporate influence changing? Digital information technologies, in the form of the internet and mobile devices, have played a significant role in this shift. As Katherine Hayles and others have suggested, these technologies tend to assume a disembodied view of the world, one in which the information about an object is seen as distinct from the object itself. How does the traditional debate between social shaping of technologies and technology as an autonomous force change in a scenario wherein the nature and extent of social influence is shaped by the selfsame technologies? Is it possible to have a more embodied approach without abandoning the idea of an objective truth? This panel suggests that post-truth is not a sudden, epochal phenomenon but a more gradual shift that has been in the making. Since the shift to a post-truth world appears to be global, the panel invites both empirically oriented as well as conceptual papers that engage with the tension between a more embodied approach and the need for objective truth.

103. Indigenous Knowledges and Technologies

Organized by: Tiago Ribeiro Duarte, University of Brasília; Claudia Magallanes, Universidad Iberoamericana Puebla - Mexico

Indigenous knowledges and technologies are a marginal topic in STS, with few studies, articles, and books being published on the topic despite the array of experiences and approaches from other fields such as media studies, visual anthropology, telecommunications, human rights, to mention a few. In its early years, STS focused mainly on scientific knowledge, particularly on controversies and on the construction of scientific facts. In the mid-1980s it expanded its focus to the construction of technology with the emergence of SCOT and other research programmes. About the late 1980s and early 1990´s, a turn towards the science-policy interface brought new attention to local knowledges and expertises in the field. Nowadays, citizen and open science are popular research topics and receive growing attention from STS scholars. However, indigenous knowledges and technologies remain marginal. STS appears still to be in need of a process of decolonisation, as to a large extent it is still insensible to knowledges, technologies, and epistemologies that have arisen from indigenous, aboriginal or native peoples around the globe. This panel seeks to bring together researchers interested in topics related to indigenous knowledges and technologies, including, but not restricted to: a) appropriations of indigenous knowledges and technologies; b) indigenous knowledges and biopiracy; c) indigenous knowledges and technological policymaking; d) uses and developments of information and communication technologies (ICT) by indigenous peoples; e) decolonial and postcolonial indigenous STS; f) clashing ontologies between indigenous and modern societies.

104. Shaping the Human-Technology Frontier

Organized by: Rick B. Duque, SUNY Polytechnic Institute

This session welcomes interdisciplinary research from an STS lens that critically evaluates and/or is actively involved in developing projects where integrated technologies (sensors, communication, computation, virtual intelligence) are embedded around, on, and in human subjects and the environments they inhabit. Thematic questions this session will explore: How are emerging integrated technologies shaping human behavior and health in relation to natural and built environments? How are they shaping social organizations in relation to natural and built environments? What are the ethical/legal implications of integrated technologies on privacy and security?

105. Articulating the Sensibilities of Social Media

Organized by: Ricky Leung, University at Albany - SUNY

As a communication technology, social media pertains to a myriad of STS theories. Yet, given social media’s popularity and fluidity, it is unclear if existing theories are sufficient to capture its role in transforming established practices with respect to science-making. This panel invites papers to articulate the sensibilities of social media in relation to STS. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:  1) To what extent is social media a citizen science? How do citizens contribute to advancing the science of social media? 2) Is it appropriate to use social media for purposes beyond personal communication? When using social media in public health promotion, emergency preparedness, and STEM education, what may be relevant analytic and security concerns? 3) How can we utilize social media to measure, operationalize, and refine STS concepts, such as expertise, collaboration, networks, and diversity? 4) Can we rely on default metrics (e.g. likes and shares) to evaluate social media? How can we better utilize social media’s big data? 5) How do social media platforms (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram) enable and/or restrain transnational scientific work? To what extent do these platforms envision, promote and undermine specific future imaginaries? 6) What is—and is not—social media in the Internet world? Is it necessary to give social media a formal definition? We welcome papers that address these and similar topics, adopting any theoretical orientation(s) and empirical approach(es). Perspectives from outside STS are also welcomed.

106. Sense and Sensibility: Science and Religion in a Secular Age

Organized by: Renee Blackburn, MIT; Marie Burks, MIT

STS scholars have demonstrated the persistence of religious beliefs and values in shaping sense and sensibility, even in a supposedly secular age. In this panel, we investigate ways of knowing, doing, and being that complicate narratives of strictly secular science and technology in the twentieth century. We are interested in exploring “alternative modernities” and conceptions of rationality that unsettle the dichotomy between science and religion. In practice, the borders between the two are contested and ever-shifting, as actors stake out diverse political and ethical positions. We invite papers that seek to understand the myriad ways and means by which claims to reason and truth are articulated and adjudicated. We draw inspiration from historians of science and STS scholars who have considered such alternative modernities and conceptions of rationality: Karen Barad’s Meeting the Universe Halfway, Carol Cohn’s “Sex and Death in the Rational World of Defense Intellectuals,” Hugh Gusterson’s Nuclear Rites, Deirdre McCloskey’s The Rhetoric of Economics, Matthew Stanley’s Practical Mystic, John Tresch’s “Cosmologies Materialized: History of Science and History of Ideas,” and, shifting from Western culture, Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar’s edited volume, Alternative Modernities. Perspectives from the history of science and technology, STS, and beyond are welcome.

107. Social and Solidarity Economies

Organized by: Robert Gouveia, Ministério do Trabalho do Brasil

This panel invites papers that explore aspects of the emerging Social and Solidarity Economy, which names an alternative way of producing, distributing and consuming goods and services in relation to traditional capitalist forms. In Brazil and in other countries of the world, this proposal has public policy status and suggests the self-organization of participants in productive groups (associations, cooperatives, among other types) with the objective of sharing, in an equitable way, the results of these productive processes. It aims to effect a transformation of the world in which we live to be a more just and self-sustaining environment, where solidarity among peoples is the watchword.

108. Limits of "Infrastructure"

Organized by: Robert Montoya, UCLA; Gregory Leazer

As George Lakoff reminds us, we understand complex social systems through conceptual metaphors and other linguistic constructions.  Within STS and other fields, a predominant metaphor is that of "infrastructure", which is used to describe a variety of systems, regimes and arrangements of phenomena.  Steven J. Jackson defines "infrastructure" as the "social and material forms foundational to other kinds of human action," but clearly the concept of "infrastructure", understood both literally and as a metaphor, implies more than that.  What are the properties of "infrastructure"?  Why has this concept been so generative?  What are the limitations to the concept, especially when understood as a metaphor?  What blind spots are created by the shared theoretical approaches of STS?  For example, do conceptualizations of "infrastructure" presuppose standards as inherited and constitutive of the object of analysis?  How do notions of infrastructure open up or foreclose discussions of ethics?  The concept of "infrastructure" has allowed STS scholars to extend their work into new domains by characterizing them as sociotechnical.  Recent work in STS in particular has explored the concept in terms of "knowledge infrastructures."  Are there other kinds of infrastructure that either concern us or illustrate the limits of the concept of infrastructure?  Research is welcome from all areas of STS.  We are particularly interested in papers that explore the relationships between STS and Information Studies.

109. Analyzing Race as a Ghost Variable in Human Research

Organized by: Rebecca Jordan-Young, Barnard College, Columbia University; Katrina Karkazis, Stanford University

The routine collection of subjects’ "race" in studies on humans ensures that race is present in research, even if investigators choose not to analyze it. Moreover, research on domains that are potently racialized in the larger world (aggression, criminality, sports prowess, health, leadership, intelligence) engenders a sense that findings are relevant to race, and vice versa, even when researchers do not explicitly address race. Race is ubiquitous, but usually as a background variable, its meaning opaque, the reasons for its inclusion vague. For these reasons, racial content may register on levels that resist representation and analysis with tools that are familiar (or seem “proper”) to technoscience and STS. We propose a panel that explores methods and analytic models for identifying the operation of race in scientific research that is devoid of explicit racial content and messages. The panel asks: What are the mundane practices that position race as a “ghost variable” in studies of human evolution, behavior, and health? What methods and models are required to account for the relational nature of race, and to ensure that STS analyses avoid the reification of race as a material property of bodies? In a context in which deep analyses of race expose researchers to charges of “going too far” or reading too deeply into the implicit content of studies (alongside or even against the explicit content), what strategies can we employ to counter this?

110. The Politics of Deficit Construction

Organized by: Sebastian Pfotenhauer, Munich Center for Technology in Society, Technical University Munich; Erik Aarden, Univ. of Vienna

The construction of societal “deficits” with regard to science and technology – e.g. in public understanding of science, in development or modernization contexts, or in terms of technical democracy – has been a target of STS critique for several decades. While the identification of such “deficit diagnoses” has yielded important insights, research on deficits has hitherto been sporadic and fractured, with no systematic framework connecting the various sites, practices, and politics of deficit construction. This track aims to put the politics of “deficit diagnosis” front and center and to develop it as a theoretical lens for understanding ongoing reconfigurations in the science-technology-society relationship. We are interested in the entire range of sites and levels of analysis at which deficit diagnoses occur (e.g. national, regional, institutional, individual…), the variegated functions for which deficits are being mobilized, and the normative agendas deficit diagnoses entail. Among the topics we hope to attract are: • Diagnosed deficits in technological or innovation capability; • Democratic or legal deficits ensuing from advances and technology; • The relationship between science, expertise, and the public, e.g. in science communication and public engagement; • Metrics and benchmarking practices associated with deficit diagnosis; • Modes of policy-making and governance related to deficit diagnosis (e.g. proliferating competitiveness rhetoric, technocratic approaches); • The co-construction of deficits and solutions/cures, and corollary constructions of deficient (and ideal) publics; • Questions of inequality and power in the diagnosis and addressing of deficits; • Future-making and promise-generation based on deficit diagnosis.

111. Entangled Sciences of Gender, Sexuality, Race: Latin American Issues

Organized by: Sandra Harding, UCLA; Manuela Fernandez Pinto; Tania Perez-Bustos

The miscegenation policies that the Spanish and Portuguese introduced into the Americas in the Sixteenth Century established more hierarchical and rigid categories of gender, sexuality, and race than had existed earlier. These new, pre-Darwinian, sciences of race, sexuality and gender were complexly entangled with each other from the beginning. Some Latin American scholars, such as philosopher Maria Lugones, have argued that they still have powerful effects today, while others, such as social scientists Silvia Cucicanqui, Mara Viveros, and Marilise Matos have argued for a more complex understanding of the intersectionality that the categories of gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity have in the region. This panel invites papers that ask:  In what ways has this colonial scientific legacy persisted? In what ways has it been revised? How do Latin American feminists, both in Latin America and in the North, discuss this issue? How has it shaped (or not) STS methodological projects in Latin America? What role have such discussions played in democratizing projects? How has it influenced conceptions of gender as an analytic category, as well as theories of ethnicity, race, and cultural diversity in Latin America?

112. Citizen Science Politics and Practices

Organized by: Shun-Ling Chen, Academia Sinica; Iris Eisenberger; Melanie Dulong de Rosnay

The term “citizen science” has a plurality of meanings: from various forms of public participation in science, crowdsourced science, community actions for regulating risks, and grassroots hacking. The roles of citizens in these initiatives vary: they may act as scientists’ sensors, trained to collect and analyze data; they may challenge regulatory standards, collect and analyze data — sometimes with the tools they design — in order to set their own agenda. The relationships between lay participants and professional in these initiatives range from tamed/collaborative to radical/competitive. The intended outputs of these projects also differ — from scientific publications, monitoring systems, new devices, identifying and removing hazards, to policy changes. Despite the ambiguity, the term “citizen science” has gained popularity in public policies and grant awarding opportunities, although often only for those on the "tamed" side of the spectrum. Exactly what citizen science can bring or is expected to deliver cannot be answered without resolving such ambiguity. This panel invites STS scholars, historians of science and techno-legal researchers to propose case studies and theoretical contributions exploring the boundaries of citizen science, as well as its techno-scientific and public policy impact for community-building, civic participation, the development of commons, and the production of knowledge.

113. Emerging Technologies and Conservation

Organized by: Katie Barnhill-Dilling, North Carolina State University; Jason Delborne

If the broad (and sensible) approach to conservation is the protection and ethical use of natural resources (with an emphasis on the ‘natural’), one could argue that emerging technologies — especially but not limited to the tools of genetic engineering — have rendered some conservation efforts ‘insensible.’ In our understanding of meaning-making behind how conservation efforts might unfold, emerging technologies’ role in conservation may spark calls for reimagined landscapes that integrate multiple knowledge bases (e.g., historical ecology and responsible innovation), require hybridized and problematized notions of the ‘natural,’ and disrupt assumptions about traditional partnerships and positions. Importantly, such an amalgam of ethical and technical considerations also calls for emerging analytical and governance frameworks to explore the dynamic socio-technical landscapes and relationships. This session invites papers that address the complex intersections between emerging technologies and conservation. With an emphasis on the at-times surprising dynamics between the tools and techniques that emerging technologies are making possible in conservation efforts, papers may address one of the following questions: What new tools or new applications might bridge traditionally oppositional actors, and what new meanings must be constructed? What combinations of knowledge bases are being called for as emerging technologies impact traditional conservation efforts? What surprising partnerships and positions are emerging as a result of the application of emerging technologies in conservation? What assumptions are being disrupted about what is deemed natural? What surprises might emerge as emerging technologies are brought into the spheres of conservation?

114. Biolegalities in Globalization: Investigating Ethical In/sensibilities

Organized by: Sonja Van Wichelen, University of Sydney; Marc de Leeuw, University of New South Wales

The life sciences are fundamentally reshaping law and legal practice. This panel engages with contemporary cross-border challenges and implications of new biotechnologies and biological knowledges in the field of law. It is interested in papers that examine the complex and often contested ways in which biotechnologies or biological knowledges are reworked by, with, and against legal knowledge. Reproductive technologies, genetic privacy, GMOs, biobanks, patents and intellectual property, transgenic animals, nanotechnology, neuro-interventions, gene “editing”, xenotransplantation, and diasporic proxies in global biomedicine are increasingly becoming common practice in the 21st century. While the growing scholarship on biopolitics has studied the ways in which such practices are entangled with certain modes of governance and neoliberal economies, their translations, deployments, and reconfigurations in the realm of law or legal practice has been relatively understudied. The panel seeks to explore the in/sensibilities of legal knowledge in responding to challenges actioned by emerging biotechnologies and biological knowledge. The normative is a constitutive element in these responses and the panel explicitly seeks to examine how ethical and normative sensibilities play out in expanding jurisdictions such as in European or international law. We welcome paper proposals that can speak to academic audiences across Law, the Social Sciences, and the Humanities, and are especially interested in empirical cases that look at the larger geopolitical context in which jurisdictions increasingly expand and cross states and nations.

115. Beyond Identification: Biometrics and the Governance of Social Life

Organized by: Michelle Spektor, MIT; Ranjit Singh, Cornell University

From unlocking personal smartphones and designing national IDs and passports, to conducting criminal investigations and verifying financial transactions, the use of fingerprints, facial recognition data, iris scans, and other biometric modalities in ID cards, databases, and scanning devices is increasingly becoming part of governing social life. The use of biometric identification technologies not only places the locus of identity onto the quantified human body, but also intervenes in and (re)configures a variety of sociotechnical relationships. These include, but are not limited to, relationships across: security, risk, and civil liberties; exclusion, criminalization, and citizenship; data, subjectivity, and ontologies of the body; power, expertise, and resistance to surveillance; and histories of biometrics, antecedent identification practices, and techno-optimistic (or pessimistic) future visions of achieving “unique” identification. The ubiquity of biometric technologies as preferred methods of identification, and their inscription into everyday digital infrastructures, presents opportunities to critically examine how the use of biometrics constitutes new conditions of governance and resistance. This open track welcomes papers that investigate how identification technologies, particularly those based on biometrics, are reshaping the governance of social life across national, social, political, administrative, institutional, infrastructural, and technological contexts. It aims to interrogate the socio-cultural and techno-political dimensions of biometric identification technologies beyond their usual framing in terms of security or surveillance by bringing insights from STS into conversation with perspectives in surveillance studies, critical security studies, information science, and other fields.

116. Bodies, Technologies, and In/Sensibilities in Movement

Organized by: Sam Haraway, University of California - Davis; Robin Rae, University of Vienna

A central and ongoing theme of works in STS concerns the entanglement and dis-entanglement of bodies and technologies. Bodies become enabled and/or disabled, move or are moved, through the distribution and coordination of materially heterogeneous entities. These processes may also be explored in terms of bodies becoming sensible and/or insensible. For example, in dancing, hiking, running, cycling, or other forms of everyday im/mobilities, bodies become entangled and disentangled with technologies, disciplinary techniques, environments, and more. In their material-collective movement, bodies learn to sense the world differently, such as through enjoyment, balance, or loosing oneself, all of which may equally include discomfort or pain. Bodies are not only multiple in their enactments, but also in the ways their senses are continuously re-formed with diverse material and discursive practices that enable and disable their movement. This panel welcomes contributions that explore the complex relationalities of bodies, technologies, and the enabling/disabling of their senses in movement. Questions to consider include, but are not limited to: As action is made (in)accessible to bodies, what becomes of their senses? How are bodies enabled and/or disabled from sensing? How do various (dis)entanglements of sensing bodies, technologies, and other entities affect one another? How are modes of sensing made durable? How do they fade away? The panel seeks a wide range of empirical cases and topics that explore these issues, and others related to the theme of im/mobile, dis/entangled bodies becoming in/sensible, using diverse methodological techniques.

117. Studying Science Communication

Organized by: Sarah Davies, University of Copenhagen; Maja Horst

The last decades have, in a number of countries, seen an increase in science communication and public engagement activities. In many places a well­ defined 'deficit to dialogue' narrative tells of the move from 'public understanding of science' (PUS) models of communication (dominant in the 1980s and '90s) to more dialogic approaches, based on two­way communication between science and its publics. STS scholarship has been instrumental in these developments. Theoretical and analytical attention, as well as experiments with practice, have, however, tended to focus on policy­ oriented or governmentally sponsored engagement, and especially on overt efforts to 'democratise' science. This panel focuses on forms of science communication that do not claim to formally influence policy or scientific research, and which may at first glance feature one­way communication. This includes, for instance, science in museums, science fairs and festivals, popular science media, science blogging, sci­art activities, and university and lab open days. We invite critical STS analysis and discussion of these activities. This might include, for example, reflections on the role science communication may play in the democratisation of science, analyses of the constitution of publics and knowledges within particular science communication activities, or accounts of experimental practice. The panel will thus use the methodologies of critical STS to reflect upon the problems, potential and practice of contemporary science communication.

118. Life and Death of Partnerships in Research and Innovation

Organized by: Signe Vikkelsø, Copenhagen Business School; Julie Sommerlund, University of Copenhagen

Innovation is emphasized as a crucial means of ensuring economic growth, employment and welfare in society. Public funding bodies throughout the world argue that universities, businesses and society must be linked closely to ensure this aim, and multiple programs seek to stimulate network formation and knowledge transfer. Collaborative research aimed at commercialization is not new, but rather described as an integral part of a ‘Mode 2’-science (Gibbons et. al., 1994). Today, however, collaborations are no longer conceptualized primarily as networks enabling open innovation, but increasingly as contractual partnerships and consortia working towards predefined ‘societal challenges’ and/or commercialization. While this contractual partnership-principle pervades current funding policies, there is little clarity regarding governance principles and evaluation criteria. The situation is one of massive investment in an experimental organizational model. How partnerships work, what type of research and innovation they foster, and how they can or should be governed are open questions. This panel invites contributions that address questions pertaining to the idea, mobilization and constitutive effects of ‘partnerships’ in research and innovation. Papers might address:  Enrollment, mediation and exclusion of partners across industry and universities;  Exploration versus exploitation: how to govern partnerships in a time romanticizing radical innovation?;  Virtues and vices across different types of partnerships;  The role of performance indicators in partnership governance: input, output, impact and ‘process indicators’;  Theorization of ‘innovation’ and the drift towards ‘big is beautiful’.

119. Sacred Sensibilities: Spirit meets Matter

Organized by: Lisa McLoughlin; Simon Wilson, Canterbury Christ Church University, UK

The science that grew out of natural philosophy became Modern through a shift in methodologies, objects of study, participants, products, and goals. The overarching themes of these changes were separation and mechanization: complex interdependent systems were "solved" by being simplified to mechanistic individual ones, participation in the endeavor labeled science was restricted to "qualified" individuals, and processes were standardized as those that clearly isolated observer from observed. Nature became a dead machine uninhabited by spirit(s), and scientists became impartial and logical, denying the sacred had any place in their work.  We are interested in exploring how, and what happens when, a sense of the sacred enters human experience of nature and culture on the personal, disciplinary, and societal levels. Openness to spirit has varied in pre-modern, modern, and post-modern scientific eras; it remains a point of contention between western and other cultures' sciences; and it continues to affect how we understand, inhabit, design, and interpret natureculture.  We invite papers that address such questions as:  What happens when spirit meets matter? What ethical and other transformations may occur when the object of study is conceived of as alive with spirit(s), or when the knower is believed to be enspirited in body and mind? Many sacred traditions talk of spiritual senses: what may they be, what kind of knowing may they entrain? May they teach us the limits of and how to go beyond technoscience’s apparatus of senses and sensing,? How is this holistic way of sensing being conceived of and incorporated into scientific (including social sciences and technological) disciplines?

120. The Politics of Forensic Identification in the Wake of Disaster and Atrocity

Organized by: Victor Toom, Goethe University Frankfurt; Sarah Wagner, George Washington University

Forensic sciences like anthropology, archaeology and genetics are important mechanisms to restore names to anonymous remains. Such mechanisms are increasingly deployed to identify victims of mass human fatality incidents like political violence, war, atrocities and disaster. Research in STS and beyond has clearly shown that processes of locating, recovering, identifying and repatriating someone’s remains are shaped by intersecting regimes of scientific, legal, and sociopolitical value—from juridical reckoning and reconciliation projects to funerary rites and commemorative events. This panel has two aims: to scrutinize forensic practices in a field sometimes (inappropriately) called “disaster victim identification," and to reflect on the analyses of those practices by STS and other scholarship. What is it that forensic mechanisms help to reveal, and what is it that remains hidden with respect to, for example, the objects of research or the events leading to mass death? Similarly, what becomes enacted through the research(er), chosen methodologies, and political and theoretical affiliations? We invite papers that will engage critically with forensic scientific practices in the wake of mass human casualty events as well as with our own research practices, ethics and the politics of our interventions.

121. Working at the Edges:  Migrants, Women, and Minorities in Technosciences

Organized by: Sharon Traweek, UCLA; Diane Yu Gu, UCLA; Reynal Guillen, Univ. California, Riverside; Jarita Holbrook, AAAS

Global circulations of migrants, women, and minorities (MWM) through technosciences, including STS,  fundamentally transform sense/knowledge makings, material cultures, and infrastructures, while remaking technoscience MWM and exposing the glocal political economies/exclusions at play. MWM can strategically negotiate intersectional distinctions at work while building alternative processes and engagements with technoscience work. This open panel calls for projects using an array of discursive, methodological, and theoretical strategies that explore such queries as:  What strategies enable technoscience MWM to work successfully at the edge? When and where? How do they vary between MWM and differ from others?  * How do MWM workforces/practices in STS resemble other technoscience MWM?  * How have MWM gained/maintained access to, engaged with, and changed technoscience (education, jobs, projects, techniques, discourses, data, instruments, etc)?  * What kinds of webs of relations do technoscience MWM build/maintain/avoid?  * What kinds of sense/knowledge making strategies and pedagogies do MWM employ, and why?  * How do MWM circulations enable new kinds of sense/knowledge making?  * How do MWM interventions differ across technoscience fields?  * How do socio-cultural (in)sensitivities affect sense/knowledge making when technoscientists often believe their work is neutral about socio-cultural distinctions?"  * What are MWM discursive and narrative strategies? * What STS theories make sense of MWM practices? How do MWM practices intervene in STS theory making?  * What do MWM strategies expose about glocal technoscience ethics and political economies?  * Why has the global representation of MWM in the biomedical/social/STS technosciences changed so much since 1970, compared to physical sciences/engineering?

122. Property Matters

Organized by: Veit Braun, LMU Munich

Despite its recent interest in markets and economics as well as its longstanding focus on things, STS has so far largely neglected property as an object of its research. When property is brought up, it is usually in the form of property rights which, in turn, are mostly understood as intellectual property. But what about the property matters itself? Are they, like John Locke's acorn, just patiently waiting to be appropriated, leaving everything to lawyers, courts, and legislatures? Or do they also get a say in if, how, and under what conditions they will enter into a property relationship? This panel invites contributions that closely engage with the nature of property objects and the societies, economies, and institutions they summon. Understanding property in a broad sense — from locked bikes to research papers to kidneys — it asks what it takes for these things to work as property. Apart from laws and rules, which technologies demarcate, identify, move, and hold property in place? How much work does appropriation and, conversely, alienation of property take? And how does the division of labor between owners and property bring both into being? Extended abstract at: https://www.academia.edu/30664954/Property_matters

123. Affect and Emotion across Sites of Technoscience

Organized by: Venla Oikkonen, University of Helsinki; Mianna Meskus

Affect and emotions not only connect the mind and the body, they also connect us to human and nonhuman others. Affects and emotions are ambivalent: they may both challenge and strengthen dominant social orders. This panel seeks, firstly, to understand the complex ways in which emotion and affect shape the production, circulation, routinization and cultural reception of science. Secondly, the panel charts the role of science and science studies in the emerging political landscapes of “post-truth” reality in which emotions often override factual evidence. The deployment and circulation of affect and emotions within and between sites of technoscience poses an urgent challenge for STS. To make sense of this challenge, we seek to connect empirical analyses of emotions at specific sites of technoscience to theorized accounts of the affective dynamics of technoscientific society. We hope to chart elusive and elucidatory connections between sites where affect and emotion emerge as powers that shape our social worlds. The panel is open to papers that address any empirical site or historical moment. We welcome a range of theoretical approaches that address affect/emotion, for example, as flows, intensities, pulsations, embodied sensations, global networks, culturally circulated objects, socially negotiated structures, or cultural frameworks that shape our actions. Papers may address questions such as: How is affect or emotion evoked, appropriated and embraced at a particular site of science and technology? What kinds of constellations of actors and relations these affective dynamics produce? How are different sites of affect and science connected?

124. The Sensibilities of East Asian STS: Strategies, Trajectories, and Visions

Organized by: Wen-Hua Kuo, National Yang-Ming University; Michael Fischer, MIT

STS in East Asia is, in effect, theory from the Global East that has fast come to challenge, supplement, and rearrange theory from the Global North (traditional STS), theory from the Global South, postcolonial theory or subaltern studies from India, or white settler postcolonial theory from the antipodes. The historical antecedents of STS in Asia are undergoing dramatic re-narrations; they have answered contemporary needs to go beyond “methodological nationalism,” which uses zombie categories long after they have become destabilized by national boundary crossings at all scales and levels. The anthropology of STS in Asia requires new methodologies and planning orientations that acknowledge the technological and science and that entail profound changes in human-technology-nature investments. STS in Asia manifests in variegated configurations from more politicized contests in the STS communities of Korea, Taiwan, and Japan to more development-oriented dilemmas and moral contests between the common good and individual entrepreneurship in Asia, along with more integrative anthropological and historical approaches in Singapore, China, and Australia. The mission of this panel is, therefore, to make East Asia STS sensible in terms of trajectories, strategies, and visions. Expanding the critical scope of both earlier policy studies and the history of ideas and the history and philosophy of science, this panel welcomes papers that address new topics, methods, and thoughts derived from this sizeable scholarship with particular awareness that STS has become a growth field, where, as at the 4S, people from different regions and disciplines meet, converse and inspire each other.

125. Synthetic Actors: Drones, Robots and Algorithms as Sensible Interaction Partners

Organized by: Niklas Woermann, University of Southern Denmark; Karin Knorr Cetina, U Chicago

In particular situations or social settings, humans begin to encounter drones, robots, and even software algorithms as interaction partners. That is, they are being experienced, treated, or addressed as actors by everyday participants of, e.g., stock markets, robotics development labs, or UAV test facilities. This open session will be dedicated to theorizing empirical phenomena of this type. We do not intend to theoretically declare all material entities to be potential actants, or to frame all social conduct to be enmeshed into ‘ontologically flat’ actor-networks; such a move would render the particularity of these cases invisible. Instead, we aim to investigate synthetic situations (Knorr Cetina 2009) in which either screens or robotics afford the response presence of not only human interaction partners, but also software or machines. Actorship and the experience of being-in-interaction are thus tied to the situation, and are structured by its organization, temporality, and regime of attention. We call for empirical and theoretical papers investigating the forms, effects, structures, or problems of mediated, robotic, or synthetic situations that afford interaction or synthetic actors.

126. Techno-Jobs and Capital

Organized by: Winifred Poster, Washington University; Norma Möllers, Queen’s University

STS has a long tradition of inquiring about techno-work and providing foundations for studies of locality, partiality, contingency, and agency.  Less attention is paid to the connections of techno-jobs to the systems of political economy in which they are embedded.  The goal of this track is to encourage  explicit discussion of the ways these new jobs are shaped by and sustain capital, and how they relate to broader shifts in the organization of labor and workers. We emphasize how this applies to both elite and subordinate types of techno-labor.  It includes high-status jobs like the entrepreneurs and evangelists who market and distribute technical products for firms and nations, software coders who are bound by corporate non-compete contracts, techno-venture firms that are scrutinized for under-employing women, high-tech developers that rely on immigrant labor and the ‘body shopping’ practices of intermediary contracting firms, etc.  It also includes a growing sector of middle and low status workers like the data janitors who clean up the internet, senior citizen ‘workampers’ who travel in their RV’s to labor at Amazon.com warehouses, manual workers who dispose of our phones and laptops, etc. We welcome papers that engage issues such as: transnational and post-colonial labor dynamics; techno-venture capitalists; R&D labor; crowdsourcing and micro-labor; outsourcing; sharing economies; creative, media, and game labor; automation; bot labor; algorithmic controls of labor; consumer labor; maintenance, repair, and care; labors of techno-waste and breakdown; racialized, gender, queer, and (dis)abled inequalities of technical labor; and digital strategies within the labor movement.

127. ‘Make Do and Mend’: How to Prepare for a “Post-Solar Flare Future” with and by Collaborative Practices

Organized by: Yana Boeva, York University; Leo Matteo Bachinger, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

The technological promises and desires to cure and solve instabilities in societies and systems recur with every new development. Nonetheless, contemporary techno-societies become ever more fragile in their dependency on global, techno-scientific infrastructures of information and communication, transportation and logistics, medicine, food production and distribution, etc. This panel assumes a highly speculative scenario: A solar flare triggering a geomagnetic storm, wiping out global(ized) electrical and communications networks on a large scale without a chance to recover it. With this narrative intervention serving as starting point, we seek to inspire questioning of globalized techno-social foundations, and their political and social dimensions. Confronted with a troubling future, this panel invites ideas for preparation, making do and mending. Extreme scenarios serve to reveal humanity’s inescapable reliance on technology in daily life, at the same time rendering us vulnerable. Narrative strategies such as this are not new to STS, related academic disciplines, or the realm of speculative fiction, and have produced a large array of countercultural ideas, guides and movements, from Steward Brand’s ‘Whole Earth Catalog’ (1968) and Buckminster Fuller’s unconventional constructions to contemporary collaborative technologies and practices involving non-experts and users. Starting from this proposition, the panel invites theoretical, empirical, artistic and speculative contributions that address everyday issues of our global techno-society implementing practices of self-sustainment such as do-it-yourself, tinkering, and care, and consider how these can generate theory through practice.

128. Can AI "Do science?"

Organized by: Yuko Murakami, Tohoku University

It is claimed that AI could replace employment in many sectors in the coming decades. What then will humans (of our next generation) work for? Creative jobs such as musicians and educators of social skills are unlikely to be replaced, but what about scientists? The question animating this session — "can AI do science?"— means to focus on the essence of scientific conduct. Can AI reasonably realize modelling and theorizing from observed data and simulations? Or will human beings still be required to do such tasks? Papers concerning the issue, especially from the approaches towards conceptualization, modelling, and simulation, are invited. Papers with online demonstration or visualizations are also welcome.

129. Internationalizing Science and Technology

Organized by: Leandro Rodriguez Medina, Universidad de las Americas Puebla

If we accept, with most STS scholarship, that science and technology are the outcome of heterogeneous networks that transcend the relatively fixed spaces where they are enacted (from laboratories to cities to national systems of innovation), then it seems difficult to consider their internationalization as a phenomenon worthy of study. Nevertheless, from pioneering works in the field, such as Shapin and Schaffer’s Leviathan and the Air Pump and Latour’s Science in Action, there is interest in exploring how knowledge changes when it travels from its place of production to others where it is used, appropriated, and eventually critically defied. In this open panel we want to analyze the current and seemingly unstoppable trend of knowledge internationalization by addressing issues such as (i) the international dimension of knowledge production in both social and natural sciences, (ii) the policies that encourage internationalization and the challenges they bring about, (iii) the effects of asymmetries in knowledge circulation, (iv) the role of materialities (e.g. instruments, standardized procedures, software, etc.) to dis/encourage internationalization, (v) the relevance of language(s), and (vi) the adaptations of researchers, research teams, and institutions to increasing pressures to internationalize their work by national and international funding agencies. We call together scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds, different geographical locations, and using a diverse range of theoretical and methodological approaches in order to problematize internationalization and to understand its macro and micro configurations.

Open Panel Topics 34-66

34. Building Bridges for Innovation: Improving Public-private Relationships 

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35. Making Sense of Climate Policy

Organized by: Darrin Durant, University of Melbourne

The phrase "the science and politics of global warming" correctly hints at the way science and politics are mixed together, but do such ‘mixology epistemologies’ prevent us from arguing that in some cases climate policy was more sensitive to politics than to science? If science and politics are inseparably blurred, does that mean we cannot investigate (at a National level?) some kind of spectrum of sensitivity and insensitivity? This panel invites reflections on a spectrum of sensitivity and insensitivity, using (as the empirical illustrations) national stories about climate change policymaking and/or efforts to establish science-policy interfaces (at various levels of governance and activism). Put provocatively, are we limited to being critics of linear-models of science-policy interfaces; limited to reminding people the boundaries are more blurry than they think? To what extent can or should we, as social critics, be sensitive to the ways climate change policy might be more sensitive (or insensitive) to knowledge or to politics? The question of sensitive and insensitive appears central, for instance, to some grand narrative debates in the climate research field: has global policy about climate change failed because of the hubris and linear-model approach of scientists (see Howe’s ‘Behind the Curve’ (2014)), or because of the savvy manufacturing of doubt by industrial-political interests (see Klein’s ‘This Changes Everything’ (2014))? In what way might national-level climate policy be more sensitive to science or to politics in nationally variable ways? Can some kind of 'politics of the sensitive' thus reveal what nationally-relevant insensitivities are built into climate regimes?

36. Making Sense of Political Calculations

Organized by: William Deringer, MIT

As recent electoral events have shown, intensive calculations—from data-driven, “micro-targeted” campaigning strategies to the probabilistic electoral forecast models crafted by FiveThirtyEight and The New York Times—have gained considerable authority over how political actors and the public make sense of political processes. These new forms of political calculation present an opportunity, and challenge, for STS scholarship. The politics of quantification has long been a key problematic for STS scholars, who have focused largely on the use of quantitative practices as technologies for exercising state control and as technologies for generating political trust. Are these prevailing schema of control and trust—or objectification and objectivity—sufficient for explaining the potent (politically, culturally, emotionally) forms of calculative practice and engagement evident in contemporary political life? This panel invites papers that explore new ways of understanding the place and power of calculation in political processes, in any historical or contemporary context. Taking this year’s conference theme, In(Sensibilities), as a cue, it particularly invites contributors to reflect on the use of quantitative tools as instruments of sensing, sense-making, and sensation in politics. Topics might include: the quantification of political sentiment; “statactivism”; quantitative methods in political science/theory; performances of calculation in popular media; feedback, reactivity, and performativity; affective engagements with political numbers.

37. Necropolitics

Organized by: Mara Dicenta-Vilker, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Achille Mbembe (2003) used the term ‘necropolitics’ to account for the existence of ‘death worlds’ within postcolonial geopolitical spaces. While work in biopolitics has privileged the dynamics of ‘making live and letting die,’ Mbembe highlights the importance of both, extending lives and making deaths. Rosi Braidotti (2013) follows Mbembe and includes posthuman subjects within the politics of death. Contemporary Anthropocene — as a limit of total extinction provoking an intense scholarship around the boundaries of life and worthy lives — is not exempt from problems associated with Western notions of individualism and humanism (Haraway 2016). In certain ways, Braidotti’s approach, along with other vitalist materialisms such as the work of Bennett (2010) or Barad (2007), allow for the generativity of Life to be seen as a material ongoing force that usurps such Western tendencies. While they transcend the idea of death as an exceptionally human experience that conditions political existence, at the same time they tend to reduce processes of death into Life, or ongoing generativity. How can STS research and mobilize the production of boundaries between life and death, between Life as organic and that which is Non-Life (Povinelli 2016)? How can we account for processes of differential dying in more-than-Western, more-than-human, more-than-bios, or even, more-than-earth worlds? This panel looks for contributions around the material semiotics of death, dead subjects, and killing/elimination that engage with the processes by which they are maintained, resignified, or disrupted.  Welcoming fabulation, empirical, theoretical, or speculative communications.

38. Side-effects of (In)Sensible Participatory Technology Developments

Organized by: Diego Compagna, Technische Universität Berlin

A peculiar case of insensibility in technosciences is raised by the increasing interest in participatory technology development (PTD). PTD enfolds a dynamic that could be described as a double-bind situation for science and technology studies (STS) itself: STS insights often expose one-sided processes of technology development, insensible to social issues, creating a clear rationale for PTD designs. However, an often unintended as well as (due to STS’s insensibility) ignored outcome of PTD consists in the construction of a dualistic approach reintroducing a distinction between humans (routed in nature) and technology (routed in culture). The unintended problem reverses the calls to overcome historically-contingent, socially constructed distinctions, and the distinctions they engender (e.g. sex, gender, race, bodily fitness, etc.) and to promote the freedom to choose who- and whatever a conscious entity (cyborg) would like to be (embodied or not). In the proposed session, I would like to gather scholars who have carried out research in the field of PTD with the intention of detecting the undesirable, mostly non-intended side effects of user integration and their relation to societal structures promoting hierarchical oppositions and social inequality.

39. STS and Law in the Public Health Hazards of Industrial East Asia

Organized by: Hsin-Hsing Chen, Shih-Hsin University

Science and law are two institutionalized epistemic authorities which are expected to operate independent of all other authorities and produce knowledge solely on the merit of evidence and rules. In the drive toward modernity in East Asia since the late 19th century, these two social spheres are often inhabited by two rather distinct groups and interact minimally with one another in their work. This science-law disparity is a conspicuous feature of industrial East Asia. The court of law, for example, often prefers that scientific experts provide presumably impartial written opinion, rather than testifying in court and undergoing cross-examination, as in jurisdictions where partisan expert testimony has long been taken as part of the legal procedure. The situation changes significantly when a judicial system is challenged to adjudicate science-intensive public controversies based on conflicting scientific arguments. One example is the so-called “toxic tort” litigation—victims suing corporations in occupational disease, pollution, food safety, and other issues of toxic exposures. Under rapid industrialization, East Asian countries are rife with such controversies, starting with Japan’s Minamata-disease controversy since the 1950s to Taiwan’s RCA campaign and South Korea’s Samsung Leukemia campaign in the recent decade. STS scholarship can be very useful in such public controversies to bridge the science-law divide as “translation” in its multiple connotations is an essential craft of the trade. This panel seeks to explore the experience of social engagements of STS scholarship in such cases in the specific conjuncture of contemporary industrial East Asia.

40. Visual (In)Sensibilities

Organized by: Dorothea Born, University of Vienna, HafenCity University Hamburg; Regula Valérie Burri

Images are everywhere. They surround us, shape societal beliefs and value systems, and influence how we make sense of the world. Yet, images are not innocent representations of reality but created within societal practices and imbued with cultural values. Within contemporary visual cultures, visualizations are intrinsically linked to technological artifacts, such as cameras, x-rays, ultrasounds or MRIs. The development of digital image production and manipulation impinges in new ways on questions of the reproducibility and authenticity of images. At the same time, visualizations themselves can be regarded as technologies of perception that make the world sense-able. They play a fundamental role in the production of scientific knowledge (Latour & Woolgar) but also in the communication and dissemination of knowledge. While an important topic for STS in earlier years, recent STS engagements with images have been rather scarce. In this panel we want to re-open discussions of STS’ (in)sensibility towards the visual, promoting the social studies of scientific images and visualizations (SIV) (Burri & Dumit). We encourage contributions that investigate how visualizations make the world sense-able, focusing on the practices of imaging and imagining. Contributions may look at how (scientific) images are produced (as two- and three-dimensional artifacts, as static and moving objects, etc.), what kind of role they play within knowledge production, as well as at what happens when images travel beyond their contexts of production and engagement. We also encourage studies looking at the role of images in science popularization and communication.

41. STS after Truth: Narrative, Translation, and Advocacy

Organized by: Davide Orsini, Mississippi State University; Anna Maria Weichselbraun, Stanford University

Constructivist approaches to the historical and social study of science and technology aim at "debunking" universalizing narratives about the existence of truth and objectivity. This scholarship has attempted to make plain that claims to truth are always also claims to power, and that these power relations are worth exposing in order to make possible a more just world. STS and related disciplines are thus centrally concerned with representing the diversity and complexity of knowledge making in the world, and challenging narratives that naturalize technoscience by decoupling it from the social orders in which it is embedded. This panel gathers perspectives on the role of STS scholarship in the present political and social world in which, especially in advanced democracies, the status of truth is deteriorating. Inspired by scholarship that has attempted to theorize the production of ignorance and uncertainty (Proctor & Schiebinger 2008), this panel probes the topic further by asking the following questions: How can STS contribute to recentralize the value of scientific truth in responsible decision-making choices, while retaining its critical outlook on contemporary and past knowledge/power relations? What is the relevance of the STS project in the face of political elites that are contemptuous of established scientific consensus and the fact-based investigation of discernible reality? We welcome multidisciplinary reflections on the use of new narratives, and on the public responsibility of STS scholars in translating expert/local knowledge, especially when working with populations most affected by climate change and elite-driven technopolitical processes.

42. What is ‘(Un)making’ STS Ethnographies? Reflections (Not Exclusively) from Latin America

Organized by: Fredy Mora-Gámez, University of Leicester / Universidad de los Andes / Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Santiago Martínez-Medina; Tania Pérez-Bustos

STS scholars have found in ethnography a means to produce situated knowledge about their own research problems. Likewise, STS has offered a set of discussions that has permeated ethnographic practice. Hence, STS-oriented ethnography consists of an interface or contact surface that continuously unmakes and remakes interpretations, ways of seeing, as well as objects, categories and descriptions. Still, ethnography is not exempt from this transformative process; ethnography is also reconfigured as a knowledge object. The latter aspect is of particular interest for this panel. Drawing on our own research in Latin America we believe that ethnography, while being unmade and remade, might deserve additional adjectives. Thus, we have speculated about the possibility of rethinking STS ethnographies as experimental (destabilizing the meaning of knowing), mestizas (hybridizing different objects), decomposing (accounting for creative processes in unconventional places), stacked (permitting the coexistence of different ontologies and arrangements in a single space), more-than-human (destabilizing the human/non-human distinction), and  (in)sensible (questioning what seeing, feeling or experiencing through modern technoscience is about). We seek contributions from Latin América as well as from other similar localities around the world, that reflect about other possible adjectives, and ways of (un)making STS ethnographies. Far from establishing a taxonomy, we want to delve in reflections exploring (1) how STS ethnographies reconfigure other objects and/or (2) how STS ethnography is unmade and remade through its own use.

43. “Would you recommend this shoulder surgery to your friends and family?” The Effect of Online Feedback and Ratings on Health Care Service Provision and Perception.

Organized by: Farzana Dudhwala, University of Oxford

Increasingly, people are going online to comment or give feedback on their experience of care, and health care service providers are encouraging patients to do so. Patients, carers, and service users can share their personal experiences in a range of ways. There are specialist websites which ask for feedback on doctors or hospitals, such as Patient Opinion or iWantGreatCare; some service providers make their own surveys using SurveyMonkey; some patients choose to share their stories through personal blogs or on discussion forums; and others still turn to social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. In what ways might this shape the way health care services are valued and rated? We invite papers that explore the nuances of eliciting, gathering, moderating, recording, and making sense of online patient feedback. Who and what is involved? Who is included and who is excluded from this increasingly popular method of obtaining scores of satisfaction and narratives of experience? Are some online means more credible than others, and why? What is the potential for resistance, rejection, manipulation or misappropriation? What is the effect on the agency of the patient and the care provider? Through what methods can these processes be traced? We expect that the papers will contribute to either theoretical or methodological developments relating to online patient feedback and ratings, exploring how these new ways of sharing experiences of healthcare might affect how service providers are rated and valued, and how this might affect the way that care is given.

44. Making Sense of Autonomous Technologies, 40 Years Later

Organized by: Colin Garvey, RPI; Langdon Winner

The 40th anniversary of the publication of Langdon Winner’s seminal work, Autonomous Technologies: Technics-out-of-Control (1977), provides an opportunity to reflect both on an increasingly automated Anthropocene as well as the field of STS itself at the opening of the 21st century. In 1977, when electronic digital computers still occupied entire rooms within the citadels of the military-industrial-university complex, AI and robotics were still largely arcane avocations of a few research teams and entrepreneurs. Today, smartphones with millions of times the power of those machines reside in the pockets of billions of people around the world; robotic beasts crawl over rubble to win prizes from DARPA; and consumer automobiles are (finally) beginning to drive themselves. Forbes magazine has already named 2017 “The Year of AI,” and China is poised to outpace the US and Japan combined in total numbers of industrial robots. R&D funding for autonomous technologies is at an all-time high, as are both optimism and fear about the futures they promise. Meanwhile, some of the world’s leading democracies struggle to function under conditions of electronically mediated information overload. How are we making sense of these technological transformations forty years after Autonomous Technologies? And how should we be? What still applies? What has changed? What have we learned since, and what remains insensible to us? This panel welcomes contributions on autonomous technologies, broadly construed to include historical and contemporary reflections as well as speculative and future-oriented pieces.

45. Academic Careers: Gaining Independence in Different National Contexts

Organized by: Grit Laudel, Technical University Berlin; Ed Hackett, Brandeis University

A crucial step in academic careers is the transition to a position in which one can conduct independent research. Standards for hiring into tenure-track jobs, tenure, and promotion are each based on demonstrated ability to work independently and to support a research program. From the perspective of science policy, early-career researchers are seen as sources of the original ideas and boundless energy necessary for transformative science and innovation. Yet current research careers in many countries are characterized by longer phases of intellectual gestation: research conducted under direction of others (e.g. as a postdoc) and delayed moves to independence. Positions that formally grant the right to conduct research independently grow increasingly scarce. In some countries, science policy responds by creating formally independent positions or by limiting the time researchers can spend in dependent positions, with varying success. How do young researchers cope with extended dependence and strive to achieve and maintain some form of independence under changing conditions in different career systems? How do national contexts differ in supporting the transition process towards independence, e.g. in terms of career positions offered, project funding opportunities or evaluation processes? In which career phases does it happen and which consequences has it for the content and conduct of research? What are the implications of extended intellectual gestation for recruitment of talent and for increased diversity in STEM fields?

46. Transhumanism: Critical STS Engagements

Organized by: Grant Shoffstall, Williams College

Transhuman is shorthand for transitional human being. So-called Transhumanism, commonly denoted by “H+” or “>H,” is a cultural, intellectual, and, some have argued, religious movement, which advocates radical human enhancement by way of the anticipated convergence of “GNR” technologies— “G” for genetic engineering and biotechnology, “N” for nanotechnology, “R” for robotics and artificial intelligence (Dinerstein 2006). At what is arguably the movement’s outermost limit, many transhumanists anticipate the eventual transcendence of human biological constitution all together; and the arrival of a postbiological or “posthuman” condition, Humanity 2.0. This panel aims to bring together STS scholars engaged in critical research on any and all dimensions of the transhumanist movement. Topics for exploration might include, but are hardly limited to, transhumanism’s ties to eugenics, the movement’s advocacy of anti-aging and life extension medicine, transhumanist themes in science fiction film and literature, and transhumanism’s discursive ties to the so-called “Singularity.” Ideally, such explorations would delineate the sociohistorical conditions under which transhumanist ideas have emerged and circulated, attend to the material practices through which transhumanist ideas are threaded, and identify the movement’s key progenitors and advocates.

47. Institutional Theory and Large Technical Systems

Organized by: Hans Klein, Georgia Tech School of Public Policy

In studies of large technical systems, models of social constructionism have emphasized agency over structure.  Agency-related concepts like actor networks, interpretive flexibility, and system builders have remained influential for years. There have been calls for greater emphasis on structural approaches. Klein and Kleinman’s “The social construction of technology: Structural considerations” (2002, Science, Technology & Human Values) reviewed structural theories in sociology and argued for their relevance to STS research. Despite being widely cited, the article’s impact on STS research has been limited, with few of the citations in the flagship journal Science Technology & Human Values. The literature on large technical systems has explored structural and institutional concepts.  Perhaps most notable here is the edited volume, The Governance of Large Technical Systems (Coutard, 2002) which brings an institutional perspective. However, this work, like other such edited volumes, has emphasized richly descriptive case studies over theoretical considerations. This open panel calls for research on structural studies of large technical systems that emphasize institutional theory.  We invite papers that draw on such works as the institutional theory of Elinor Ostrom, regime theory from international affairs, and policy models of federalist and constitutional structures.  The goal is to promote discussion among scholars sharing a common interest in the role of institutions in large technical systems but drawing on a variety of theoretical models.

48. Citizen/Netizen Empowerment and the Korean Candlelight Revolution: Roots and Significance

Organized by: Jay Hauben, Columbia University (retired); Ronda Hauben

By Oct 2016 a significant candlelight movement/revolution was developing among citizens and netizens of South Korea. While the immediate trigger for the candlelight events of 2016-17 was the corruption being uncovered of Park Geun Hye's government and non-government accomplices, the more significant background may be the experiences of citizens and netizens using the Internet to explore ways in which their participation can solve difficult problems and expose elaborate schemes of deception. Korean examples include the exposure of scientific fabrications in the stem cell work of Hwang Woo Suk in 2005 , the citizen forensics and other analyses by netizens relating to Korean government misrepresentation of the evidence in the sinking of the Cheonan warship in 2010, the action by Zaro and the Netizen Investigation Team into Korean National Intelligence Service (NIS) interference in the presidential election in 2012, and the same team's critique of the ROK government investigation of the Sewol Ferry tragedy in 2014. Papers for this open panel could explore these or similar events where citizen- and netizen-scientists played important roles in uncovering and documenting fraud or politicized scientific investigations in South Korea or elsewhere. Appropriate also would be papers analyzing events in the candlelight movement/revolution in South Korea toward more democracy and especially how the netizen and citizen activist tradition in South Korea has helped to encourage and shape these recent developments.

49. Precision Medicine, Race/ethnicity, and Public Health in Comparative Perspectives

Organized by: Shirley Sun, Nanyang Technological University (NTU)

Human molecular genetics have generated a focus on precision medicine (also known as personalized medicine or stratified medicine), with the promise to use the analysis of an individual’s unique genetic makeup to enable more precise diagnosis and treatment of diseases and illnesses around the globe. At the same time, however, there is a rich body of work demonstrating the simultaneous racialization of biomedicine and the molecularization of race (Duster 2006, Fullwiley 2007, Fujimura and Rajagopalan 2011). Studies in Asia have identified is ethnicization of biomedicine and the molecularization of ethnicity (Sun 2017, Tsai 2012). This panel calls for papers examining the intersection between the pursuit of precision medicine and the degree to which racially- and ethnically-based population studies of human genome variance shapes the delivery of public health.  The following are possible questions for papers in this panel:  How do scientists define populations in population-based genetic and genomic studies in the pursuit of personalized medicine?  What is the interaction between population-based genetic/genomic studies and public health in different political contexts?  Whether and how do population-based genetic/genomic studies shape genetic screening policies?  What should the government pay for (drugs, companion-tests, kinds of diseases/illness) and why should they pay for it?  How should the cost be distributed among different stakeholders (the government, insurance companies, employers, patients, etc)?  Should precision medicine serve as a national/public healthcare strategy; why or why not? Who actually benefits from the precision medicine initiative?

50. Can the Subaltern Research?

Organized by: Ivan da Costa Marques, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; Anita Say Chan University of Illinois; David Nemer, University of Kentucky; Lars Bo Andersen, Aarhus University

This panel questions research on ‘the subaltern’ by focusing on processes whereby established theory can reinscribe acts of domination and erasure of options, in a variation on Spivak’s query,  “Can the Subaltern Speak?” (1988) We point out three possible entry points: 1) The subaltern researcher.  Xavier Polanco (1985) used the expression “domestic brain drain” to identify “a cognitive position assumed by Third World and Latin American scientists, who without emigrating from their countries guide their scientific work in terms of research fronts, reward systems and publication of developed countries.” The ambivalences between simultaneously copying and rejecting the models of European civilization often lead subaltern colonized-colonizers who are approaching modernity to a hindrance. 2) Dialogue with the subaltern. A second entry point comes at the intersection of two seemingly accepted claims within the STS community: “science is capable of dialogue only on its own terms,” and “a respectful enough story is all one needs to go to trial with.”  The first will require that subaltern claims to knowledge be expressed and subjected to evaluation following scientific practices. On the second, “respectful enough” means producing a set of inscriptions which, by means of their juxtaposition, stabilize the story as an entity, that is, as something formed by a detachment from of the flux of (an ever moving) reality. 3) Conflicts and limits of authority. A third entry point would be any situation where there is a conflict between the authority of scientific knowledge or fact and the authority of a local popular non-expert knowledge that scientists classify as “mere belief.” On the one hand, the (colonizer) scientist, engineer or project manager is clearly privileged in determining the scientific or technological reality of what is at stake. On the other hand, subalterns may resist and evade the definition of their reality by others in numerous and sometimes quite effective ways. The panel thus welcomes any research that investigates the stakes and dynamics in such encounters between expert and subaltern knowledges and realities.

51. Science from the Eyes of Local Cultures and Communities

Organized by: Inez Ponce de Leon, Ateneo de Manila University, the Philippines

Science communication professionals have called for science-related messages to be more attuned to local cultures and specific communities. For such a goal to be met, however, research must first examine how people understand scientific concepts at local levels. How do specific cultures make meaning of science? How do communities weigh science concepts against their other priorities when making decisions on food consumption, health, and even evacuation? What role does one's education in basic science concepts play when issues such as climate change, vaccination, or fitness come to the fore? This panel seeks to explore these local understandings, and to examine them as valid voices that merit attention rather than judgement. This panel especially welcomes papers from developing countries, where local communities have their own worldviews that need a voice.

52. STS and the Design of Dying, Death and the Afterlife

Organized by: Dara Ivanova, Erasmus University Rotterdam; Bernike Pasveer, Maastricht University; Iris Wallenburg , Erasmus University Rotterdam; Maria Olejaz, University of Copenhagen; Roland Bal, Erasmus University Rotterdam

It has been argued that many of us live in a culture where the dead and dying are increasingly sequestered from the living and enveloped in (bio)medical discourse and practices. Yet, social media, novels and films have made death present in new ways through their digital afterlife, imaging, and legacies. This panel explores STS-related work on these shifting and complex configurations of presencing and absencing dying, death and the afterlife through an empirical and analytical attention to the various historical and cultural spaces that are envisioned, designed and built for the dying and the dead, what these spaces (in)sensitize to,  and how they are governed and done. Furthermore, we focus on affective methodological reflections about the study of dying and death as a process of care.  We invite a broad scope of contributions, including (but not limited to) the following themes: 1. Designing death-scapes: the design of (urban) spaces to accommodate the dying, the dead and their afterlives, as well as the materialities of organizing dying, death, and life beyond death. What new narratives are formed and stem from places of death as arenas for doing, imagining and re-making dying and death? 2. Unpacking the normal and variations of ‘the good’: what goes into 'good' ways to die and norms of dealing with the dead and their afterlives? 3. Intersections/transitional spaces and boundary work: when does 'dying' start, when do lives end, and how are boundaries drawn and done?

53. Social Studies of Politics: What Do We Care For?

Organized by: Jan-Hendrik Passoth, MCTS, TUM; Nicholas J. Rowland, PSU

In STS, governance is conceptualized as a special kind of infrastructure crafted by science and poured into technology. What else are we to make of Max Weber’s foundational claim about the legitimate use of state violence without the bureaucratic regimes crafted in economics and jurisprudence? What is a population without a census and statistics, without techniques of defining, measuring, and counting people? Over the last decade a growing body of research in what we might call the Social Studies of Politics has unpacked the technoscientific assemblages of governing. But there is still so much more. Voting machines and census construction, official statistics and diplomatic training handbooks, data politics and state modeling -- a few of the banner cases for this STS approach to politics and governance -- are NOT just the cold, rational nuts and bolts of modern politics. They are loved and hated; cared for and rallied against; encountered and rendered familiar or hostile by citizens, diplomats, policy makers, bureaucrats and, of course, even us as scholars. These affective, aesthetic, and sensible dimension of our technoscientific assemblages of governance seem to become increasingly important to understand in today’s world of post-truth politics and its growing reliance on appeals to emotion and affect. For this year´s sessions on the Social Studies of Politics we invite contributions that explore the multiple ways in which we sense and make sense-able our contemporary machineries of governance: How do we care for files, how do we make borders visible, how to we love the technoscientific details of modern statehood?

54. Technologies as Rubble? Destabilizing Narratives of Progress

Organized by: Javiera Barandiaran, UC Santa Barbara; Tristan Partridge

Many imagined that globalization would advance uninterrupted, thanks to new technologies, and would bring capitalist development to billions worldwide. To disrupt such technological determinism and reassess ongoing dynamics of global production/destruction, we propose to examine disused, abandoned, broken or obsolete technologies as “rubble” — as affective objects that continue to influence society and politics after their allure or usefulness has waned. Analytically, this means examining how such objects persist in affecting people differentially across social, geographical and cultural positions (cf. forthcoming issue of the Journal of Political Ecology). We borrow the concept from Gaston Gordillo. In Rubble (2014), Gordillo views the destruction caused by economic globalization not as ahistorical ‘debris’ nor ruins celebrated as evidence of progress, but as rubble embedded in cycles of production/destruction revealing how past injustices are lived in the present. For this open panel, we invite contributions that explore technologies as “rubble.” Among other questions, participants might ask how such an approach modifies narratives of “failed” or “delayed” development or imaginaries of renewal, invention, and global competitiveness; how to recognize technological rubble, or apply the term to technologies in use; how technologies succumb to political and social change, not just technological advance, yet can continue to have political power in their “afterlife”; how inequalities and injustices become justified within narratives of technical rationality and sophistication; or how seeing technologies as rubble highlights their means of enduring in a given context, a quality sometimes overlooked in analyses of technological circulation across time and place.

55. STS (In)sensibilities and Health Professions Education

Organized by: Julia Knopes, Case Western Reserve University; Kelly Underman, University of Illinois at Chicago; Alexandra Vinson, Northwestern University

This panel will explore contemporary health professions education through the lens of STS: spanning the training of physicians, midwives, nurses, physician assistants, emergency medical technicians, and other biomedical clinical practitioners. Papers will ask: how does health professions education prepare future practitioners to “sense” the patient body, and to respond appropriately to medical problems? How do trainees come to grasp their social roles as caregivers, and how do they acclimate to the use of medical technologies? Papers may also consider challenges faced by both students and mentors in health professions education: including how current training paradigms may inadvertently foster insensibilities towards patients and fellow medical practitioners. This panel will bring renewed attention to education and training within the health professions in order to understand how training presents, requires, or conveys ways of knowing that shape the development of medical professionals' subjectivities and practices.

56. Science, Technology, and Sport

Organized by: Jennifer Sterling, Georgia Institute of Technology; Mary G. McDonald

While sport studies scholars have established sport as a key site of cultural meanings and social relations, fewer scholars have engaged these issues within technology and science studies frameworks. This panel invites papers broadly concerned with social and cultural inquiry into the intersection of science, technology, and sport. Potential topics include, but are not limited to: sport technologies and technologies of the active body; issues related to medicine, risk and sport; performance enhancement and bioethics; (dis)ability, gender, race, class, and sexuality, technology and sport; sporting labs and scientific practices; representations of science and sport; sport analytics, data visualization, and the quantified self; professional gaming and eSports; and, infrastructure, sustainability, and sport.

57. Sensitizing STS Analyses of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Organized by: Jennifer Singh, Georgia Tech; Chloe Silverman, Drexel University; Martine Lappé, Columbia University

Over the past twenty years, public awareness of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has grown alongside increasing rates of diagnosis. Work by social scientists has demonstrated how various social and professional groups employ different epistemologies and ontologies of ASD when they explain the causes, treatments, identities, and social consequences of this condition. Epistemologies of ASD are located in practices of knowledge making from genetics and neuroscience to diagnostic tools and treatments. Our understanding of autism also comprises alternative ways of knowing that have often been excluded from dominant accounts of autism, including the concept of neurodiversity and other sensibilities that comprise local forms of knowledge. This open panel aims to bring together STS scholars investigating different epistemologies or ontologies of ASD, to identify and articulate how STS has grasped and responded to this growing social phenomenon, and to address the limits of our analyses thus far. We seek papers exploring the tensions between dominant frameworks of ASD and sensibilities that are less known, imagined, or considered in current STS accounts. These sensibilities could include but are not limited to: implicated actors in autism whose voices are often left out or only discursively present across situations; gendered dimensions of autism diagnosis, treatment, or care; global and/or cross-cultural perspectives; relationships between human and nonhuman animals in autism science; and others. The panel will explore the sensibilities at play in perceptions and experiences of autism and aim to inspire new directions in STS research on autism and related categories of disability and difference.

58. Science and Technology Perspectives on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Organized by: Jenny-Ann Danell, Umea University, Sweden

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has not only become increasingly popular and frequently used by the general population in western societies; it is also a field undergoing various forms of professionalization and integration in conventional health care. CAM is also developing as a scientific (sub) field, in terms of peer-reviewed articles, clinical trials, and establishment of CAM journals, research centers and other scientific forums. However, none of these processes are straightforward or without conflicts. The medical and scientific legitimacy of CAM is often controversial and contested. This panel is devoted to STS perspectives on CAM, for example, concerning knowledge production, organization, professionalization, standardization, globalization, and material practices. The panel is open to qualitative, quantitative, as well as theoretical papers.

59. Sensing the Liveliness of Things and the Fragility of Life: Bringing Care and Maintenance Together

Organized by: Jérôme Denis, Mines ParisTech; Fernando Domínguez Rubio, UC San Diego; David Pontille, Mines ParisTech

In 1969, Mierle Laderman Ukeles wrote the “Manifesto for Maintenance Art” where she associated mundane practices of maintenance (both at home and at work) with the broader area of care. Although both activities, she explained, are vital in the daily production, continuation, preservation of life, maintenance and care have been typically characterized as unworthy and merely reproductive activities carried out by women and low-paid workers. Recently, several STS scholars have demonstrated that investigating care (Mol, Murphy, Pols, Puig de la Bellacasa)  and maintenance and repair (Cállen and Criado, Denis and Pontille, Dominguez Rubio, Jackson, Rosner, Ureta) could help decenter traditional issues in STS, such as agency, knowledge production, or the innovation and performativity of sociomaterial orders, as well as open up new ways to discuss politics and ethics. Though some of these works have explicitly discussed the relationships between care and maintenance, the encounters are still timid, and the discussion exploratory. We would like to use this open panel as a meeting point for those two conversations, and a way of teasing out the larger ethical, political and methodological consequences that the bringing together of the reflections on care, repair and maintenance could have for the renewal of  STS sensibilities. To do so, we invite contributions across different domains such as arts, architecture, urban studies, media studies, organization studies, and of course STS.

60. Bestial Technoscience: Nonhuman Animals as Technology and in Scientific Practice

Organized by: Jia Hui Lee, MIT; Diana Pardo Pedraza, UC Davis; Luísa Reis Castro, MIT

Nonhuman animals have long played tremendously important roles in science and technology. Their bodies, companionship, and remarkable sensory perception have figured — as inspiration and instrumentation — in the works of scientists, engineers, doctors, politicians, trainers, and artists (Scranton and Schrepfer 2004). From Karen Rader’s history of genetically standardized mice (2004) to the menagerie of bugs populating Hugh Raffles’ Insectopedia (2010), nonhuman animals have been, and are, fodder for (human) thought, action, and experiment. This panel continues the conversation about other animals as significant characters, or “companion species” (Haraway), in the shaping of science and technology. Rather than assume that these other animals are exploited for experimental and instrumental ends, we invite papers that interrogate the knowledge systems, social processes, and institutional relations that generate particular relations of becoming with (Haraway 2008), detachment (Candea, Cook, Trundle and Yarrow 2015), or exploitation (Pachirat 2011) among humans and other animals, through which humans and their companion animals are crucial actors in scientific practice and become new forms of technologies. We welcome papers that address the political, theoretical, methodological, or material implications of attending to nonhuman animals’ enlistment and involvement in human projects of surveillance, war, peace-making, global health, and environmental stewardship. We invite submissions that draw on a variety of disciplines and methodologies, including science and technology studies, multispecies anthropology, feminist and queer studies, and animal geography. This panel welcomes scholars who are creatively engaging with the themes and concerns listed here and encourages research on humans and other animals in non-Western, global South, and/or postcolonial contexts.

61. Interrogating Food Science and Technology: Green Revolutions, Grey Zones, and Black Boxes

Organized by: Jacob Lahne, Drexel University; Christy Spackman, Harvey Mudd College

It seems fashionable in a range of circles—nutrition, social justice and sustainability advocacy, slow food—to critique food and agricultural sciences.  However, outside of agricultural historians, STS scholars have largely left food and agricultural scientists, their labs, and their technologies, unexamined.  Perhaps this is due to these disciplines’ service nature—their dedication to solving problems for the agricultural industry. This may be a missed opportunity: Apostolas Geronas (2014) suggests that the most radical shifts in twentieth-century scientific knowledge making occurred in “grey zones” where the academy interfaces and compromises with industry and government.  Few spaces of scientific knowledge production are as tightly imbricated with industrial agendas and government priorities as food and agricultural sciences.  Since the early days of the Green Revolution, scientists and engineers have become primary knowledge-makers in producing food that is good to eat as well as determining what food is good to think (Lévi-Strauss 1962). We invite papers that explore the grey zones where industry, food and agricultural sciences, and governance meet.  How has the development of a science of food in these zones shaped the partnerships at the heart of the green revolution, and our food (and other) landscapes?  How has the growth of a cadre of food and agricultural experts “black boxed” (Latour 1999) what makes food good, as well as what is – and is not – food?  How have instrumentation, measurement, and technology shaped understandings of nutrition and food quality?  What worlds are produced, and which are erased, by the scientization of food?

62. Sounding Worlds:  Listening as Transformative STS

Organized by: Julie Laplante, Université d'Ottawa; David Jaclin

This panel explores what emerges in terms of sonic qualities between life forms, whether human or nonhuman, elemental or ethereal.  Taking life forms as open-ended and passing through each other, and somewhat following Helmreich's invitation to "sound" water and life (2016) and Ingold's idea that we are 'ensounded' (2011), we aim to explore how sounding might be possible and useful in making sense of worlds we make up both within and beyond science. Experiencing movement along water, air, carbon or oil shifts attention towards the ways, speeds, textures and intensities in which transformation occurs in passing or in a process of becoming something else. How might we attune our attention to hear the imperceptible or formless?  Could we hear what a plant sounds like? How might it sound differently in the wind, in a pot and as it enters the laboratory?  How might listening with plants be healing or transformative beyond their consumption?  Nuancing ideas to reify hearing as a separate sense or as disciplined listening to identify sound 'itself' or soundscapes and rather broadening the focus on forms and patterns in the acoustic milieu as relational, we invite papers attuned to (en)sounding as method and approach. Approaches that explore ways we hear in-between, mapping meaningful events, moments, affects 'sonorous archipelago' (Bonnet 2012) or 'sound blocks' (Deleuze & Guattari 1980) are of particular interest. This can include research done through recording, playing an instrument or through any other means of attuning to acoustics as ways of both understanding and constituting lifeworlds.

63. The (In)dependence of Research(ers): Good? Bad? Necessary?

Organized by: Jochen Glaser, TU Berlin; Ed Hackett, Brandeis University

The independence of science has been – and still is – a contentious and multifaceted theme in science studies. Originally defended against the idea of central planning (Polanyi 1962) and cast as functionally necessary, its value today appears to be context-dependent. STS scholars have critically analyzed the dependency of research on industry and the resulting secrecy or distortion of findings (Krimsky 2013). At the same time, we have critically analyzed the independence of research from civil society, which we consider undemocratic, irresponsive, and dysfunctional. Research has been able to demonstrate that independence from civil society actors contributes to consequential gaps in scientific knowledge (Frickel et al. 2010). Underlying such concerns are some common questions. What does being independent mean for researchers, research groups, and research organizations? Since science is never completely independent, these actors can be thought of as constantly processing dependencies and actively creating and maintaining their independence. How is this achieved? What are the consequences of independence gained or lost? We invite researchers to submit current empirical and theoretical work concerning the conditions for and consequences of the (in)dependence of research or researchers. We are particularly interested in bringing together perspectives from different disciplines and in promoting a dialogue between philosophy, sociology, the economics of science, and political studies of science.

64. Craft as Practises of Knowledge Making

Organized by: Jøran Solli, Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Roger Soraa

Craft and craftsmanship have received renewed attention in STS and research on sustainable transitions, i.e. seeing craft as innovation and as “boundary-work” between humans, materiality and policy. This panel wishes to further explore the connection between craft, knowledge and sensibilities; how is the world made sensible through craft and through technology? Professionals and practitioners work with their senses: from carpenters smelling logs to find the best ones to build a house with; musicians hearing what notes to compose; weavers getting the correct touch on their handlooms; baristas tasting their way to coffee-craft perfection; and clockmakers seeing the tiny fragments that composes intricate contraptions, just to name a few. What goes on in the world of craft, where practitioners use their hands, bodies, tactile and sensory apparati to create things? How can  STS-researchers understand the embedded and tacit knowledge practitioners inhabit and develop? How are sensibilities of craft contributing to knowledge-making and future-making?  The panel welcomes contributions that thematize the practices and processes of craft as knowledge making processes. Of special interest are issues that involve local knowledge, social learning, craftsmanship, transformation of knowledge and technology.

65. Predictability's Promises: Knowing Futures, Practicing Presents

Organized by: Julianne Yip, McGill University; Elizabeth Reddy, UC Irvine; Adam Fleischmann, McGill; Darcie Deangelo, McGill

Modern techniques to render phenomena predictable — including computer models, big data analytics, and global observing systems — have rendered certain possibilties of the future legible, and the "not yet" calculable. Predictability calls forth futures yet-to-come: from forecasts of tomorrow’s weather or Earth’s climate in 100 years to the outcome of political elections; from the next earthquake to hit a population centre to the pathways of infectious diseases; from next year’s consumer choices to next month’s military operation by enemy troops. The concept of 'predictability' is a powerful organizing figure in the production of what could or will be. Insofar as the present is an anticipatory future, 'predictability' also configures the here-and-now: it propels collective epistemic work; fashions ideologies and subject positions; and carves out fields of intervention. Predictability, in short, orders reality in curious ways. Our panel seeks to bring together scholars from diverse fields to explore the ways in which concepts, techniques, and practices of ‘predictability’ are constituted. Panelists in this session may address, but are not limited to, some of the following questions:  • How is ‘predictability’ defined in the context under study? What is the history of ‘predictability’ as a concept in this context? • Using what conceptual frameworks, tools, and techniques is ‘predictability’ constituted? What epistemic space do these tools and frameworks give rise to? • How is ‘time’ constituted in the various sciences of predictability? • How is uncertainty brought into the realm of the calculable or measurable? • For what reasons, and for whom, has ‘predictability’ come to matter in different contexts?

66. Making Sense of Practice by Engagement

Organized by: Karin Patzke, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Ellen Foster

Building on discussions and presentations from 4S/EASST in Barcelona as well as other recent conferences, this open (and experimental) panel seeks to create spaces for alternative knowledge practices that examine the epistemological and discursive methods of creating and implementing different ways of knowing and imagining the world. This panel takes seriously Shapin and Schaffer’s claim that “solutions to the problem of knowledge are embedded within practical solutions to the problem of social order” (1985:15). We ask, “how have collectives of practice developed and what are the futures that these collectives imagine?” In conversation with the 2017 4S theme of (In)sensibilities, we hope to engage ways of sensing and sense-making that often exist on the margins or at the boundaries of dominant practices within science and technology. We encourage work that examines how practitioners interpret their own work and if alternatives are indeed as radical as initially assumed. Are alternative knowledge producers in dialogue with hegemonic practices, or are practitioners engaging in novel ways of mapping/charting scientific and epistemic terrains? Most importantly, we expect presenters to abandon the formal presentation style and come to panels prepared to engage the audience in short 15 minute workshop-type experiments that directly communicate alternative ways of making sense of practice. Based on the success of a similar panel we organized last year, we are prepared to work closely with presenters to ensure - at the very least - only partial failure.

Open Panel Topics 1-33

1. Viewing Cultural Traces of Science and Technology in Africa

Organized by: Dafon Aimé Segla, Université d'Abomey-Calavi, République du Bénin

Social studies of science in Africa mostly come from a social science perspective. There is a need to start from more concrete realities of techno-scientific and multidisciplinary approaches. We know that during the 18th and 19th centuries, Western sciences were deployed in the new colonies. They were designed to be rational and then to serve the economy of imperialism, while the practices of colonized peoples were deemed irrational and therefore uninteresting scientifically. This session aims to contribute to current debates on sensibilities or insensibilities regarding the role of techno-scientific developments and infrastructures in Africa south of Sahara.  Questions include: By paying close attention to socio-linguistics and onto-epistemologies, how can the traces and paths of inherited knowledge be outlined without a simple distinction between “African philosophy” and “Other modes of knowing”?  How do lessons from African philosophy provide an opportunity to revisit the genealogy of theories, and help to suggest new approaches to a theory of knowledge from the South? How does science tackle the unexpressed, the unformulated, the paranormal, and the implicit (tacit) knowledge within African societies today? How does research within universities transform people with expertise in the local, in the contextual, and in different sensibilities/ontologies? In other words, how can research give value to lay innovators? How might we bridge the gap between researchers and local industry pioneers of knowledge production?

2. Tinkering with Data: Intersections between Critical Data Studies and Digital Methods

Organized by: Victoria Neumann, Technical University Munich; Marcus Burkhardt

Contemporary developments in many areas within STS research are concerned with data driven technologies, as concrete assemblages or socio-technical imaginaries. These technologies promise and require mobilization of massive amounts of heterogeneous data between information management systems and infrastructures that are able to combine different forms of information, as well as to modify information for a wide range of uses. Since those applications are never neutral, recent scholarship asks how data driven technologies are imbued with political, strategic and economic interests that impact the ways in which information can be used. While critical studies of data, algorithms, software, code and platforms aim at gaining a reflexive understanding of our contemporary media/technological condition, others ask how to make use of the available data and computational processes in the humanities and social science scholarship. In the area of digital methods, traditional methods are rethought and new methodological approaches are developed which bring forth tools and new approaches to research new sites. In this panel, we would like to push the discussions further into how we can change, improve and invent methodological approaches for critical inquiries when working with digital data. Possible questions include: How can digital methods be used for critical analysis of data-driven technologies? How can we critically reflect upon analysis tools and their ontological consequences for social science research and critical data studies? What does the role of tinkering with (research) data play when we're considering methodological aspects of data?  We aim at sharing experiences/approaches/ideas, and creating a space for reflexive discussions.

3. Television as a Contested Site of the Creation of Knowledge and Social Imaginaries

Organized by: Aadita Chaudhury, York University; Ingrid Ockert, Princeton University

Television has long been a site of impermanent knowledge production in societies all around the world. Marxist philosopher Louis Althusser linked the mass appeal of television to his notion of Ideological State Apparatuses, whereby ideological hegemony could be achieved and reinforced through its programming. Conversely, according to film theorist Andre Bazin, each shot in film was a revelation of God expressed through images of creation. While scientific educational programs have aimed at creating public awareness of science, fiction-based television programming has also been equally responsible for creating new ways of thinking about scientific practices and technologies in a rapidly changing political, ecological and social landscape.  As historian David Kirby has suggested, television allows viewers to virtually witness science. Yet, the impermanence of the medium also leads viewers to question the supposed objective reality of science. This panel seeks to explore the ways television programming has co-produced social imaginaries and situated knowledges in a variety of realms and societies, and the ways in which television programming and their appeal can teach us about the salience of specific public imaginations concerning the state of the world, the presentation of varying knowledge systems from feminist, postcolonial, indigenous and other ideological standpoints. We are seeking to create a relatively informal discussion regarding the impacts of television programming on science, science research and education and the field of science and technology studies itself.

4. Placebos, Nocebos, and the Contradictions of (In)Sensible Biomedicine

Organized by: Ada Jaarsma, Mount Royal University; Suze Berkhout

We propose an open panel that brings together STS thinkers who share an interest in the work of placebos/nocebos in biomedicine and other realms of scientific research. Placebos (and their sinister twin nocebos) proffer compelling sites at which to dig into the conference theme, (In)Sensibilities. On the one hand, placebos are solicited by pharmaceutical and medical research as a way to purify treatments from noisy contaminants; new drugs enter the market because they emerge, triumphant, out of placebo-controlled trials. This triumph depends upon the demonstration of the insensibility of efficacy: a drug works because of its contrast with overly sensitive placebos, not because of its own entwined sensibilities. On the other hand, placebos index the very sensoria of biomedicine (and other forms of scientific practice) that placebo controls seek to block. Placebos include white lab coats, prescriptions and brand-name pills, and placebo effects mark these highly potent and sense-able ingredients of medical practice. Indeed, drugs work—and work better—because of placebos. Nocebos, in turn, include signed consent forms outlining potential treatment side effects; nocebo effects demonstrate that sensibilities can harm, as well as heal. This panel seeks to explore the contradictions between the (in)sensible ambitions of biomedical treatment and the sensible workings of placebos and nocebos. Papers might examine the insights of science studies scholars like Isabelle Stengers and Vinciane Despret into the conceptual import of placebos. They might draw out the significance of work by scholars like Joseph Dumit into the technological use of placebos in biomedicine.

5. IPBES and Sensing the Politics of Biodiversity

Organized by: Aleksandar Rankovic, Sciences Po; Alice B. M. Vadrot, University of Cambridge

The Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), sometimes referred to as the "IPCC for biodiversity", released its first assessments in 2016, with several others on the way. Compared to previous international assessment mechanisms on biodiversity, IPBES innovates in its ambition to integrate a great diversity of academic and non-academic knowledges, thus potentially rendering it more sensitive to the various worldviews and framings that can be found in biodiversity debates. How this has been translated into practice and has influenced the works of IPBES, how these works influence biodiversity politics and policies, and what this teaches us about the politics of biodiversity more generally, require collective stocktaking and reflection.  This panel welcomes papers on three themes. The first theme is how IPBES makes itself sensitive – or not – to certain types of issues, knowledges, worldviews, and how this is reflected both in its procedures and its productions. The second theme concerns the impacts, potential or actual, of IPBES on biodiversity debates, policies and conservation. Accounts of how IPBES releases have been mobilized in different contexts are especially welcome. Despite its young age, IPBES has already been the object of a relatively important number of works. The third theme concerns analytical and/or reflexive accounts on the literature dealing with IPBES, especially in STS, with a particular attention to identifying the questions that have been investigated so far on IPBES, and those that have not. An intertwining of the three themes in the papers is of course welcome.

6. Feminist STS Analyses of Reproductive Medicine, Technologies, and Practices

Organized by: Alina Geampana, McGill University; Skye Miner, McGill University

This panel is centered around applying feminist STS perspectives to the study of human reproduction. Papers will explore how reproductive practices and artifacts are shaped by personal and cultural meaning while being at the same time embedded in local, national and transnational politics. Feminist STS authors have drawn attention to social inequalities perpetuated through the use of assisted reproductive technologies, new forms of contraception, prenatal genetic testing, as well as other reproduction-related practices impacted by new scientific and technological developments. We seek to further conversations about reproductive medicine and how it can both reinforce and challenge existing inequalities. This panel will give particular emphasis to the ways in which contraception, fertility, pregnancy, and birth intersect with identity categories such as gender, class, race, and sexuality. Critical perspectives on the role of government and public policy will also be central to our inquiry, but we will remain attentive to the health issues, needs and lived reproductive experiences of individuals across different contexts. Following this line of inquiry we aim to situate feminist perspectives on reproductive politics into larger STS frames such as biopower and biomedicalization, while at the same time problematize the implications of ideologies and policies for reproductive practices across the world. We welcome submissions from scholars who explore historical and current power dynamics that shape reproduction in global contexts.

7. Making Sense of Conferences

Organized by: Alison Cool, University of Colorado Boulder; Baki Cakici, Goldsmiths, University of London; Nick Seaver, Tufts University

Ethnographic work in science and technology studies often involves doing research in and at conferences, public consultations, meetings, symposia, lectures, seminars, research presentations, and other formal social gatherings. What are the ethnographic challenges and theoretical possibilities of these kinds of field sites?  What methods and ethics are appropriate for these venues? We invite papers exploring the ethnography of conferences, as both a methodological and theoretical concern. Possible topics include the role of language, e.g. English as a professional language, speech genres, code-switching, visual aids, multimodal communication, humor; Conference presentations as performance and ritual, performing science and expertise, doing things with (scientific) words, Q&A as interaction ritual; Conference sociality, including rules and habits of conferencing, conferences as rites of passage, conferences as gendered and racialized spaces, conferences as spaces for work and play, conferences as non-places, sociality of teleconferences, livestreaming, and new conference formats; Stratification, hierarchy, and status, e.g. scheduling of panels, role of discussants, grad student panels, the role of economic and social capital for access to conferences; Conference Materiality, e.g. the significance of programs, badges, tote bags, business cards, mugs, swag, and other artifacts; The role of the conference ethnographer, including participant-observation and reflexivity, conferences as public/private spaces, informed consent and ethics.

8. Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Technocence: STS meets World-Ecology

Organized by: Andrzej W. Nowak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland; Jason W. Moore, Binghamton University SUNY; Krzysztof Abriszewski, The Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń

The goal of this panel is to explore the trialectical meeting of STS, Anthropocene and Capitalocene approaches. The concept of the Anthropocene and its planetary scale challenges STS myopia and ethnographic methodology. This is the first tension – between a global (planetary) scale of thinking and a local methodology of research. But there is a second, more important tension: standard interpretation of the Anthropocene offers a very Eurocentric and depolitized approach to history. The switch from Anthropocene to ‘Capitalocene’ forces us to reconsider a more politically historically situated starting-point: “The Capitalocene signifies capitalism as a way of organizing nature—as a multispecies, situated, capitalist world-ecology” (Jason W. Moore). World-ecology analysis (an ecological version of World-System Analysis) combined with STS gives us an opportunity to engage in a strictly critical, “glocal” situated analysis. There is also the third tension between science as expertise in the dominating Anthropocene narrative, and the hot, fragile and complex science as viewed by STS. We propose our panel as a trialectical research platform which will allow us to rethink and "unthink” concepts of development, innovation, knowledge, technoscience, nature and capitalism. We would like to focus on the mutual (re)creation of knowledge (technoscience), nature and capitalism. For the panel we propose the following areas to explore:  methodological and ontological analysis of holistic/ecological ontology of human societies (oikeios ontology); the future of structures of knowledge challenged by the Anthropocene/Capitalocene; methodological discussion about possible situated and critical “glocal” research; relations between technoscience and capitalist appropriation of Nature; sociohistorical analysis of anthropogenic and technoscientific (re)creation of Nature; possible use of Anthropocene as a Utopian rather than descriptive term.

9. Sensibilities and Responsibilities in Research and Innovation

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10. Science out of Comfort:  Ethics as an Act of Violence

Organized by: Anna Croon Fors, Umeå University, Sweden; Eva Svedmark

Discomfort, disturbance, disharmony and disgust tend to provoke traditional science and research, bringing about questions of truth in relation to what is to be seen as emotional contamination of results and knowledge production. But what if uncomfortableness is the deal breaker for training our sensibilities and judgement as an important compass of care and ethics? What if the disharmony is an important act of violence when performed on norms and discourses of hegemonic power? Aligned with the theme of this annual meeting we invite contributions that reflect on the extent and limits of our sensibilities as STS scholars, teachers, and activists. We especially seek contributions that speculate on and figure concepts like ”dirt", "the uncomfortable" and "matters out of place” in order to attain new critical sensibilities through composition, intra-action and critical reflective practices.  With the theme Science out of Comfort, we would like this panel to offer a track of contributions that explore phenomena and concerns that antagonize and ruffle in order to break free — in order to feel and sense how the world is made differently sense-able through multiple discourses and practices of knowledge-making, as well as that which evades the sensoria of technoscience and STS. We welcome contributions that explore how alternative forms of knowledge production can support new critical sensibilities in which disturbances and uncomfortable affects and emotions are used in order to slow down and make room for critical reflection and attention.

11. “Hidden Disasters”: Unexposed Element(s) of Sociotechnical Accidents

Organized by: Anto Mohsin, Northwestern University in Qatar

STS scholarship has shown that many sociotechnical disasters expose the messiness of our technological world, display the tight interdependency of society and technoscience, and reveal the vulnerabilities of our risk societies. While we have gained crucial insights on the nature of disasters, such as that there is no such thing as “natural” or “technological” disasters but only sociotechnical ones, and that understanding the politics of disaster matters in how the disasters are handled and managed, sometimes there are elements of a disaster that remain hidden, unclear, or unexplained. They may include the unexplored circumstances that led to the disaster, the “actual” causes of a “natural” disaster, the plight of the disaster victims, or a “hidden” agenda behind a disaster’s cleanup and mitigation efforts. Included in this category is “unexpected disasters,” i.e. unpredicted catastrophes that resulted from the specific construction and organization of our sociotechnical systems. This open panel invites paper abstracts that critically examine unexposed factors of a disaster and/or the explanation of why these elements were initially “hidden,” or of disasters that occurred “unexpectedly” as a result of a specific arrangement and management of a sociotechnical system.  Paper abstracts that compare two of these so-called “hidden disasters” are also welcome.

12. Racism and Health: In/sensibility of Embodied Inequality and Inclusion

Organized by: Anne Pollock, Georgia Tech; Melissa Creary, University of Michigan; Jonathan Metzl, Vanderbilt University

Both racism and health are in/sensible: elusive to define and measure, and yet urgent and palpable.  What can scholars in science and technology studies contribute to understanding how racism and health intersect in science and in society?  This open panel welcomes a broad range of approaches to this question.  Papers might explore how social inequality becomes materially embodied; how scientists and social justice advocates mobilize data about the impact of racism for antiracist projects; the future of identity politics for health in shifting political landscapes in specific countries and transnationally; the epistemological practices of biological and social sciences that make truth claims about racism and health; the roles of pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, and other technologies in ameliorating/exacerbating inequality; the ways that pseudo/scientific racial narratives operate within and beyond scientific spheres; and much more. This open panel invites papers that make empirical and theoretical contributions to the intersectional, interdisciplinary viewpoints of how racism (not just race) alters modes of technoscience, knowledge production, and governance around health. It seeks to generate new networks and conversations among STS scholars to interrogate these vital questions.

13. Sensing Robots

Organized by: Arne Maibaum, TU Berlin; Dr. Andreas Bischof, TU Chemnitz

To explore how the world is made ‘sense-able’ it is worthwhile to look at how we build technology that is supposed to coexist in everyday lifeworlds. Recent developments in robotics are challenging this question. Whether commercial products like “Jibo” or academic endeavours, robots will inhabit our homes and workplaces. Sensing the world is crucial for this undertaking, e.g. the widespread “sense, plan, act” robot control methodology. In order to cope with human environments, robots can not only ‘see’ and ‘hear’, they possess senses beyond that, eventually also beyond human capacity. We want to discuss how and what robots for everyday worlds sense, and how that might change the sensing of and in these social worlds. These questions relate to comprehensive perspectives on science and technology. What are robots supposed to sense? Which knowledge of the sensible world is thereby inscripted into robots? Which concepts of sensing constitute robotics? How are usage scenarios and users thereby pre-scripted? How is the perceptible world made into a laboratory? And beyond this, what knowledge about the world is created while building such sensible artifacts? Furthermore, we learn about our own (in)sensibilities when we examine the design and construction of robotic technology mediating perception. What does STS perceive of robotics as practice? Do we have the methods and theories to address the blind spots of the sensing machines? What are the epistemics of robots sensing everyday worlds? How does STS reconstruct sensing robots (including material practices; technical limitations)?

14. Booms, Buzzes and Busts in Science and Technology Studies

Organized by: Leo Matteo Bachinger, Lee Nelson, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Surveying STS conference programs, one finds what could be described as ‘booms’ followed by ‘busts’ of areas of research. This track invites papers to reflect on this phenomenon and to address questions concerning the epistemological, political, and marginalizing implications for our field. Potential themes include: Conceptualizations – What is an adequate conceptual language to address such phenomena in their diversity, emergence and unfolding? Marginalizations & Boundaries – How do booms/busts allow for, open up, and foreclose fields of engagement? What makes some topics boom and sustain while others bust? And to what extent does the language of “booms” and “busts” itself co-produce and/or erode those margins and boundaries? Temporalities & Epistemologies – Does the field shift temporarily? Is there a lingering alteration to types of considerations required of the field? What makes objects of concern stick/disappear, to what consequence? Failure, Learning, Developing – Should “booms” be considered alliance and bridge formations, while “busts” are a failure of sustained engagement? Or do booms indicate ‘consciousness raising’ while busts indicate that lessons have been learned? Epistemological and Political Consequences – What happens when a field or topic is “mined off”? How does (over/under) saturation ‘matter’?  Hopes, Desires, Responsibilities – Do our booms and busts reveal disciplinary desires, and political and epistemological stances & responsibilities?  Rather than being a track on the phenomena of ‘the new’, we ask for contributions concerning the long term effects of the ‘booms,’ reflections on topics that ‘bust’, and assessments of the mode with which the field of STS shifts. This track hopes to integrate presentations with a workshop approach, prioritizing discussion.

15. Cold War Science, Technology, and Policy: The Americas in a Global Perspective

Organized by: Barbara Silva, Universidad Catolica de Chile; William San Martin, MIT / UC Davis

As part of a broader public concern regarding the intersections between science and politics, approaches from the social sciences and humanities to the study of knowledge production and transfer have increased during the last decades. Cold War historians have expanded traditional political and social histories and integrated scientific knowledge as a critical element shaping the geopolitical dimension of the Cold War on a local and global perspective. Similarly, History of Science, STS, and Policy Studies have uncovered new questions about the means and mechanisms that produce, transfer, and transform expert knowledge within communities and political systems at different scales. While entering a post-Cold War global order, these approaches raise several interrogations about the intersections between science, technology, and policy in the 21st century. Examining Cold War politics and its aftermath can bring significant insights to understanding the origins and developments of current issues concerning science, technology, and policy.  How can STS, History of Science, and Cold War Studies better contribute to ongoing debates on public policy in a national and transnational level? What interdisciplinary dialogues and bridges are still needed to inform citizens and decision-makers on a local and global scale? Using the Americas as a case study, this panel examines theoretical, methodological, and epistemological problems combining History and STS to the transnational study of science, technology, and policy during the 20th and 21st century.

16. Exploring Prediction: Fortunetelling, Prognostication, and Futurism

Organized by: Yuh Chern Lin, National Tsing Hua University

In popular understanding, predicting the future is usually associated with superstition. However, predicting is not simply nonsense; it builds complex relations among science, bodies, and culture thus constructing and revealing systems of nature and society. For example, in some eastern Asian societies, fortunetelling is a knowledge system that simultaneously draws on traditional understandings of nature and the body, medical science, and social values. The fortuneteller is like a mediator establishing a network of understanding among nature, society, the body, and the self. In other words, predicting can be a perspective for revealing the human-nature relationship.  In this panel, we are looking for papers treating prediction as an embodied, technical, and culturally embedded practice for revealing the human-nature relationship. Papers could address a range of questions, including:  What factors contribute to and are shaped by predicting practices? How do predictors’ and recipients’ flesh matter in predicting? What are cultural, material, and scientific bases of predicting and how do they work? How do the practices and skills of predicting configure and reconfigure predictors, customers, and predicting itself? Who are the actors and the actants in the network of predicting? What is the politics of predicting? What kind of the human-nature relationship does predicting establish? Who counts as a legitimate predictor and who does not? Through those questions, we are seeking STS perspectives that revisit the human-nature relationship in fortunetelling, prognostication, and futurism.

17. Contested Meatspace(s): Cultured Meat, Cellular Agriculture and the Futures of Foods

Organized by: Benjamin Wurgaft, MIT (Visiting Scholar); Neil Stephens

In 2013, a Dutch physiologist unveiled the first hamburger grown through cell culture techniques. This international media event created great interest in "cultured meat" and other "cellular agriculture" technologies (including “cultured milk” and “cultured egg whites”), presented as "foods of the future" against a backdrop of climate change and the pressing need for sustainable alternatives to industrial animal agriculture. The event also renewed interest in other protein alternatives, including plant-derived meats and insects. Promoted by entrepreneurs, scientists and other actors, these foodstuffs combine biotechnological innovations, including tissue engineering and synthetic biology, with powerful moral claims. We are told that cellular agriculture could save us from a wide range of crises, ranging from climate change, to animal welfare, to human malnutrition. In this panel we will use the tools of Science and Technology Studies to examine these novel foodstuffs that seek to use laboratory technique to replace animals and their farmers in livestock production; we will also examine the social, cultural and economic systems, out of which these foods emerge. Papers may focus on any of a variety of topics, ranging from the role of stem cells (drawing from the growing literature on stem cells from anthropological and STS studies of medicine), to the way "cultured meat” has enabled the re-imagining of human-animal relations, to the way foods of the future might change how we understand “edibility formation,” or the criteria by which humans define things as worthy "food."

18. Frontiers of Climate Change and Extinction: Rendering Worlds Familiar and Strange

Organized by: Annette L. Bickford, York University

How are frontiers (for instance, the “new frontier” of Mars, the Arctic as the “final frontier”) being identified, and what are the transnational politics of access? How are innovations in science and technology informing ways in which frontiers are being interpreted and actualized as accessible, and how is that access variously framed politically, economically and ethically? How is climate change an ethical boundary involving social structures and behaviors? This panel seeks papers that probe the intersection of frontiers, climate change, technoscience and exploration, bringing new perspectives to the rendering of worlds familiar and strange. Papers may include a wide range of subjects, including indigeneity, extinction tourism, governmentality, travel, resource extraction, neoliberal capitalism, markets, technologies, “vanishing” people and worlds, national identity, alterity, migration, neocolonialism, media, cultural policies, cultural memory, civilizationist rhetoric, human exceptionalism, spectacle, performativity, the politics of spectatorship, and the interplay of “nature” and “culture”.

19. Getting Past Inevitablist Despair:  On Guerilla and Action EthoEcologies

Organized by: Brian Noble, Dalhousie University

Isabelle Stengers has challenged us to think with the matter of catastrophe as our in situ condition of possibility.  This open forum asks:  how best do we act as scholars when met with insensibilities — the conditions of indifference and incapacitation — that can so easily arise in the face of dire, wordly inevitablisms?   Some are finding the means to act, and to think of new ways to act.  Those actions — spontaneous, coordinated, interventionist, relational, responsive — are what we seek to contour in the contributions to this forum.  Very recent technoscientific and political ecological conditions put our faith in scholarly efficacy at bay.  We face such conditions in massive, diverse, distributed and highly destructive human-wrought ecological disruptions: the seemingly unhalting appetite for fossil fuel extraction and distribution and consumption, the proliferation of environmentally toxic effluents, climate disruption at the faltering of photosynthetic carbon sinks, worldwide viral and microbial epidemics, the election of autocratic racial-nationalist leaders, exclusionary extractive-profit-at-all-cost governments in erstwhile neoliberal-democratic states. This forum considers what to do with this conundrum,  and what kind of projects are appearing on the horizon that defy such inevitablisms, generating hopeful, sustainable means to act, against the ground of widening catastrophe. Contributions may take on any or all of:  a) the conditions that lead to such insensibilities, b) the very experience of such incapactiation and suffocation, and c) the lines of flight and triggering to new modes of action and intervention in responding to such conditions and their attendant insensibilities.

20. Can Improved Science and Technology Mean Progress? More Intelligently Steering Technoscientific Systems

Organized by: Michael Bouchey, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Taylor Dotson, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

Must technoscientific “progress” proceed so technocratically? Dominant innovation discourses implicitly support the view that scientific knowledge and technological innovation automatically translate into improved living. Such a view has led to the promotion of “permissionless innovation,” an ideology that legitimates a hands-off approach to the “disruptive technologies” designed by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and freedom of research in their R&D departments. However, scholars have shown that sociotechnical innovations typically benefit some people and organizations more than others. Thus it is clear to many within STS that those wishing to enact non-technocratic visions of progress face social as well as technical barriers. To mitigate or head off the worst consequences of permissionless innovation and other discourses that naturalize the politics of technoscientific change, scholars must consider alternative ways of steering technoscientific agendas, aside from allowing small groups of politically and financially powerful elites to make most of the decisions. How might new technologies and research programs be shaped to be more suitable for public purposes before markets let them loose into the world?  The purpose of this panel is to explicitly examine what would be required to guide science and technology toward better fulfilling more humans’ needs more of the time.  Possible topics include, but are not limited to, mechanisms for slowing the pace of technoscientific change, addressing the privileged position of particular decision-makers, counteracting the subtle effects of “permissionless innovation” and other naturalizing discourses, and better enabling lay citizens and experts to critically probe the politics of innovation.

21. Democracy, Science, and Technology

Organized by: Sandra Braman, Texas A&M University

Interactions between democracy, science, and technology run in both directions.  From the appearance of the democratic state, the very field of statistics developed in support of evidence-informed policy-making, constitutions and statutory law support intellectual property rights based on the belief that innovation is critical to state capacity, and governments have been involved in the practice of and funding for science and technological innovation.  More recently, we have seen the rise of demands for democratic participation in decision-making about the funding of "big science" and the use of research findings, and both citizen scientists and scientist citizens have become important roles. Recent political trends, however, appear to be breaking these relationships.  Policy-making is increasingly evidence-averse – or evidence-hostile – with consequences that touch the fundaments of society and the environment.  Shifts in funding and in regulation of science and technology threaten to undermine knowledge production and use.  There is again the possibility that taking particular scientific positions may be treated as a political rather than intellectual matter.  Already some scientists are declining to cross certain borders because of fear generated by political developments. This panel will look at relationships between democracy, science, and technology as they have been in the past, as they are in the present, and as they may be in the future.  Papers dealing with the problem of developing arguments and evidence that will be persuasive in what The Economist described as a "post-truth" environment, hostile to facts and to reason, are particularly encouraged.

22. The Ethnographic Effect: Imagining a Next Generation of Methodological Possibilities

Organized by: Brit R. Winthereik, IT University of Copenhagen; Andrea Ballestero, Rice University

STS scholarship draws on two distinct methodological imaginaries when considering how it produces knowledge. On the one hand there are detailed, meticulous and somewhat prescriptive guidelines to data collection, production and analyses sanctioned by particular scholarly communities. On the other hand, we find theoretically innovative descriptions of results based on methodological tactics that privilege unruly, creative and improvisational approaches.  This panel invites scholars who wish to explore the space in between these two families of methodological approaches. It begins from the assumption that while academic knowledge production depends on methods and theories, unruliness and creativity are intrinsic to their emergence. We hope to recuperate the notion of the exercise as an embodied space of rediscovery while excising from it the idea of “mastery.” Whether being carefully designed or invented on the fly, exercises unleash intuition, invention and recuperation of generative traditions. Exercises enable the conditions for the ethnographic effect, which we take to be unexpected journeys with our materials after they have been generated. We invite scholars who have developed their own exercises to discuss the theoretical and political underpinnings of their thinking and doing. We will focus on the ‘mechanics’ of their inventions as well as on how their contributions build upon, expand, interrupt or redirect existing ideas. Recognizing that the promise of mastery is misleading and that methods are both generic and discovered anew each time they are performed, we open a space to consider practicalities and politics of methodological creativity and analytical innovation.

23. (Non)Sense-making in/of Neural Sciences and Technologies

Organized by: Kevin Chien-Chang Wu, National Taiwan University College of Medicine

As neural sciences and technologies evolve, we have observed and experienced an expanding range of discourses on how to make (non)senses in/of them. Although it is hard to differentiate, roughly speaking, “in” is from the perspective of the scientists and technicians about procedures, and “of” from that of the users about products. The open panel calls for STS papers addressing the above issues and, if suitable, with senses of reflexivity. Since the 1980s, there has been an avalanche of static/dynamic neuroimages statistically constructed to explore activities of human brain/mind. It seems that finally we could “see” trans-skull the structure and functioning of brain/mind. These “brain/mind maps” are immutable mobiles that could be transported, shared and examined by all the stakeholders. Critiques and anti-critiques on their deficits include brain v. mind, inside v. outside, inferential distance/indirectness/circularity, artefactual and arbitrary coding and scaling, overly claiming or seduction, etc. In addition to neuroimages, booming up are neurotechnological practices such as brain computer interface, cyborgs, robotics and even the futurist version of nano-bio-info-cogno technology convergence. How neural scientists and technologists construct and construe the (non)senses in/of the technologies are also related to the imaginations we use for self/social governance. STS scholars could not avoid the issues of (non)sense-making because we are embedded in these contextual, net-worked human imaginations as we analyze, critique, and construct relevant discourses. Assembling participating papers with converging and diverging viewpoints, the panel aims at making itself a reflexive testing field of (non)sense-making in/of neural science and technology.

24. Cryo (In)Sensibilities: Reproduction in the Age of Ice

Organized by: Charlotte Kroløkke, University of Southern Denmark

Reproduction has entered a new preservation age: In the face of serious disease, reproductive tissue can be preserved for later use; egg freezing is, at times, offered as a company perk, while men training to become chefs are encouraged to protect their gametes from the heat of the kitchen by cryopreserving them. In Israel, parents can legally inherit their dead son’s cryopreserved sperm, while parents located in the West imagine the products of their fertility travel—the embryo as a frozen sibling temporarily residing abroad. Clearly, preservation technologies radically change our understandings of reproduction, including notions of reproductive time. By enabling people to procreate in other temporalities, preservation disentangles reproductive time from the somatic time of the body, simultaneously reorganizing normative temporalities in ethical discussions, within the law, and in the popular imagination. Meanwhile, preservation opens up new business opportunities such as reproductive/health markets as well as the commercial efforts involving reproductive gamete and tissue banking. This panel welcomes papers interested in the ways that preservation technologies are made to appear (in)sensible within the arenas of bioethics and law, in clinical practices, by freezers themselves, in various commercial entanglements, during different historical points of time as well as in various sociotechnical imaginaries (Jasanoff, 2015).

25. The Poetics of Denial: Knowledge-making and Expertise in a “Post-fact” Era

Organized by: Chloe Ahmann, Raquel Machaqueiro, George Washington University

If pundits are to be believed, we are living in a “post-fact” era—a moment when science and expertise are being thoroughly unsettled. Following the contentious Brexit referendum and the divisive U.S. presidential election, in which “lies” urged but often outstripped “fact checks,” there has been a renewed emphasis on personal belief over extrinsic evidence, on individual experience over scientific consensus. Though these are by no means new developments (STS scholars have long interrogated the conservative distrust of intellectualism, for example), today’s policy worlds seem to invite more boastful denial than their predecessors. In this context, this panel aims to explore the poetics and consequences of such denial. Focusing on processes of knowledge production, inscription, translation, and occlusion, of wordplay and rhetorical evasion, we consider the style of so-called political assaults on scientific sense-making. What techniques are being used, among counterpublics, citizen scientists, and lay audiences, to undercut traditionally expert knowledge? What forms of thinking, knowing, and imagining are offered in their place? What are the technologies of perception that render science politically (in)sensitive, that destabilize its authority, that strategically—even mockingly—defang it? And in this process of unsettling, what role does “common sense” play? This panel invites scholars working on examples of contested knowledge—from climate change and energy to toxicity, polling, and forensic science—to reflect on these questions while also considering the status of “denial” within the humanities. As scholars studying science, expertise, and policy, how is our own sense-making bound up in these debates?

26. Academic Evaluation in an Age of "Post truth"

Organized by: Claes-Fredrik Helgesson, Linköping University, Sweden; Steve Woolgar, Linköping University and University of Oxford; Mario Biagioli, UC Davis

STS has made major contributions in respecifying the key concept of “values”. We can no longer take for granted that values are given or that they straightforwardly determine action. We know instead how much is involved in making, articulating, enacting and manipulating values. In academic work, such practices abound: we know that determinations of academic value involve contingent practices of evaluating, rating and ranking performance. What are the implications of this understanding of academic evaluation in the contemporary situation, where standards of truth are allegedly undergoing significant modification? In a situation of “post truth” (nominated as OD's new word of 2016) what contributions can our pragmatist orientation to evaluation make, and how? Is it possible or important to retain symmetry, impartiality, and agnosticism with a phenomenon which so close to home? Is this simply to replay the contention that critique has run out of steam or are we witnessing the emergence of practices of evaluation that are inherently external to regimes of truth and thus of critique? Can STS make interventions that can make a difference? This panel invites papers which address the practices and transformations of academic evaluation in the age of post truth. These practices include, but extend considerably beyond, the use of diverse metrics and indicators. For example, the panel invites discussion of peer reviewing, grant proposal assessments, paper grading, appointments and promotions, awards and prizes, book endorsements and other professional practices. We welcome papers which discuss more (or less) appropriate future modes of academic evaluation.

27. Interspecies Sensibilities

Organized by: Christena Nippert-Eng, Indiana University Bloomington

This is a panel for those engaged in sense-making activities with, for, and across multiple species. We welcome papers that address the creative design, skills development, and research opportunities of such work as well as the myriad reasons that social scientists might choose to do it.  We especially welcome papers that draw on ethnographic, historical or other humanistic methods to talk about zoos, fields, labs, etc., as critical sites of inquiry, facilitating a rich, transdisciplinary discussion of interspecies research sensibilities.

28. Citizen Science: Beyond the Laboratory

Organized by: Carsten Østerlund, Syracuse University; Gabriel Mugar, Emerson College; Andrea Wiggins, University of Maryland College of Information Studies; Nick Lalone, Penn State University

Citizen science constitutes a rich and fast-evolving arena in the production of scientific knowledge, raising questions that speak to the core of STS scholarship. In its various forms, ranging from expert-driven crowdsourced and participatory sensing models to citizen-driven social and ecological justice initiatives, citizen science offers a rich empirical setting. This track will expand the dialogue around this growing practice of knowledge creation through traditional and cutting edge STS perspectives. Building on STS scholarship exploring the sociomaterial construction of scientific knowledge across settings and methods, we invite researchers to unpack citizen science’s spoken and unspoken sensibilities. Relevant themes include: the entanglement and evolution of technologies and communities in citizen science; the influences of policy, technology, and professional scientific communities on emergent practices of knowledge co-production; the production of novices and experts, and how roles in citizen science are defined and negotiated, tracing information flows between contributors and project leaders; how stakeholders attempt to shape volunteer contribution to fit a particular need; the (in)sensibilities of peer production; how data quality is constructed and reconstructed; and how both formal and informal data quality standards are embodied in practices, technologies, and social structures. Beyond questions of building and deploying citizen science practice, we also invite research that examine how stakeholders resist or repurpose existing models in order to meet their personal needs, the role of traditional and local knowledge in citizen science, and the impacts of scientific disciplines and scientific methods on the perceptions of citizen science practices and products.

29. Community Informatics and Science and Technology Studies

Organized by: Colin Rhinesmith, Simmons College; David Nemer, University of Kentucky

Community Informatics (CI) addresses concepts in the scholarship on computing phenomena regarding how individuals and groups can move from merely experiencing digital connections to deeper relationships, including shared behavior and the formation of community identity. It concerns how local, historical communities are using information and communication technologies in support of their own development goals. As a field focused at the intersection of research and practice, CI provides a unique space to examine how applied conceptual frameworks can guide meaningful work, particularly in the non-profit/public sector, where technologies are involved. As the balance of power among groups is often unequal and resources are used differently, CI presumes a critical need to explore not only how communities access, create, organize, and share information, but also the types and qualities of connections between and among their members and networks. This panel seeks to examine the contributions of CI to STS and vice versa by bringing together scholars at the intersection of both fields. While CI often draws from STS studies, few academic forums have provided opportunities to explicitly consider how the two fields can benefit from each other. Nuanced conceptualizations and robust research designs are needed to advance collaboration between both fields. STS-based theory and frameworks offer promising concepts and approaches to CI research. Likewise, CI’s concern with information systems presents an opportunity to deepen its focus, for example, on the infrastructural concerns within STS. This panel will provide a forum for STS scholars studying any aspect of community informatics, culturally-situated design tools, and appropriated technologies and to share research and exchange ideas about knowledge gaps and strategies for future research.

30. From Disruption to Obstruction: Race, Gender, Economics, and Other (In)sensibilities of Edtech

Organized by: Roderic Crooks, University of California-Irvine; Hemy Ramiel, Bar Ilan University

Edtech, a field characterized by the growing interest of commercial stakeholders in education and marked by a significant increase in private investments, presents itself as the next stage of educational technology, once constantly on the precipice of making fundamental, beneficial changes in education. The application of various techniques of data aggregation and analysis, the introduction of current generations of hardware and platforms into class instruction, and the rise of new kinds of blended public/private/for-profit/non-profit institutions promise, in various ways, to enhance, augment, innovate, disrupt or replace schooling. This technologization occurs amid — and greatly depends on — a vast privatization process in public education around the world, and the growing involvement of national and international policymakers, venture philanthropists, established Silicon Valley concerns, and tech incubators and startups. In their deployment of technological metaphors and digital economy concepts to the already intricate practices of education, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, developers, funding agencies, and others implicated in this domain simultaneously interpret and create the objects they observe. Our panel seeks papers that explore the practices of edtech, with particular attention to the cuts, exclusions, and voids that edtech material-discursive practices create. We welcome papers that attend to concerns occluded or made illegible by the guiding imaginaries of edtech, including (but not limited to) ethical, racial, cultural or gender dynamics of technology use, the inclusion of commercial media in learning, or the incorporation of forms of paid and unpaid labor in the production of educational content.

31. Making Nothing: Institutional Practices of Producing Absence

Organized by: Christy Spackman, Harvey Mudd College; Jennifer Croissant, University of Arizona

How do you make nothing? Brian Rappert and Wenda Bauchspies (2014) suggest that the “potential of what isn’t” not only signals lack, it can alert us to a misplaced presence, foster an appreciation of presence, or even be a presence. A range of scholarship has worked to reveal, unveil, or make present that which is normally unseen, yet the actual making of absence, and its affects and effects, remains under-examined. Many institutions routinely practice erasure: courts erase debts through bankruptcy; websites disappear; engineering firms design to remove noise from buildings and vehicles; food scientists mask off flavors in foods or medicines; environmental crews “clean up” toxic spills; corporations swallow each other, then let entire arms of production “die” out. These erasures are rarely complete; traces obdurately remain of the someones, and somewheres that make nothing. What types and forms of labor – visible or otherwise – go into the making of nothing? What infrastructures are put into place to enable the making, and circulation, of these nothings? How are meanings emptied out of objects, places, services, and peoples to facilitate global flows (Ritzer 2007)? How does the making of nothing shape aesthetic choices, daily environments, and behaviors (Bourdieu 1979)? Finally, what “hauntings” (Gordon 2008) do these institutional practices of erasure impose on bodies and communities? This open panel invites abstract submissions that explore the techniques, negotiations, practices, and consequences of making nothing as well as practices of mobilization and circulation inherent to these processes of making nothing.

32. Engaging Material Insensibilities and their Political Effects: What Feminist Materialisms Can Contribute

Organized by: Dagmar Lorenz-Meyer, Charles University in Prague; Sigrid Schmitz; Pat Treusch

Feminist materialisms provide a theoretical-empirical framework for accounting for the intra-actions of material becomings and meaning making, e.g. of bodily, technological and social forces, technoscientific research practices and their constitutive apparatuses, including normalizing discourses in the constituting of phenomena. These entanglements suggest that ‘we’ are always implicated in a web of ‘ongoing responsiveness’ (Barad 2007). Material feminisms thereby complicate ethico-political agency and responsibility whose epistemic purchase has also been queried in STS (e.g. Latour 2011). They show that sensing and attending to something also involves disengaging from other agencies to render phenomena sensible; importantly, they focus on the spacetimematterings of the nonrelational, nonparticipative, insensible and inhuman within relationality (e.g. Barad 2012; Yusoff 2013; Schrader 2015). This panel invites contributions informed by feminist materialisms that engage what the sensible-insensible conundrum might mean for our research, teaching and political efforts within the productivist timescapes of technoscience, and how STS researchers become response-able and accountable for their interventions. What research and teaching encounters – even forms of nonparticipation – might be created? When do insensibility and indifference become graspable? And how might they also link to ‘epistemologies of ignorance’ (Tuana 2006) or ‘regimes of imperceptibility’ (Murphy 2004)? How might an attentiveness to the insensible ‘help us think between natures to promote a noncontemporaneous ethics of apprehension’ (Yusoff 2013)? And how can such material agential contributions within intra-actions be made communicable within the STS community and wider publics? 

33. Dynamics of Knowledge: Bioeconomy and Health

Organized by: Maria Conceicao da Costa, State University of Campinas (Universidade Estadual de Campinas); Renan Leonel da Silva, University of Sao Paulo; Susanne Lettow, Freie University of Berlin

Social Studies of Science have been focused on the study of new relationships between health and new technologies. Advances have compounded the perception of the subject, multiplying the controversies and uncertainties: during the last century, changes in the epidemiological profile contributed to the emergence of new diseases and new perceptions on environmental and behavioral risks. In some areas of the sciences, sociological research played an important role in analyzing the implications of the use of scientific knowledge in contemporary society. The field of 'Life Sciences', for example, has a curious 'fluidity' in its disciplinary boundaries, especially over the last thirty years. Its intellectual analysis and its technological content have changed rapidly since the 1980s. The "bios" has evolved towards the production of different technologies of intervention in the biological and intellectual life of human beings. At the end of the twentieth century, production of biological knowledge was changing radically, reproducing new bases and research methods different from the pre-1980 stage. In this sense, the increase in the interactions between biological research and its implications for social life, and biotechnology, emerge as the theme for sociological analysis.  This is evident in the amount of work produced in the field since the 1980s. Some fields of science are quite controversial, and at the same time point to a field of research with a robust market and present issues related to ethics and governance. From this perspective, we propose to discuss the relationship between bioeconomy and health, to allow a deeper understanding of some new technologies and of society.

4S / EASST 2016, Barcelona

4S/EASST Conference Barcelona 2016

August 31-September 3

Welcome to the 4s/EASST Conference Barcelona 2016!

The local committee welcomes you to the joint 2016 4S/EASST conference, held in Barcelona August 31-September 3.  We will collectively explore the ways in which science and technology are increasingly performed ‘by other means’, in a variety of exploratory activities that include the articulation of collectives that do not fit with the traditional actors in science and technology, or in ways that problematize the established value systems involved in the production of knowledge and technologies.  We hope you will engage with amazing presentations, share your research and ideas, create fruitful networks and enjoy the city!

Visit the official conference web site at http://www.sts2016bcn.org/. View a photo album.

4S 2015, Denver

Denver, Colorado, 11-14 November

Sheraton Downtown

Join 4S for this milestone, 40th anniversay meeting

Program

An interactive online meeting program is now available. You can log in and begin to plan your personal agenda, which can be saved for reference when you are on site. 

Alternatively, you can download the Complete Print Program PDF and/or the Program with Abstracts (275pp PDF).

Please note that the online program is the most authoritative and up to date.

Program Highlights

Download the Program Highlights PDF with speaker bios and prize presentation summaries, as well as Making & Doing presentation summaries.

Wed. 6:00 to 7:30: Presidential Plenary

Eight scholars reflect critically on issues 4S members face in the formation and ecologies of STS practitioners, examining the consequences of STS pedagogies, curricular designs, and learning practices for learners who may not seek the Ph.D. or career identities as researchers. 

Ulrike Felt (U Vienna, Austria)

Kim Fortun (Rensselaer, USA)

Yuko Fujigaki (U Tokyo, Japan)

Bruce Lewenstein (Cornell U, USA)

Noortje Marres (Goldsmiths U London/Warwick U)

Hernán Thomas (U Nacional de Quilmes/CONICET, Argentina)

John Willinsky (Stanford U, USA)

Chia-Ling Wu (National Taiwan U, Taiwan)

Wed. 7:30 - 9:30 pm: 4S Welcome Reception and Celebration of the new 4S journal, Engaging Science, Technology, and Society

Thurs. Noon to 4:00: Making & Doing Sessions

The STS Making and Doing Program aims at encouraging 4S members to share scholarly practices of participation, engagement, and intervention in their fields of study. It highlights scholarly practices for producing and expressing STS knowledge and expertise that extend beyond the academic paper or book. By increasing the extent to which 4S members learn from one another about practices they have developed and enacted, the initiative seeks to improve the effectiveness and influence of STS scholarship beyond the field and/or to expand the modes of STS knowledge production.

View presentation summaries here.

Fri. 6:00 to 7:30: Prize Plenary

Honoring the winners of the 2015 4S prizes, preview at http://www.4sonline.org/prizes

Fri. 7:30 to 11:00: Banquet celebrating 4S' 40th Annual Meeting 

Featuring special guests and surprises, plus French 'Nilla and the Decaf Muchachos

Conference Registration

Registration is now open at the new 4S Members portal. It is not to late to "edit your registration" to add a banquet ticket.

If you have not yet logged in to the new members site but have done business with 4S in the past few years, please use the "Forgot Password" function to retrieve your user name and password. (Note the password sent by email expires within 24 hours. The reset screen will show your user name, which is normally your first and last names, with no spaces. After logging in, you can change your user name to be your email address so you don't have to retain that bit of information.)

Please also note: Having submitted an abstract does not mean you have an account with the members site, as it is not connected to the program database. 

Registration Fees

 

 

Student and non-OECD

Professional

Member

Early 

$170

$270

 

Regular 

$270

$370

Non-member

Early 

$270

$370

 

Regular 

$370

$470

Upon logging in, the site will offer members the discounted rates. If your membership has expired, click "Membership" on the main menu and then follow the "Upgrade your membership" link. (Ignore the "Your membership is current and does not expire" language. It is referring to your guest membership to the web site.) 

Cancellation Policy

After August 15, cancellations will be accepted with a refund of 50%. Any cancellations after September 15 will not receive a refund.

Hotel Information

The meeting takes place at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, 1550 Court Place. Denver, CO 80202. To book a room at the meeting rate of $139, visit https://www.starwoodmeeting.com/Book/SSSS or phone 888-627-8405 and reference 4S or Society for Social Studies of Science.

Exhibitors

The 4S is the oldest and largest scholarly association devoted to studying science, technology and society. The annual meeting attracts over 1,000 scholars. Many attendees look forward to the book exhibit for finding new books for class, for their research, and for staying current in the field. Visit the Exhibitors page for information on how to participate.

Mentorship Program

The Mentorship Program has become a popular part of the 4S conference. The goal of the program is to exchange ideas with junior scholars and support their career development. A mentoring relationship assumes a minimum of one conversation at the 4S conference. It is hoped that mentoring relationships will also continue with at least two follow-up phone calls or emails during the following 12 months. We will match new scholars with more experienced scholars and make an effort to assign mentors outside of one's university. We hope that the mentoring project will allow new scholars to feel more at home in the STS community.

Visit the Mentorship Program registration page for more information and to sign up.

Childcare

Childcare for meeting attendees is available through The Amelia Agency. Reserve in advance at rachel.ameliaagency@gmail.com, or (303) 255-4928.

Travel Support for Students

Travel grant applications for 2015 have closed. 4S administers a travel fund to support graduate student participation in its annual meetings. In addition to the base funding, a special fund was created from proceeds from the 2010 meeting..

Important Dates

Monday, December 15, 2014: Submission opens for open panels

Sunday, January 18, 2015: Submission closes for open panels

Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015: Submission opens

Sunday, March 29, 2015: Deadline for submissions of individual papers, session proposals and movies/videos.

Sunday, May 24, 2015: Acceptance notification.

May 25 – August 9, 2015: Early registration.

September 1, 2015: All presenters must register to be included in the program. For papers with more than one author, one presenter must register to be included in the final program.

September 13: Program posted

Call for Submissions

(Closed March 29)

The Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) invites submissions for its 2015 conference in Denver, Colorado, November 11-14. There is no predetermined theme for the 4S conference. Individual abstracts and proposals for sessions should emphasize how they will make original and timely contributions to any theme relevant to science and technology studies (STS). We welcome papers, session proposals, events, and video or film presentations that are innovative in their delivery, organization, range of topics, and type of public.

New for 2015: Making and Doing Presentations

In addition to paper and session submissions, the 4S invites proposed presentations for a new meeting format and related awards called “STS Making and Doing.”  The STS Making and Doing initiative aims at encouraging 4S members to share scholarly practices of participation, engagement, and intervention in their fields of study. It highlights scholarly practices for producing and expressing STS knowledge and expertise that extend beyond the academic paper or book. Making and Doing proposals include a project description of 400-500 words.   Read the full Making and Doing call for submissions here.

Submission Instructions

Due to the ever-increasing number of submissions and the desire to be as inclusive as possible, each participant will be limited to only one paper or media presentation and one other activity (such as session chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances. Participation in the Making and Doing initiative is not counted toward this limit.

Individual submission abstracts should be up to 250 words. They should include the main arguments, methodology, and their contribution to the STS literature. Paper titles should not exceed 10 words. Please list five key words to assist the program chair to group individual papers into a session. You may choose to submit your paper abstract to an open panel where you would prefer your paper to be included, or you can leave panel selection to the program chairs. You can find the descriptions presented here, broken into three pages for length.

Session proposal abstracts should have a maximum of 250 words. Each session proposal should contain a summary and rationale, including a brief discussion of its contribution to STS. Session proposals should be based on the assumption of one-and-half hour time slots with fifteen minutes per presentation. A typical session may have four papers, one discussant, and open discussion slot. A minimum of three paper abstracts conforming to the above criteria for abstracts must be submitted for a proposed session. The program chair may assign additional papers to proposed sessions to meet the typical session composition. Each presenter in the session must have a user account in the submission system that includes name, affiliation, and contact information.

Submission Deadline: March 29, 2015.

Submit paper, session, and making and doing proposals here.

Open Panels

4S solicited and received proposals for ‘open panels’ (aka 'open sessions'). The purpose of calling for open panels is to stimulate the formation of new networks around topics of interest to the 4S/ESOCITE community. Like any meeting session, an open panel is a paper session with a theme and a responsible chairperson(s). In contrast to traditional session proposals, it is not submitted already filled up with papers. Rather, open panel topics, once accepted by the program chair, are subsequently included in the call for papers, and authors nominate their paper for one or more panels. An open panel may extend across up to three sessions of five papers each (i.e. a total of maximum 15 papers). Proposers of open panels are volunteering to chair a session of papers related to their topic. Open panel chairs will be informed of the submissions to their panel, and will be consulted in determining the panel's composition. But because of the need to distribute paper submissions over many sessions, the program chair has final authority over which papers will be included in the panel.

Contact Info

For information on conference and program practices, acceptance status, and scheduling, contact the Program Chair, Daniel Breslau.

For technical assistance with the submission or registration process, contact the 4S Webmaster.

4S / ESOCITE 2014, Buenos Aires


English Español Portugués

Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y la Tecnología (ESOCITE) and Society for Social Studies of Science (4S)

Buenos Aires, 20-23 August 2014
Intercontinental Hotel, (City Center)

4S Facebook Group  #4s2014

Photo Galleries: Webmaster's      Sulfikar Amir's

Opening Plenary

What is STS for? What are STS scholars for?: Making and doing in STS

Slide Presentations: English -- Spanish -- Portuguese

STS has gained intellectual standing, in part, by critiquing the linear model of knowledge creation, diffusion, and utilization.  Yet 4S and ESOCITE, as professional organizations, have emphasized exactly that by highlighting the presentation of academic papers and the production of articles and books for academic audiences. STS scholars worldwide routinely extend themselves beyond the linear model, formulating and enacting myriad practices of making and doing. Latin American STS scholars have worked, in particular, to demystify the neutrality of knowledge and to show that ‘mainstream’ knowledge does not imply or guarantee social utility. Might it be possible to extend the boundaries of 4S and ESOCITE as professional organizations to more closely approximate what STS scholars actually do? 

This session presents practices of articulating research-based analysis with scholarly activities that draw on that analysis to critically inflect arenas beyond the field.  The critical work of making and doing in STS frequently involves contesting locally dominant images of science and technology.  Every STS scholar arguably develops and enacts reflexive practices, perhaps most commonly by helping students critically analyze their own expertise, identities, and commitments. Many STS scholars immerse themselves and their careers in practices of making and doing, scaling up STS insights through a multitude of projects.

Through successful critical analysis, STS generated for itself the responsibility to formulate, demonstrate, and enact scholarly practices that go beyond the linear model. It is time for 4S and ESOCITE to grant greater visibility to such practices, to advance their scholarly contents and provide prominent occasions for talented scholars to better teach and learn from one another.

In this session, STS scholars alternating between 4S and ESOCITE each have three minutes to describe what they do, how they do it, why they do it, and for whom they do it. They highlight the production and expression of STS knowledge through practices of making and doing. They also map the effects and implications of this work for audiences beyond the boundaries of the field.

Speakers will present in English, Spanish, or Portuguese.  Translations of their presentations will appear in the other two languages on projection screens.

After the session, we invite you to go to the opening reception, introduce yourself to someone you don’t know, and then ask them: What do you do as an STS scholar? How do you do it? Why do you do it? And for whom do ou do it? 

Please continue this exercise throughout the joint meeting.  We hope you’ll build many new attachments that help you both share and improve your own practices of making and doing as STS scholars.

El campo CTS ha ido ganando prestigio intelectual, en parte, por sus críticas al modelo lineal de creación, difusión y utilización de conocimientos. Por cierto, 4S y ESOCITE, como organizaciones profesionales, han hecho hincapié exactamente en eso, poniendo de relieve la presentación de trabajos académicos y la producción de artículos y libros para audiencias académicas. Los investigadores de CTS en todo el mundo se han habituado a ir superando ellos mismos el modelo lineal, formulando y desarrollando una gran variedad de prácticas en sus quehaceres. Los investigadores de CTS en América Latina han trabajado, en particular, para desmitificar la neutralidad del conocimiento y para demostrar que el conocimiento "mainstream" no implica ni garantiza la utilidad social. ¿Podría ser posible extender los límites de 4S y ESOCITE, como organizaciones profesionales, para aproximarnos más a lo que los investigadores de CTS realmente están haciendo?

Esta sesión presenta las prácticas tendientes a articular los análisis basados en investigaciones con las actividades académicas utilizan esos análisis para influir críticamente en arenas que están más allá del propio campo. El trabajo crítico de “hacer CTS” implica a menudo impugnar las imágenes localmente dominantes de la ciencia y la tecnología. Podríamos decir que cada investigador en CTS desarrolla y promueve prácticas reflexivas, con frecuencia ayudando a los estudiantes a analizar críticamente su propia experiencia, sus identidades y sus compromisos. Muchos investigadores de CTS desarrollan sus carreras construyendo, al mismo tiempo, el campo CTS, amplificándolo a través de una multitud de proyectos.

Gracias a exitosos análisis críticos, CTS se ha visto frente a la responsabilidad de formular, demostrar y difundir prácticas académicas que vayan más allá del modelo lineal. Es oportuno que 4S y ESOCITE den una mayor visibilidad a este tipo de prácticas y, profundizando sus contenidos académicos, brinden una importante oportunidad a todos los investigadores para enseñar y aprender mejor unos de otros.
En esta sesión, los investigadores de CTS –que se alternarán entre los de 4S y los de ESOCITE- tendrán tres minutos cada uno para describir lo que hacen, cómo lo hacen, por qué lo hacen y para quién lo hacen. Podrán destacar la producción y la difusión del conocimiento CTS a través de prácticas concretas. También harán una reflexión sobre los efectos e implicaciones de este trabajo para los públicos que están más allá de los límites del campo.

Las presentaciones se realizarán en inglés, español o portugués, las que serán traducidas en los otros dos idiomas en las respectivas pantallas.

Después de la sesión, los invitamos a ir a la recepción de apertura, presentarse a alguien que no conozcan, y luego les pregunten: ¿Qué haces como investigador del campo CTS? ¿Cómo lo haces? ¿Por qué lo haces? ¿Y para quién lo haces?

Les sugerimos que continúen este ejercicio a lo largo de todo este congreso conjunto. Esperamos que ustedes puedan construir muchos y nuevos vínculos que los ayuden a compartir y mejorar sus propias prácticas de “hacer Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad”.

Chairs:

Pablo Kreimer, CONICET - Centro CTS Buenos Aires
Gary Downey, Virginia Tech

Participants:

Bienvenida y breve reseña de ESOCITE. Significado del Congreso Conjunto Pablo Kreimer, CONICET - Centro CTS Buenos Aires

Making and doing in STS Gary Downey, Virginia Tech

Rediseñar el presente: Pensar desde prácticas hacedoras de futuro Tania Pérez Bustos, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

Ciencias sociales, prácticas y CTS: otra(s) forma(s) de situar la producción de conocimiento Leandro Rodriguez-Medina, Universidad de las Americas Puebla / University of Cambridge

ESCT: uma perspectiva latino-americana de esquerda Renato Dagnino, UNICAMP

STS in practice: developing civic science Sara Wylie, Northeastern University

CTS en la era de la globalización Hebe Vessuri, CIGA-UNAM

Fostering "reflexive scientists":  STS education for science graduate students at Sokendai Kenji Ito, Graduate University for Advanced Studies

CTS ¿Cómo responder cuando la complejidad te tiene contra las cuerdas? Alexis Mercado, Universidad Central de Venezuela

Engaging STS Alan Irwin, Copenhagen Business School

La relevancia de los estudios CTS para las políticas y el desarrollo social Rosalba Casas, Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales, UNAM

Material Deliberation in Public Engagement with Science and Technology Kathryn D de Ridder-Vignone, Postdoctoral Fellow, Arizona State University / Assistant Professor, James Madison University

Estudios CTS en América Latina: entre viejos desafíos y nuevas agendas Mariela Bianco, Universidad de la Repulbica, Uruguay

Exnovation — innovation from within Jessica Mesman, Maastricht University

Los estudios CTS en la adversidad Eduardo Robles Belmont, IIMAS, UNAM

Antropofagia e histórias de conhecimento suficientemente respeitáveis Ivan da Costa Marques, Universidade ederal do Rio de Janeiro

Vendiendo el sublime sociotécnico: algunas reflexiones sobre la emergencia de los estudios CTS en Chile Sebastian Ureta, Departamento de Sociología, Universidad Alberto Hurtado, Santiago, Chile

TS on the street and in the court Chia-Ling Wu, National Taiwan University

CTS: La intersección entre políticas científicas y políticas sociales Ronny Viales-Hurtado, Universidad de Costa Rica

Situated intervention: STS experiments in healthcare Teun Zuiderent-Jerak, Linköping University

Estudos CTS para a América Latina ou com a América Latina?  Ou: podem os Estudos CTS servir para situar radicalmente qualquer conhecimento, inclusive os Estudos CTS? Henrique Luiz Cukierman, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

"I study how science changes." Encountering, provoking, and gaming science Joseph Dumit, UC Davis

Problemas ‘glocales’ e inclusión social en América Latina, una lectura CTS Maria Sonsire Lopez, Centro Estudios de la Ciencia. Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas

Embracing discomfort Jane Calvert, University of Edinburgh

Diseñar tecnologías/ Construir sociedad. De la no-neutralidad de los artefactos a la no-neutralidad de los estudios CTS Paula Juarez, Instituto de Estudios sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes

From Bhopal to late industrialism and Disaster-STS Kim Fortun, RPI

Tango Show



Held jointly with ESOCITE

Read a primer on Latin American STS, "Buenos Aires at the Crossroads of STS" Part One. Part Two.

Program

The program is now available. Download the PDF version or browse the program online. You can construct your personal schedule. You can also download the program with all the abstracts.

There is no need to send full manuscripts to the ESOCITE/4S Program Chairs. However, in some cases, session chairs may request the full papers.

Schedule of Events

Tuesday 19 August

Registration Begins Tuesday 19 Aug from 16:00 to 19:00 PM and continues daily, opening at 8:00am.

4S Publications Meeting 13:00-15:00 Tuesday 19 Aug
4S Council Meeting 15:00-18:00 Tuesday 19 Aug

Wednesday 20 August

 8.30-10.30 sessions
10.30-11.00 coffee break
11.00-13.00 sessions
13.00-14.00 lunch break
14.00-16.00 sessions
16.00-16.30 coffee break
Opening Plenary: 16:30-18:00 “What is STS for? What are STS scholars for: Making and Doing in STS”
Opening Reception and Tango Lessons (everyone invited!): 18:00-20:30

Thursday  21 August

 8.30-10.30 sessions
10.30-11.00 coffee break
11.00-13.00 sessions
13.00-14.00 lunch break
13.00 – 14.00 ESOCITE.BR. Dali
13.00-14.00 4S/ESOCITE Student Business Meeting. Soldi
14.00-16.00 sessions
16.00-16.30 coffee break
16:30-18:30 sessions
Banquet and Tango Show: 19.00-23.00pm

Friday  22 August

 8.30-10.30 sessions
10.30-11.00 coffee break
11.00-13.00 sessions
13.00-14.00 lunch break
SSS meeting 13:00-14:00
Engineering Studies  
13:00-14:00
STS-Africa and STS-Asia Pacific meetings 
14.00-16.00 sessions
16.00-16.30 coffee break
Prize Plenary: 16.30-18.30 Monserrat
4S Business meeting: 18:30-19:30
ESOCITE Open Meeting (“Asamblea de ESOCITE”) 18:30-19:30 Monserrat

Saturday 23 August

 8.30-10.30 sessions
10.30-11.00 coffee break
11.00-13.00 sessions
13.00-14.00 lunch break
EASTS meeting 13:00-14:00
14.00-16.00 sessions
16.00-16.30 coffee break
16:30-18:30 sessions

Travel to Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires has two international airports, International Airport Ministro Pistarini in Ezeiza (EZE) and Aeroparque Jorge Newbery (AEP). There are daily flights to Buenos Aires offered by almost all major airlines (American Airlines, United, Iberia, British Airways, KLM, AirFrance, Alitalia, Lufthansa, Aeromexico, Lan, Delta, AirCanada, Swiss Airlines, and TACA, among others). For information about airlines and airports in Argentina, please visit http://www.aa2000.com.ar/aerolineasinternacionales.aspx.

From the airport...

There is no subway or train service from Ezeiza to Buenos Aires downtown, so people will have to use taxis (or “remises”, which is a kind of private taxi) or shuttle services. There are some buses services, but we don’t recommend them at all. They take so much time and you need to know the route very well to decide when to drop off. Besides, they’re usually too crowded to carry luggage.

This is the official website of Ezeiza Airport with information about transfer: http://www.aa2000.com.ar/taxisyremises.aspx

These two sites are also useful, although they seem to be a bit outdated (given the exchange rate they’re using to show fees): http://www.argentinaindependent.com/travel/top-5-ways-to-ezeiza-and-back/ http://airportbuenosaires.com/transportation-from-ezeiza.html

This site seems to be updated and offers info in English: http://www.worldcar-sa.com/welcome.html

Manuel Tienda León is an old company that offers shuttle service from Ezeiza to Puerto Madero (from where people should pick up a taxi). This service is highly safe and recommendable: http://www.tiendaleon.com/articulo/BEZEMAD/

About currency

Our Porteño friends advise us that the unofficial exchange rate for Argentine pesos, obtainable from hotels or independent brokers, is much more favorable to foreign visitors than the official rate obtained through banks and credit cards. The difference can be as much as 50%. The advice is to bring lots of cash and exchange locally. This is primarily applicable to US dollars and Brazilian Real.

If you need a visa...

Be sure to apply for a tourist Visa and not business or conference visa. No invitation or acceptance letter is required for a tourist Visa. Just indicate the hotel or something else about the destination. As migration authorities are not very familiar with academic work, they might interpret it as a business (commercial) meeting.

Important information for attendees living in the U.S., Canada, or Australia

While tourists from the USA, Canada and Australia do not need a visa to enter Argentina, they are charged a so called ‘reciprocity fee’ to enter the country. Fees vary by country of origin ($160 for travelers from the US, for example), but it must be paid online and in advance of arriving in the country. Cash payments will NOT be accepted at the airports.

To pay the fee, you must enter the Immigration Agency web site and create an account with their payment system. Detailed instructions can be found here. You must print your confirmation and present it to the immigration authorities.

Subway/Metro (“Subte”)

The subway consists of 6 lines and 78 stations. The operation of the Buenos Aires Subway starts around 5am and ends around 10pm. Current Rate with electronic card is $A 4.50 or $A 5 in cash.

Buses (“Colectivo”)

There are several bus lines that run through the City of Buenos Aires. The electronic ticket card varies between $A 3.00 and $A 4.00 depending on the distance . Fees paid with coins ranging from $A 6 to $A 8.

Taxi

It’s always recommended to call a taxi by phone or request in the hotel.

Tourist bus

The service of Buenos Aires Bus has schedules and fixed stops with the system Hop On Hop Off. It will be initiated in the first stop at 8:40 hs; while the last exit will be at 19 hs.The frequency will be of 20 minutes and the total extension of the circuit (20 stops) of 3 hours and 15 minutes. In each one of the stops buses will remain few minutes to allow the ascent and descent of the passengers. The tour includes 24 stops which are great tourist points in the City of Buenos Aires. Please visit http://www.buenosairesbus.com for information. The day ticket is $A 170 and the 48hs is $A 230.

Currency

Buenos Aires 's currency is the peso ($A).

Weather

Minimum average temperature in August is 8º C and maximum 17 °C, the average rainfall is 139.3 mm.

Electricity and plugs

All Argentina uses 220v. Buenos Aires plugs have three flat pins, so you need an adapter to use electrical appliances. In the vast majority of hotels will provide an adapter from reception and some have universal plugs.

Official time

The official time in Buenos Aires is GMT -3.

Conference Location & Lodging

Hotel Intercontinental
To book a room at the conference rate, use this e-mail address, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call this phone number: +54-11-4340-7101.

Hotel Intercontinental is in the heart of Buenos Aires, the capital city of Argentina. InterContinental Buenos Aires brings 1930s sophistication and service to Old Town. It’s easy to feel the Argentinean spirit when you’re so close to cultural mainstays such as tango academies, theatres, traditional coffee shops, and the soccer stadium. The financial district, San Telmo, and the famous Calle Florida shopping street are within walking distance.

Conference Registration

Registration is now open.

4S Members...

Log in to receive the member discount! Your user name is your email address. If you don't know your password, use the "Forgot Password" function to reset it. (Note the password sent by email expires within 24 hours.)

Non-4S Members...

Not a 4S member? You will be prompted to create a user account in order to complete your meeting registration. Please note that the 4S registration database is not connected to the program database. (Just because you submitted an abstract it doesn't mean you have an account here.) If you have not done business with 4S in the past few years, you will need to create an account at this location.

Everyone...

Follow the shopping cart process to select options and register for "4S - ESOCITE 2014 Buenos Aires". Note we use "First Name" and "Last Name" for your badge. Please ignore what appears in the "Badge Name" field.

Tango Banquet

Add a banquet ticket during registration to reserve your spot for this exciting Argentine banquet and performance. Space is limited!

Dear Colleagues, it is our great pleasure to announce a one-of-a-kind event that will be long remembered. Dinner & Tango shows in Buenos Aires are typically priced to US$150. The conference team has organized a special banquet on Thursday evening, August 21st, with live music and internationally renowned dancers.

The tango will be directed and performed by Jonathan Flores and Betsabet Spitel, "A pasos de tango" ensemble (Tango Steps). Filete Porteno (Body painting) shown here is by Jorge Musia, a filetero working in the traditional Buenos Aires style.

Dear Members, these are the world champions of stage tango. We have arranged for 4 musicians, 1 singer and the professional dancing partners. After the show there will be a dancing session, milonga, led by dedicated instructors.

Remember, it takes two to tango.

Pablo Kreimer & Leandro Rodriguez-Medina

Payment

Paying for your registration online is much preferred and is far simpler for everyone. If you must obtain an invoice in advance for payment by your institution, see http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/obtaining_and_paying_an_invoice for instructions. Substantial additional fees are required for bank transfers.

Registration Fees

Cancellation Policy: After July 21, cancellations will be accepted with a refund of 50%. Any cancellations after August 11 will not receive a refund.

Fee Type

Member Fee

Non-Member Fee

Professionals

Early: through May 31

$240.00

$315.00

Regular: through June 30

$320.00

$395.00

Late: July 1 and after

$400.00

$475.00

Latin American (working in L.A.) and Non-OECD

Early: through May 31

$190.00

$190.00

Regular: through June 30

$270.00

$270.00

Late: July 1 and after

$350.00

$350.00

Students

Early: through May 31

$150.00

$150.00

Regular: through June 30

$230.00

$230.00

Late: July 1 and after

$310.00

$310.00

 

Important Dates

  • December 18, 2013: Submission opens for individual papers, session proposals and movies/videos.
  • March 3, 2014: Deadline for submissions of individual papers, session proposals, and movies/videos.
  • April 7, 2014: Acceptance notification.
  • April 9 – May 31, 2014: Early registration.
  • June 1 – June 30: Regular registration
  • July 1, 2014: Late registration opens. All presenters must register by this date to be included in the final program. For papers with more than one author, one presenter must register to be included in the final program.
  • July 21, 2014: Final program posted.

Exhibitors

The 4S is the oldest and largest scholarly association devoted to studying science, technology and society. The annual meeting attracts over 1,000 scholars. Many attendees look forward to the book exhibit for finding new books for class, for their research, and for staying current in the field. Visit the Exhibitors page for information on how to participate. http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/exhibitors

Mentorship Program

The Mentorship Program has become a popular part of the 4S conference. The goal of the program is to exchange ideas with junior scholars and support their career development. A mentoring relationship assumes a minimum of one conversation at the 4S conference. It is hoped that mentoring relationships will also continue with at least two follow-up phone calls or emails during the following 12 months. We will match new scholars with more experienced scholars and make an effort to assign mentors outside of one's university. We hope that the mentoring project will allow new scholars to feel more at home in the STS community.

Visit the Mentorship Program registration page for more information and to sign up: http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/mentorship_program

Travel Support for Students

Travel grant applications have been processed and awardees notified. After the meeting, find instructions for reimbursement at http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/travel_grants

Contact Info

The meeting “home page” is at http://www.4sonline.org/meeting.

For information on conference and program practices, contact the Program Chairs, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

For technical assistance with the submission or registration process, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Scientific Committee

Hebe Vessuri (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas / Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México), Hernán Thomas (Universidad Nacional de Quilmes), Olga Restrepo (Universidad Nacional de Colombia), Antonio Arellano (Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México), Noela Invernizzi (Universidade Federal do Paraná), Rosalba Casas (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México), Fernando Domínguez-Rubio (University of California San Diego), Javier Lezaún (University of Oxford), Vincenzo Pavone (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas), Anita Say Chan (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), and María Puig de la Bellacasa (Leicester)

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS (CLOSED)

March 3, 2014: Deadline for Submissions of Individual Papers, Movies, and Session Proposals

The 2014 ESOCITE/4S joint conference will be held in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The general theme of the conference is “Science in context(s): Souths and Norths”, which refers to the opportunity for STS scholars to meet colleagues (and research traditions) from other parts of the world, giving rise to new dialogues and exchanges.

Individual abstracts and proposals for sessions should emphasize how they will make original and timely contributions to any theme relevant to science and technology studies (STS). The Joint Meeting welcomes papers, session proposals, and events that are innovative in their delivery, organization, range of topics, and type of public, and which bring new resources to the STS community to explore these new relations and themes.

Apart from traditional research papers, the Joint Meeting conference also welcomes proposals for sessions and papers using ‘new media’ or other forms of new presentation. This year, we plan to hold special sessions in which presentations are in the form of a movie or video. Movie and video submissions should be related to STS. At this stage, a brief description of the movie/video (up to 250 words) and length will suffice.

Due to the ever increasing number of submissions and the desire to be as inclusive as possible, each participant will be limited to only one paper presentation or movie and one other activity (such as session chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances.

Individual submission abstracts should be up to 250 words. They should include the main arguments, methodology, and their contribution to the STS literature. Paper titles should not exceed 10 words. Please list five key words to assist the program chair to group individual papers into a session.

You may choose to submit your abstract to an open panel where you would prefer your paper to be included, or you can leave panel selection to the program chairs. The call for open panels was issued on November 3rd and received enthusiastic responses from both the ESOCITE and 4S communities. View the full descriptions here.

Session proposal abstracts should have a maximum of 250 words. Each session proposal should contain a summary and rationale, including a brief discussion of its contribution to STS. Session proposals should be designed to fit two-hour time slots. A typical session will contain six papers or five papers with a discussant. A minimum of three paper abstracts conforming to the above criteria for abstracts must be submitted for a proposed session. The program chairs may assign additional papers to proposed sessions to meet the typical session composition. Each presenter in the session must have a user account in the submission system that includes name, affiliation, and contact information. Session organizers can create user accounts on behalf of their authors, if necessary.

Movie and video submissions must draw on STS scholarship. At this stage, a brief description of the movie/video (up to 250 words) and length will suffice.

It is no longer possible to edit submissions. However, it is possible to edit your contact information, up until such time as the data is transferred to the program. Log in at http://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ssss/4s14/.

"Open Panels"

4S and ESOCITE accepted proposals for ‘open panels’. The selected open panels will later be included as part of the formal call for papers. A ‘panel’ is a session of papers that address a shared theme. The purpose of calling for open panels is to stimulate the formation of new networks around topics of interest to the 4S/ESOCITE community. Like any meeting session, an ‘open panel’ is a paper session with a theme and a responsible chairperson(s). The difference is that it is not submitted already filled up with papers. Rather, open panel themes are subsequently included in the call for papers (opening December 15), and authors nominate their paper for one or more panels. An open panel may extend across up to three sessions of five papers each (i.e. a total of maximum 15 papers).

Proposers of open panels commit to work closely with the program chairs to achieve the final composition of their panels, and they must be prepared to chair the panel or suggest colleagues who are willing to do so.


Congreso conjunto
Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y la Tecnología (ESOCITE) and Society for Social Studies of Science (4S)


Del 20 al 23 de Agosto de 2014 | Buenos Aires, Argentina

Hotel Intercontinental

Programa

El programa ya está disponible.. También puede descargar el programa con todos los resúmenes. Alternativamente, navegar por el programa en línea y construir su propio calendario personal.

Calendario de Eventos

Martes 19 de agosto

13.00-15.00     Reunión del Comité de Publicaciones de 4S

15.00-18-00     Reunión del Consejo de 4S

16.00-19.00     Inscripción

 

Miércoles 20 de agosto

8.30-18.30       Inscripción

8.30-10.30       Sesiones simultáneas

10.30-11.00     Coffee break

11.00-13.00     Sesiones simultáneas

13.00-14.00     Receso para almuerzo

14.00-16.00     Sesiones simultáneas

16.00-16.30     Coffee break

16.30-18.00     Sesión Plenaria de Apertura: “CTS, ¿para qué? ¿para quién?: Hacer Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad"

18.00-20.30     Lección de tango (abierta a todos los inscritos)

 

Jueves 21 de agosto

8.30-18.30       Inscripción

8.30-10.30       Sesiones simultáneas

10.30-11.00     Coffee break

11.00-13.00     Sesiones simultáneas

13.00-14.00     Receso para almuerzo

13.00-14.00     Reunión de Science, Technology & Human Values

14.00-16.00     Sesiones simultáneas

16.00-16.30     Coffee break

16.30-18.30     Sesiones simultáneas

19.00-23.00     Banquete y Show de Tango

Viernes 22 de agosto

8.30-10.30       Sesiones simultáneas

10.30-11.00     Coffee break

11.00-13.00     Sesiones simultáneas

13.00-14.00     Receso para almuerzo

13.00-14.00     Reunión de Social Studies of Science

13.00-14.00     Reunión de la Red CTS-África

13.00-14.00     Reunión de la Red CTS-Asia Pacífico

14.00-16.00     Sesiones simultáneas

16.00-16.30     Coffee break

16.30-18.30     Sesión Plenaria de Entrega de Premios

18.30-19.30     Asamblea de 4S

18.30-19.30     Asamblea de ESOCITE

 

Sábado 23 de agosto

8.30-10.30       Sesiones simultáneas

10.30-11.00     Coffee break

11.00-13.00     Sesiones simultáneas

13.00-14.00     Receso para almuerzo

13.00-14.00     Reunión de East Asian Science, Technology and Society

14.00-16.00     Sesiones simultáneas

16.00-16.30     Coffee break

16:30-18:30     Sesiones simultáneas

Inscripción en el Congreso

La inscripción ya está abierta.
Para los miembros de 4S...
Deben iniciar la sesión para acceder al descuento como miembro. Su usuario es la dirección de correo electrónico que indicó. Si no conoce su contraseña, utilice la función " Olvidé mi contraseña" para restablecerla. (Tenga en cuenta que la contraseña enviada por correo electrónico expira en 24 horas)

Paro quienes no son miembros de 4S ...
Si usted no ha participado en actividades de 4S en los últimos años, deberá que crear una cuenta de usuario en nuestro sitio web para completar su inscripción al Congreso. Tenga en cuenta que la base de datos de inscripción de 4S no está conectada con la base de datos del programa. (Haber enviado un resumen no significa estar registrado en el sistema de inscripción)

Para todos...
Siga el proceso de compras para seleccionar las opciones y registrarse en el Congreso conjunto ESOCITE/4S. Nótese que utilizamos "Nombre" y " Apellido" para su tarjeta de identificación. Por favor, ignore el campo "nombre de la credencial" ("Badge Name").

Banquete y espectáculo de Tango

Agregue una entrada para el banquete durante el proceso de inscripción, para reservar su lugar en este emocionante banquete y el espectáculo de Tango Argentino. El espacio es limitado!

Estimados colegas, nos da un gran placer anunciar un evento único en su tipo, que será recordado por mucho tiempo. Una cena con show de tango en Buenos Aires suele costar U$ 150. El equipo del Congreso ha organizado un banquete especial la noche del jueves 21 de agosto, con música en vivo y bailarines de renombre internacional.

El show será dirigido y actuado por Jonathan Flores y Betsabet Spitel, del conjunto "A Pasos de tango".

Estimados colegas, ellos son campeones mundiales de tango escenario. Hemos invitado a 4 músicos, 1 cantante y parejas de baile profesionales. Después del espectáculo, habrá una sesión de baile, milonga, dirigido por instructores especializados.

Hacen falta 2 para bailar el tango!

Pablo Kreimer & Leandro Rodriguez-Medina

Pago
Es preferible y más sencillo pagar su inscripción on line. Si necesita una factura por adelantado para el pago por su institución, consulte en: http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/obtaining_and_paying_an_invoice para obtener instrucciones.
Puede haber un costo adicional para las transferencias bancarias.

Costos de Inscripción
Política de cancelación: Después del 21 de julio se aceptarán cancelaciones con reembolso del 50%. Las cancelaciones después del 11 de agosto no tendrán reembolso.

Tipo de tarifa

Tarifa para miembros

Tarifa para no miembros

Profesionales Senior

Temprano- 9 de abril – 31 de mayo de 2014:

$240.00

$315.00

Regular- 1ro de Junio – 30 de junio de 2014:

$320.00

$395.00

tardía:

$400.00

$475.00

Latinoamericanos (que trabajan en A. L.) y No-OCDE

Temprano- 9 de abril – 31 de mayo de 2014:

$190.00

$190.00

Regular- 1ro de Junio – 30 de junio de 2014:

$270.00

$270.00

tardía:

$350.00

$350.00

Estudiantes

Temprano- 9 de abril – 31 de mayo de 2014:

$150.00

$150.00

Regular- 1ro de Junio – 30 de junio de 2014:

$230.00

$230.00

tardía:

$310.00

$310.00

Fechas importantes

  • 18 de diciembre de 2013: se abre la convocatoria para ponencias individuales, propuestas de sesiones y películas/videos.
  • 03 de marzo de 2014: se cierra el periodo de envío de ponencias individuales, propuestas de sesiones y películas/videos.
  • 7 de abril de 2014: Notificación de aceptación.
  • 9 de abril – 31 de mayo de 2014: Periodo de inscripción temprana
  • 1ro de Junio – 30 de junio de 2014: Inscripción regular
  • 1 de julio de 2014: Se abre la inscripción tardía. Todos los ponentes deberán registrarse para ser incluidos en el programa final. Para ponencias con más de un autor, al menos uno de los presentadores deberá registrarse para estar incluidos en el programa final.
  • 21 de julio de 2014: Publicación del programa final.

Información de contacto

Para información sobre la conferencia y el programa, por favor contáctese con los organizadores Pablo Kreimer y Leandro Rodriguez Medina .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Para asistencia técnica con el envío de propuestas y resúmenes así como con el proceso de registro, por favor contáctese con el webmaster de 4S (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))
Más información en portugués, español e inglés en el sitio web del congreso conjunto: http://4sonline.org/meeting

Ubicación del congreso y alojamiento

Hotel Intercontinental
http://www.ihg.com/intercontinental/hotels/us/es/buenos-aires/bueha/hoteldetail
Para reservar una habitación en la tarifa de la conferencia, utilice esta dirección de correo electrónico, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) o llame a este número de teléfono: +54-11-4340-7101.

Buenos Aires, Argentina, C1091AAQ
Tel: (5411) 4340-7100

El lujo moderno y clásico se funden en la arquitectura de los años 30 de este hotel, en pleno corazón del casco histórico. Descubra su refugio en la ciudad con suites amplias, piscina bajo techo y spa. El hotel se encuentra en una ubicación ideal en el distrito financiero de Buenos Aires y otras atracciones como la arbolada Avenida de Mayo y El Zanjón de Granados, los cuales se remontan a 1830. Disfrute de la cultura argentina en las academias de tango, los teatros y los tradicionales cafés.

Viajar a Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires tiene dos aeropuertos internacionales, el Aeropuerto Internacional Ministro Pistarini en Ezeiza (EZE) y el Aeroparque Jorge Newbery (AEP). Hay vuelos diarios a Buenos Aires ofrecidos por las principales aerolíneas del mundo (American Airlines, United, Iberia, British Airways, KLM, AirFrance, Alitalia, Lufthansa, Aeromexico, Lan, Delta, AirCanada, Swiss Airlines, y TACA, entre otras).

Para información sobre aerolíneas y aeropuertos en Argentina, por favor visite el sitio web
http://www.aa2000.com.ar/aerolineasinternacionales.aspx

Acerca del dinero

Nuestros amigos porteños nos aconsejan que el tipo de cambio ‘no oficial’ de pesos argentinos, que se pueden obtener desde los hoteles o corredores independientes, es mucho más favorable a los visitantes extranjeros que la tasa oficial obtenida a través de bancos y tarjetas de crédito. La diferencia puede ser tanto como 50%. El consejo es llevar una cierta cantidad de dinero en efectivo y cambiarlo a nivel local. Esto es aplicable principalmente a dólar y el real brasileño.

Subte (Metro)

El Subte está formado por 6 líneas y 78 estaciones. El funcionamiento del Subte de Buenos Aires comienza alrededor de las 5am y finaliza altededor de las 10pm. La tarifa actual con tarjeta electrónica (SUBE o monedero) es de $A 4,50 y en efectivo $A 5.

Colectivos (Autobús)

Existen numerosas líneas de colectivo que recorren la Ciudad de Buenos Aires. El boleto con tarjeta electrónica (SUBE) varía entre $A 3,00 y $A 4,00 dependiendo del recorrido. Las tarifas abonadas con monedas varía entre $A 5 y $A 8.

Taxi

Se recomienda siempre llamar un taxi por teléfono o solicitarlo en el hotel o a los asistentes durante el congreso (web)

Bus turístico

El servicio de bus turístico, funciona de forma regular con horarios y paradas fijas y con el sistema Hop On Hop Off. En invierno, inicia en la primera parada a las 9:00 hs., mientras que la última salida será a las 17.20 hs. La frecuencia será de 20 minutos y la duración total del circuito (20 paradas) de 3 horas y 15 minutos. En cada una de las paradas permanecerá detenido durante breves minutos, para permitir el ascenso y descenso de los pasajeros si los hubiese, o bien sin movimientos de personas.El recorrido está armando en base a 24 paradas que constituyen puntos de gran interés turístico de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires. Ingresar a http://www.buenosairesbus.com para más información. El precio regular para un día es de $A 170.

Moneda

La moneda de Buenos Aires es el peso ($A).

Clima

La temperatura promedio mínima en el mes de agosto es de 8 ºC y la máxima 17 ºC.

Electricidad y enchufes (tomacorrientes)

Toda la Argentina utiliza corriente a 220 v. Los enchufes de Buenos Aires tienen tres patillas planas, por lo que es necesario usar un adaptador para utilizar los aparatos eléctricos. En la gran mayoría de los hoteles les facilitarán un adaptador en recepción y algunos cuentan con enchufes universales.

Hora oficial

La hora oficial en Buenos Aires es GMT-3.

Horario comercial

El horario comercial de las tiendas en Buenos Aires es, de forma general, de lunes a viernes desde las 9am hasta las 8pm, y los sábados de 9am a 1pm. En las principales zonas comerciales las tiendas permanecen abiertas los sábados por la tarde.

Apoyos de viajes para estudiantes

Concluido el periodo de revisión de ponencias individuales y sesiones propuestas, se ofrecerán ayudas de viaje para estudiantes de ambas organizaciones.

Miembros de 4S: por favor, visiten http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/travel_grants

Miembros de ESOCITE: oportunamente se informará en el sitio web de la organización.

Comité Científico

Hebe Vessuri (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas / Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México), Hernán Thomas (Universidad Nacional de Quilmes), Olga Restrepo (Universidad Nacional de Colombia), Antonio Arellano (Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México), Noela Invernizzi (Universidade Federal do Paraná), Rosalba Casas (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México), Fernando Domínguez-Rubio (University of California San Diego), Javier Lezaún (University of Oxford), Vincenzo Pavone (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas), Anita Say Chan (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), and María Puig de la Bellacasa (Leicester)

Programa del congreso

El programa preliminar será publicado el 12 de mayo de 2014 y el final será publicado el 21 de julio del 2014.

 

Convocatoria para Presentaciones (Cerrado)

3 de marzo de 2014: Fecha límite para el envío de ponencias individuales, películas/videos y propuestas de sesiones

El Congreso conjunto ESOCITE/4S de 2014 tendrá lugar en Buenos Aires, Argentina. El tema general es “Ciencia en contexto(s): Sur(es) y Norte(s)”, que brinda la oportunidad para académicos CTS de encontrarse con colegas (y tradiciones de investigación) de otras partes del mundo, dando lugar a diálogos e intercambios.

Los resúmenes individuales y las propuestas de paneles deben enfatizar la contribución original y pertinente que hacen a los temas relevantes de los Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y Tecnología (ESCT). El congreso conjunto espera recibir ponencias, propuestas de sesiones y eventos que sean contribuciones oportunas e innovadoras en su forma de exposición, organización, rango temático y tipo de público, y que provean nuevos recursos a la comunidad CTS para explorar estas nuevas relaciones y temas.

Además de las tradicionales ponencias de investigación, el Congreso conjunto aceptará especialmente propuestas de sesiones y ponencias que usen formas de presentación novedosas. Este año planeamos tener sesiones especiales en las cuales las presentaciones sean en forma de películas o videos. Los videos y las películas debe estar relacionadas con el campo CTS y, en este momento, será suficiente una breve descripción de la película o video (hasta 250 palabras).

Debido al número creciente de propuestas y al deseo de ser lo más incluyentes posibles, cada participante está limitado a sólo una presentación de ponencia, película o video y a alguna otra actividad (como responsable de una mesa o comentarista) hasta un máximo de dos apariciones.

Los resúmenes individuales deben tener hasta 250 palabras y deben incluir los argumentos principales, la metodología y su contribución a la literatura CTS. El título de las ponencias no deberá exceder las 10 palabras. Por favor, enliste cinco palabras claves que posibiliten a los organizadores agrupar las ponencias individuales en sesiones.

Se puede elegir enviar su resumen a un panel abierto, o dejar la elección del panel a los organizadores. La convocatoria para paneles abiertos se publicó el 3 de noviembre y recibió una respuesta entusiasta de las comunidades de ESOCITE y 4S (se aceptaron alrededor de 100 paneles). Para ver una descripción completa, por favor visite el sitio web http://www.4sonline.org/open_sessions.

Las propuestas de sesiones también deben tener un resumen de un máximo de 250 palabras. Cada propuesta deberá contener además una fundamentación, incluyendo una pequeña discusión de su contribución al campo CTS. Las sesiones deben ser propuestas para bloques de dos horas. Una sesión típica contendrá seis ponencias o cinco ponencias y un comentarista. Las sesiones deben contener un mínimo de tres ponencias, las que deberán respetar los criterios enunciados para los resúmenes. Los organizadores pueden asignar ponencias adicionales a las sesiones propuestas para cumplir con la composición estándar de la sesión. Cada presentador de la sesión deberá tener una cuenta de usuario en el sistema de envío que incluya nombre, afiliación y datos de contacto. Los organizadores de sesiones podrán crear cuentas de usuarios en representación de los autores si fuera necesario.

Ya no es posible editar las presentaciones. Sin embargo, sí es posible editar su información de contacto, hasta el momento en que los datos se transfieren al programa. Para ello, entrar en http://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ssss/4s14/.

 


Congresso conjunto

Sociedade Latino-americana de Estudos Sociais da Ciência e da Tecnologia (ESOCITE)
e
Society for Social Studies of Science (4S)

20 a 23 de Agosto de 2014 | Buenos Aires, Argentina
Hotel Intercontinental

O programa já está disponível. Você também pode baixar o programa com todos os resumos. Em alternativa, procure o programa on-line e construir sua agenda pessoal.

Fechas Importantes

  • 18 de dezembro de 2013: Abertura da chamada de trabalhos individuais, propostas de sessão e filmes / vídeos.
  • 03 de março de 2014: Término do período de submissão de trabalhos individuais, propostas de sessão e filmes / vídeos.
  • 7 de abril de 2014: : Notificação de aceitação.
  • 9 de abril – 31 de maio de 2014: Período de inscrição antecipada.
  • 1o. de junho – 30 de junho de 2014: Inscrição normal
  • 1o. de julho de 2014: Abertura da inscrição tardia. Todos os apresentadores deverão se registrar para serem incluídos no programa final. Para trabalhos com mais de um autor, pelo menos um dos apresentadores deverá se registrar para.
  • 21 de julho de 2014: Publicação do programa final.

Inscrição no Congresso

As inscrições já estão abertas.

Para membros da 4S...
Você deve acessar o website para obter o desconto dos membros. Seu usuário é o endereço de e-mail que você forneceu. Se você não sabe sua senha, utilize o "Forgot Password" para reiniciar. (Note que a senha expira em 24 horas)

Para não-membros de 4S...
Se você ainda não participou de atividades 4S nos últimos anos, você terá de criar uma conta de usuário em nosso site para completar a sua inscrição para o Congresso. Aponta-se que o registro da base de dados 4S não está ligado à base de dados do programa. (Ter enviado um resumo não implica de maneira nenhuma ser incluído no sistema de inscrição)

Para todos os participantes...
Siga o processo de compra para selecionar as opções e se registrar no Congresso ESOCITE/4S. Note que usamos "Nome" e "Sobrenome" para o seu cartão de identificação. Por favor, ignore o campo "crachá" ("Name Badge").

Jantar e Show de tango

Adicione uma entrada para o banquete durante o processo de inscrição para reservar a sua vaga nesta festa emocionante e no show de Tango Argentino. O espaço é limitado!

Caros colegas, é com grande prazer que anunciamos um evento único, que será lembrado por muito tempo. Um jantar com show de tango em Buenos Aires custa normalmente US $ 150. A equipe do Congresso organizou um banquete especial na noite de quinta feira, 21 de agosto, com música ao vivo e bailarinos de renome internacional.

O show será dirigido e interpretado por Jonathan Flores e Betsabet Spitel, do ensemble "A passos de tango", que são campeões mundiais de tango.
Convidamos quatro músicos, um cantor e dançarinos profissionais. Após o show, haverá uma sessão de dança, milonga, liderada por instrutores especializados.

Necessitam-se dois para dançar o tango!
Pablo Kreimer & Leandro Rodriguez-Medina

Pagamento
É melhor e mais fácil pagar a sua inscrição on-line. Se você precisar de uma fatura para pagamento antecipado por sua instituição, por favor consulte: http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/obtaining_and_paying_an_invoice para obter instruções.

Pode haver um custo adicional para as transferências bancárias.

Taxas de Inscrição

Cancelamento: Após 21 de julho cancelamentos serão aceitos com reembolso de 50 %. Cancelamentos após 11 de agosto não serão reembolsados.

Tipo de tarifa

Tarifa para membros

Tarifa para não membros

Professores/Senior

Antecipada: 9 de abril – 31 de maio

$240.00

$315.00

Normal: 1o. de junho – 30 de junho

$320.00

$395.00

Tardia:

$400.00

$475.00

Latino-americanos (que trabalham em A. L.) y Não-OCDE

Antecipada: 9 de abril – 31 de maio

$190.00

$190.00

Normal: 1o. de junho – 30 de junho

$270.00

$270.00

Tardia:

$350.00

$350.00

Estudiantes

Antecipada: 9 de abril – 31 de maio

$150.00

$150.00

Normal: 1o. de junho – 30 de junho

$230.00

$230.00

Tardia:

$310.00

$310.00

Informações para contato

Para obter informações sobre o congresso e o programa, por favor, entre em contato com os organizadores Pablo Kreimer e Leandro Medina Rodriguez .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Para obter assistência técnica sobre a submissão de propostas e resumos, bem como o processo de registro, por favor, entre em contato com o webmaster de 4S (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))

Mais informações em Português, Espanhol e Inglês no website do congresso conjunto: http://4sonline.org/meeting

Localizaçâo do congresso e Acomodações

Hotel Intercontinental
http://www.ihg.com/intercontinental/hotels/us/es/buenos-aires/bueha/hoteldetail
Para reservar um quarto no a tarifa da conferência, use este endereço de e-mail, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) ou ligue para este número de telefone: +54-11-4340-7101.

Moreno 809
Buenos Aires, Argentina, C1091AAQ
Fone: (5411) 4340-7100

O luxo moderno e clássico se misturam na arquitetura dos anos 30 neste hotel no coração do centro histórico. Encontre o seu refúgio na cidade, com espaçosas suítes, piscina coberta e spa. O hotel está em uma localização ideal na área de negócios de Buenos Aires e outras atrações, como a arborizada Avenida de Mayo e El Zanjón de Granados, que datam de 1830. Desfrute da cultura argentina em academias de tango, teatros e cafés tradicionais.

Viajar para Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires tem dois aeroportos internacionais, o Aeroporto Internacional Ministro Pistarini, em Ezeiza (EZE) e Aeroparque Jorge Newbery (AEP). Há vôos voos diários para Buenos Aires oferecidos pelas principais companhias aéreas do mundo (American Airlines, United, Iberia, British Airways, KLM, Air France, Alitalia, Lufthansa, United Airlines, Lan, Delta, AirCanada, Swiss Airlines, TACA, etc.)

Para obter informações sobre as companhias aéreas e aeroportos na Argentina, por favor, visite o website http://www.aa2000.com.ar/aerolineasinternacionales.aspx

Apoio de viagem para os estudantes

Finalizado o período de revisão de trabalhos individuais e propostas de sessão, será oferecida ajuda de custo de viagem para estudantes das duas organizações.
Membros 4S: visite http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/travel_grants
Membros ESOCITE: será informado no site da organiz

4S 2013 San Diego


October 9 – 12, 2013 — San Diego, California
Town and Country Resort and Convention Center

View photos from the San Diego meeting

Videos from the Presidential Prize Plenary

Gary Downey remarks

Bernal Prize presentation

Fleck Prize presentation

Carson Prize presentation

Pablo Kreimer remarks

Ethnografilm Festival promo

Read the Evaluation Survey summary

Check out the #4S2013 Twitter trail.

Program

Download program Errata sheet.

The final program can be viewed online. Select from the links on the left side of the page.

The final print program can now be downloaded in PDF form.

You can also download all the program abstracts in a PDF file.

Stay Informed

Stay informed while on site by following @4sWeb and #4s2013 on Twitter. Share through the 4S Facebook group, https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/451727395509/.

Conference Highlights

The conference will begin on Wednesday evening with the Presidential Plenary, followed by a reception. All 4S participants are encouraged to attend, to mingle and to converse.

The sessions will officially begin on Thursday at 8:30 am and end on Saturday evening.

Banquet for Everyone: Friday evening will include the 4S Presidential Prize Plenary, followed by a banquet. This year, the banquet is included in the registration fee.

"Good Vibrations" Beach Party and Jam. Thursday evening, travel by bus to Mission Beach for beach party, bonfire, smores, and more. Please also bring your musical instruments and noise machines along so we can have one of the biggest STS jam bands ever. Free, ticket required, space limited to the first 500 who register.

There will be two‘Author Meets Critic’ sessions.

Important Dates

  • December 3, 2012: Submission opens for open panels
  • January 6, 2013: Submission closes for open panels
  • January 23,2013: Submission opens
  • March 17, 2013: Deadline for submissions of individual papers, session proposals and movies/videos.
  • May 12, 2013: Acceptance notification.
  • May 13 – July 28, 2013: Early registration.
  • August 18, 2013: Preliminary program posted.
  • September 15, 2013: Last day to book a room at the Town and Country Resort and Convention Center to get the reduced rate. We recommend early booking since room availability is based on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • September 1, 2013: All presenters must register to be included in the final program. For papers with more than one author, one presenter must register to be included in the final program.
  • September 22, 2013: Final program posted.

Conference Registration

Registration is now open.

Members, log in to receive the member discount! Your user name is your email address. If you don't know your password, use the "Forgot Password" function to reset it. (Note the password sent by email expires within 24 hours.) Please note that the 4S registration database is not connected to the program database. If you have not done business with 4S in the past, you will need to create an account at this location.

Follow the shopping cart process to select options and register for the Annual Meeting. Note we use "First Name" and "Last Name" for your badge. Please ignore what appears in the "Badge Name" field.

Not a member? You will need to register with the web site as a guest in order to complete your meeting registration. Add a 4S membership to your shopping cart along with your registration and the discounted registration rate will be applied during checkout.

Paying for your registration online is much preferred and is far simpler for everyone. If you must obtain an invoice in advance for payment by your institution, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for instructions. Additional fees are required for bank transfers.

Registration Fees

Fees include the Friday Awards banquet.

Early registration ends on 07/28/2013.
Regular registration starts on 07/29/2013 and ends on 10/8/2013.
Late registration starts on 10/9/2013.

Cancellation Policy: After August 15, cancellations will be accepted with a refund of 50%. Any cancellations after September 15 will not receive a refund.

($ US) Students and non-OECD Professional
Member Early 150 250
Regular 225 375
Late 300 500
Non-member Early 195 325
Regular 270 450
Late 345 575

Exhibitors

The 4S is the oldest and largest scholarly association devoted to studying science, technology and society. The annual meeting attracts over 1,000 scholars. Many attendees look forward to the book exhibit for finding new books for class, for their research, and for staying current in the field. Visit the Exhibitors page for information on how to participate. http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/exhibitors

Mentorship Program

The Mentorship Program has become a popular part of the 4S conference. The goal of the program is to exchange ideas with junior scholars and support their career development. A mentoring relationship assumes a minimum of one conversation at the 4S conference. It is hoped that mentoring relationships will also continue with at least two follow-up phone calls or emails during the following 12 months. We will match new scholars with more experienced scholars and make an effort to assign mentors outside of one's university. We hope that the mentoring project will allow new scholars to feel more at home in the STS community.

Visit the Mentorship Program registration page for more information and to sign up: http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/mentorship_program

Travel Support for Students

Applications for travel grants for students are being accepted until June 3. See http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/travel_grants

Conference Location & Lodging

Town and Country Resort and Convention Center (www.towncountry.com/ )
500 Hotel Circle North   
San Diego, California 92108
Tel: (619) 291-7131
Fax: (619) 291-3584
Reservations: To obtain the discounted room rate of $159 /night, point your browser to https://resweb.passkey.com/go/e7f92687
Town and Country Resort & Convention, comprising 32 acres, is next to the 27-hole Riverwalk Golf Club. The University of San Diego, Presidio Park, and the San Diego Zoo are within two miles of this resort. Ocean Beach is five miles away and SeaWorld San Diego is 4 miles away.

Light Rail Trolley Just a short stroll from the Town and Country Resort Hotel will take you to the San Diego Trolley pick-up. The trolley is a great way to get around San Diego when you’re sightseeing, shopping, or going to specific events. Travel by trolley to the Gaslamp Quarter, Old Town, Downtown San Diego, the Convention Center and Seaport Village. You can also reach San Diego’s sporting event venues - Qualcomm Stadium, Petco Park, San Diego State and Viejas Arena by trolley.

Travel to San Diego

By Air

  • San Diego International Airport (SAN), sometimes called Lindbergh Field, is conveniently located near downtown, and most major airlines fly to it.

By Train

  • Amtrak , Station Building (with waiting room), 1050 Kettner Boulevard, San Diego, CA 92101

By Bus

  • Greyhound Bus Station, 120 W Broadway (between 1st Ave & Front St), San diego, CA 92101

By Car

  • Take I-5 from Los Angeles and northern California, I-15 from Las Vegas, and I-8 from Phoenix.

Directions to our San Diego Resort Hotel
Interstate 8 East (El Centro)
Take 2nd Hotel Circle Exit and turn left going under the overpass.

Interstate 8 West (Beaches)
Exit Hotel Circle and turn right.

Interstate 5 North or South
Exit onto Interstate 8 East (El Centro) and exit 2nd Hotel Circle exit, turn left continuing under the overpass.

Interstate 805 North or South
Interstate 15 North or South & Hwy 163. Exit onto Interstate 8 West (Beaches), exit Hotel Circle and turn right.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

The Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) invites submissions for its 2013 conference in San Diego, California. There is no predetermined theme for the 4S conference. Individual abstracts and proposals for sessions should emphasize how they will make original and timely contributions to any theme relevant to science and technology studies (STS).

The 4S conference welcomes papers, session proposals, and events that are innovative in their delivery, organization, range of topics, type of public, and which bring new resources to the STS community to explore these new relations and themes. Apart from traditional research papers, the 4S conference also welcomes proposals for sessions and papers using ‘new media’ or other forms of new presentation. This year we plan to hold special sessions on movies and videos where the main item submitted will be a movie or video. We plan to have a room dedicated to showing of movies. Movies of variable length can be submitted.

Each participant in the conference will be limited to only one paper or movie presentation and one other activity (such as session chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances.

Submission Process

Paper and session submission season has closed. You can still update personal information, such as your email or affiliation, at http://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ssss/4s13/.

Contact Info

The meeting “home page” is at http://www.4sonline.org/meeting.

For general meeting information and any questions about the program, contact the Program Chair, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) , University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. Telephone: 1-505-2777756].

For technical assistance with the submission or registration process, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Obtaining and Paying an Invoice

Find your invoice

You can find a 4S store invoice in you Profile on the 4s members site. After logging in, click on 'Manage Profile' in the right sidebar.

Pay online

You can select the invoice and pay online by Visa or Mastercard.

Pay by check

Send a bank check in US Dollars, payable to Society for Social Studies of Science, to the address below. This option does not require an extra fee.

Dr. Paige Miller
University of Wisconsin-River Falls
Department of Sociology, Criminology, and Anthropology
KFA 326
River Falls, WI 54022 USA

Bank / Wire Transfer Information

Bank Name: Chase Bank

Swift Code:   CHASUS33   (Please note that in some cases XXX must be added after the Swift Code for a successful transfer.)

Account Name: Society for Social Studies of Science

Account Number 1585619032

International Routing Number:    021000021

Domestic Routing Number (also called ABA code):    021000021

Account Contact: Wesley Shrum, Sociology Dept, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 U.S.

Bank Address: 270 Park Ave. New York, NY 10017 

2012 Annual Meeting


October 17-20, 2012, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark
Held jointly with European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST)

Conference photo gallery

Program

The local organizing committee has put together a lively array of activities. for details, see below.

The final meeting program is now available for downloading. (5 Mb PDF)

Alternatively, download the full program with abstracts. (v 9/18/12, 4.5mb PDF)

Schedule at a Glance

Time

Wednesday

12:30 – 19:00

Registration and Fair

14:00 – 18:00

Design and Displacement
Thematic opening sessions:
· Laura Watts, Lucy Suchman and Pelle Ehn
· Anders Blok
· Annemarie Mol

18:00 – 20:00

Reception

 

Time

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

09:00 – 10:30

30 Parallel Sessions

30 Parallel Sessions

30 Parallel Sessions

10:30 – 11:00

Coffee break

Coffee break

Coffee break

11:00 – 12:30

30 Parallel Sessions

30 Parallel Sessions

30 Parallel Sessions

12:30 – 14:00

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

14:00 – 15:30 30

30 Parallel Sessions

30 Parallel Sessions

30 Parallel Sessions

15:30 – 16:00

Coffee break

Coffee break

Coffee break

16:00 – 17:30

30 Parallel Sessions

Presidential Plenary

30 Parallel Sessions

Evening

19:00‐21:00
Reception
Copenhagen City Hall

19:00‐24:00
Banquet: New Nordic
Tasting Buffet
CBS, The Kiln Hall

From Copenhagen to Copenhagenization

At the 4S/EASST conference 2012, the local organizing committee invites you to explore not only the city of Copenhagen, but also the phenomenon of Copenhagenization. This concept refers to the status the city has acquired as a site for experimental design, green city development, and bicycling. When part of Broadway on Manhattan was turned into a bike path, this was talked about as an instance of Copenhagenization. In line with the overall theme of the 2012 4S/EASST conference, Design and Displacement, the local organizing committee wishes to discuss Copenhagen as a socio material space, which constantly evolves through design experiments and their partly unexpected effects.

On Wednesday October 17, we thus attempt to ‘localize’ the conference and address the concept of ’Copenhagenization’ as an example of a range of specific design experiments in relation to city planning and sustainability. We zoom in on interventions in relation to traffic planning, bicycling, culture, gastronomy, etc., and look at how they disturb existing technical, organizational, and cultural spaces. Throughout the conference, we will serve New Nordic food, and on Wednesday there will be tasters and exhibitions about this theme in the registration area.

Local Arrangements

Download these handy arrival and orientation instructions.

The city of Copenhagen was founded more than 800 years ago, and is known for combining the old-world charm of its medieval origins with the vibrant life of a modern European metropolis. Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark, but with merely 1.5 million inhabitants, the city is human in scale. A network of car-free pedestrian zones and cobbled squares creates a lively and attractive downtown area with cafés, cinemas and museums. The high quality public transportation system, consisting of the metro, buses, and trains connects the centre with its suburbs and the airport (a 20-minute ride). Additional information on the conference locale, including lodging recommendations, is available on the special local organizing committee website.

Special Events

Bike ride during lunch break

Thursday or Friday, 12:30-14:00
Max. 100 participants (SOLD OUT)
Price: free of charge

“The Wall”, a visit to an outdoor exhibition at Copenhagen City Museum

The award winning project 'The Wall' is the Museum of Copenhagen's newest interactive initiative. A 12 meter long mobile touch screen, it moves around the city alongside the metro digs and enables the visitors to both upload and scroll through archival material in a vast 3d cityscape, neighborhood by neighborhood, keyword by keyword, or theme by theme. According to the museum website, the Wall was created to 'kindle curiosity in, a desire for knowledge about and a delight in discussing, matters concerning the capital' by creating 'a street level meeting place, where citizens and/or guests to the city can exchange ideas on whatever facets of the city they find interesting'. During 4s/EASST the Wall will be located close to the conference venue by Frederiksberg Runddel and you will be invited to join us for a walk there, visit The Wall's website (http://vaeggen.copenhagen.dk/en/) to take part in the palaver around Copenhagen and copenhagenization, or take a lunch break tour to The Wall with project coordinator Sarah Giersing and curator Jacob Parby Ingemann.

When: in the lunch breaks Thursday and Friday from 12.30-14
Where: we will walk together from the 'The Wall' meeting point at the central conference site at CBS
Registration: Participation is free of charge but capacity is limited. Register here. You will be required to log in.

Exhibition at the Medical Museion:

Medical Museion welcomes you to an early evening about the prevention and treatment of obesity. The evening offers an introduction and a visit to Museion's new exhibition Obesity - What's the problem? STS ethnologist, Astrid Jespersen, will give a short presentation on a research project at the University of Copenhagen, looking to find ways to prevent obesity by stimulating physical activity in everyday life. Visit this historical 18th century building, and take part in a joint discussion on the redesign of bodies through displacement of the internal organs, and on external, socio-political obesity categories.

The museum is located in the former Royal Academy of Surgeons from 1787 and adjacent buildings in Frederiksstaden, a Copenhagen neighborhood which is currently a candidate for inclusion in UNESCO's World Heritage List. The Museum is placed right next to the big Marble church and in walking distance from The Little Mermaid. Additionally, a 10 min walk takes you to Nyhavn, the old center of Copenhagen and home to many good restaurants and the Royal Theatre.

Time: Thursday 18.30
Place: Medical Museion, Bredgade 62 DK-1260 Copenhagen K Getting there: Take subway from Copenhagen Business School (CBS) to Nyhavn and walk 10 min out Bredgade, or take bus 1A or bus 15 from Nyhavn, stops in front of museum.
Registration: Max 70 visitors. Participation is free of charge. Register here. You will be required to log in.

Reception at Copenhagen City Hall

Thursday, 19:00-21:00
Max. 600 participants (SOLD OUT)
Price: free of charge

Banquet: New Nordic tasting buffet and dancing at The Kiln Hall, Copenhagen Business School

Friday, 19:00-24:00
If you are registered for the conference, it is not too late to add a banquet ticket. Use the "Copenahagen Activities" registration page to purchase a ticket.

Conference Registration: CLOSED

Due to an extraordinarily high level of registrations, facilities are at maximum occupancy and the Conference organizers have closed all further registration. We apologise for any disappointment this might cause.

Registration Fees

Fees include buffet lunches, Thursday through Saturday.

Early registration ends on 07/27/2012.
Regular registration starts on 07/28/2012 and ends on 10/17/2012.
Late registration starts on 10/17/2012.

Cancellation Policy: After September 1, cancellations will be accepted with a refund of 50%. Any cancellations after October 1 will not receive a refund.

(USD) Student and non-OECD Professional
Member Early  $170 $290
  Regular  $250 $400
  Late  $300 $500
Non-member Early  $250 $400
  Regular  $350 $590
  Late  $440 $750

Exhibitors

The 4S is the oldest and largest scholarly association devoted to studying science, technology and society. The annual meeting attracts over 1,000 scholars. Many attendees look forward to the book exhibit for finding new books for class, for their research, and for staying current in the field. Visit the Exhibitors page for information on how to participate. http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/exhibitors

Mentorship Program

**We are currently in need of mentors! If you are a faculty member, postdoc, research fellow, or senior graduate student please sign up and meet with a junior scholar in Copenhagen.**

The Mentorship Program has become a popular part of the 4S conference. The goal of the program is to exchange ideas with junior scholars and support their career development. A mentoring relationship assumes a minimum of one conversation at the 4S conference. It is hoped that mentoring relationships will also continue with at least two follow-up phone calls or emails during the following 12 months. We will match new scholars with more experienced scholars and make an effort to assign mentors outside of one's university. We hope that the mentoring project will allow new scholars to feel more at home in the STS community.

Visit the Mentorship Program registration page for more information and to sign up: http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/mentorship_program

Travel Support for Students

Please consult the travel grants page for more information.
http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/travel_grants

Important Dates

  • January 4, 2012: Deadline for submitting open panels
  • January 18, 2012: Abstract submissions open:
  • March 18, 2012: Deadline for submissions of individual papers and session proposals.
  • May 15, 2012: Acceptance notification.

CALL FOR PAPERS: “Design and displacement – social studies of science and technology”

Deadline for abstract submission: March 18, 2012

The quadrennial joint conference of The Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) and European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) will take place October 17-20, 2012 in Copenhagen, Denmark. For the conference we invite papers that address the dynamics and interrelationships between science, technology and society. Papers which address the conference’s theme ‘Design and Displacement’ are especially relevant, but papers on any topic in STS are welcome.

‘Design’ has become a key concept across a multitude of disciplinary domains and social spheres. In addition to its traditional ‘aesthetic’ associations, it is now a key term in multiple scientific domains and in diverse technological practices. One can even think of societies and social arrangements being ‘designed’. In science and technology, ‘design’ implies the re-arrangement of materials and ideas for innovative purposes. When newly designed scientific and technical objects enter the world, however, their initial purposes are often displaced.

For decades, STS researchers have been following the practical and political dimensions of science and technology. By focusing on concepts and practices of scientific and technological design at their sites of construction and on their multiple displacements, the 2012 conference continues this tradition. By bringing together ‘design’ and ‘displacement’ we want to highlight how scientific and technological design engages with existing socio-technical arrangements in both planned and unplanned ways, facilitating both collaborations and contestations, and generating both order and disorder.

The conference encourages analytic, critical, and practical engagement with design and displacement in several ways. First, it points to the need for investigating the relation between design intentions and their displacements, for example as catalysts for change and conflict. It also highlights the importance of investigating design controversies. It locates design practices in broader political contexts, and focuses attention on how design facilitates or hinders social inclusion, locally and globally. The theme ‘Design and Displacement’ invites careful analyses of the way design practices take part in shaping worlds. However, ‘Design and Displacement’ also raises questions around STS as design work and practice-based interventions. In this sense design becomes simultaneously topic and outcome, a situation that raises new questions concerning the role of STS research.

Program Practices

Each participant in the conference will be limited to only one paper presentation and one other activity (such as session chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances.

Papers may be submitted individually or by a session organizer. Paper abstracts should be up to 250 words. They should include the main arguments, methodology, and their contribution to the STS literature. The title of papers should be up to 10 words.

New this year, individual papers may be submitted to one or more “Open Panels”. The call for open panel themes received enthusiastic response from the community. 106 panels are available, which have been grouped into 10 subject clusters. View the full descriptions at http://www.4sonline.org/files/open_panels_12.pdf.

Session proposals should be limited to 250 words total, and should contain a theme and a rationale for the session, and a brief discussion of its contribution to the STS community. Session proposals should list a chairperson and names of all session organizers and panelists, including institutional affiliations and (electronic) addresses. Session proposals should be based on the assumption of 1½-hour time slots with fifteen minutes per presentation. A typical session consists of maximum five papers, one chairperson, and a fifteen-minute open discussion slot. You must have a minimum of three complete paper descriptions in order to submit a session proposal. You can add additional papers to the session up until the submission deadline.

Contact Info

The meeting “home page” is at http://www.4sonline.org/meeting. For information on EASST, visit http://www.easst.net/.

For general meeting information and any questions about the program, contact the Scientific Program Chair, Signe Vikkelsø at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

For technical assistance with the submission or registration process, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

For information on Copenhagen Business School, see www.cbs.dk/en

2011 Annual Meeting

November 2-5, 2011
Cleveland City Center Hotel (formerly Crowne Plaza Hotel)

View photos from the 4S Meeting in Cleveland.

Co-located with the History of Science Society and the Society for the History of Technology.

Conference Highlights

The conference will begin on Wednesday evening with the Opening Plenary (Speakers: Geoffrey Bowker, Lawrence Busch, Adele Clarke and Ellen Balka) dedicated to the Intellectual Legacy of the Susan Leigh Star (former 4S President, 2006−2007), followed by a reception. All 4S participants are encouraged to attend, to mingle and to converse.

Thursday evening will include a joint 4S, HSS, SHOT plenary (Speakers: Spencer Weart, Gabrielle Hecht and Hugh Gusterson) on Dealing with Disasters. It will be followed by a joint reception at the Great Lakes Science Center. Enjoy this exciting venue along with hearty appetizers and a cash bar for only $10. Bus transportation will be provided.

Friday evening will include the 4S Presidential Plenary (Speakers: Evelyn Fox Keller and Steven Shapin), followed by a reception and the Annual Awards Banquet. Come Dressed as Your Favorite R&R Star!

Paper sessions will officially begin on Thursday morning and end on Saturday evening.

Program

Download the official print program (4MB PDF) or the program with abstracts. (2 MB)

Search the online program here. Click through to an individual session and you can add it to your personal schedule. (You must log in first to save your schedule.)

NOTE TO PRESENTERS: 4S provides *only* a screen and projector in each room. Rooms are not equipped with laptops (which must be provided by the presenters or, more typically, by collective agreement--one laptop for the whole session).

Conference Location & Lodging

Cleveland City Center Hotel (formerly Crowne Plaza Hotel)
777 St. Clair Avenue NE, Cleveland, OH 44114
Hotel Front Desk: 1-216-771-7600 | Hotel Fax: 1-216-566-0736

To register for a room, call Toll Free: 1-877-2CROWNE (1-877- 227-6963) or 1-877-208-2519. You must mention that you are with the Society for Social Studies of Science in order to receive the discounted room rate of $130 per night. Alternatively, you may register online entering group code "SSS".

The hotel is located in downtown Cleveland, adjacent to the Convention Center and overlooking Lake Erie. Meeting hotels for History of Science Society and the Society for the History of Technology are close by. It is within blocks of numerous attractions including the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame; Great Lakes Science Center; Cleveland Metroparks Zoo; Time Warner Cable Amphitheater at Tower City; Cleveland Browns Stadium; Progressive Field; and Q-Quicken Loans Arena

Travel to Cleveland

By Air

  • You can fly to the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE), Cleveland’s main airport. Air Fare Discount on Continental: Save 2-10% on Continental Airlines travel to Cleveland in November. Save an additional 3% discount for booking at http://www.continental.com. Enter code ZK9Y803338. (May need to be broken down for travel agents as such: Agreement Code: 803338 Z Code: ZK9Y)
  • Crowne Plaza Hotel is approx. 12 miles from the CLE airport. You can take a taxi which will take approx. 20 minutes. Or you can call Independent Shuttle Service at 1-216-3248999 to book the shuttle for approx. $14 one way per person. Or you can take the Cleveland Regional Transit Authority’s (RTA) train which will cost approx. $2.25. The RTA Red Line runs from inside the airport to the heart of downtown in roughly 30 minutes. Get off at Tower City-Public Square. Head northeast toward Ontario Street (approx. 240 ft). Turn left at Ontario Street (approx. 450 ft). Turn right at St. Clair Avenue (approx. 0.2 mi).

By Train

  • You can take Amtrak train to the Cleveland Lakefront Station at 200 Memorial Shoreway, Cleveland, OH 44114. 
  • For reservations, call 1-800-8727245 or visit http://www.amtrak.com
  • Crowne Plaza Hotel is approx. 0.5 miles from the Amtrak train station.
  • You can take a taxi or walk to Crowne Plaza Hotel. Head northeast on Erieside Avenue (approx. 0.2 mi). Turn right at East 9th Street (approx. 0.4 mi). Turn right at St. Clair Avenue (approx. 250 ft).

By Bus

  • You can take Greyhound Bus to Cleveland Greyhound Station at 1465 Chester Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44114. Telephone: 1-216-7812464.
  • For reservations, call 1-800-2312222 or visit www.greyhound.com
  • Crowne Plaza Hotel is approx. 0.5 miles from the Greyhound bus station. You can take a taxi or walk to Crowne Plaza Hotel. Head west on Chester Avenue (approx. 360 ft). Turn right at East 13th Street (approx. 0.2 mi). Turn left at St. Clair Avenue (approx. 0.3 mi).

By Car

  • Customize direction using the MapQuest / Google map / Yahoo map.
  • If driving from South: Take I-71 North to East 9th Street exit. Go north on East 9th Street. Turn left onto St. Clair Avenue. The hotel is on the right.
  • If driving from North: Take I-71 South to East 9th Street exit. Go south on East 9th Street. Turn right onto St. Clair Avenue. The hotel is on the right.
  • If driving from East: Take I-90 West to state RT 2 West. Exit onto East 9th Street. Go south on East 9th Street. Turn right onto St. Clair Avenue. The hotel is on the right.
  • If driving from West: Take I-90 East to the East 9th Street exit. Go north on East 9th Street. Turn left onto St. Clair Avenue. The hotel is on the right.
  • Parking at Crowne Plaza Hotel: Daily parking 0-4 hours $6.00; Daily parking 4-8 hours $1.00; Daily parking 8-24 hours $18.00; Valet Parking $20.00

Visiting Cleveland

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is the ultimate place to explore the spirit of rock and roll and how it continues to shape our lives. Show your 4S conference badge for a $5 discount. Exhibits take you through the evolution and history of rock and roll music, from one-hit wonders to legendary Inductees, from the roots of rock to the music scenes in cities like Memphis, New York, Detroit, San Francisco, Seattle, Los Angeles and London. Exhibits explore the impact of the iconic rock stars, as well as the Inductees of tomorrow. 2011 Special Exhibit: Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power. Saturday, 5 November there will be a Tribute Concert for Aretha Franklin at the State Theater – she will be present to receive an award but is not apparently performing.

We are in Cleveland during Restaurant Week. Your meeting program has a comprehensive restaurant guide. Download this walking tour guide of downtown Cleveland.

The Society for the History of Technology has kindly made a number of tours available for 4S members. This year's tours include the ArcelorMittal Steel Mill, a bus tour of industrial Cleveland, a tour of Cleveland bridges, the Great Lakes Brewing Company, an architectural tour of downtown Cleveland, and a visit to the Dittrick Medical Museum. To sign up for a SHOT tour, please visit http://www.historyoftechnology.org/cleveland/cleveland_tours.html. To participate in these tours, you do NOT need to register with SHOT. Once you have selected which tour you wish to take, please fill out a SHOT registration form, pay the tour fee, and mail or fax it back to us. Our fax number is 434.975.2190. For more information, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Meeting Registration

Registration is now open on the 4S Members Site. Register early and save. Non-members may join 4S while registering and save money. Members can renew while registering and avoid a separate transaction later.

Below are the registration fees. Early registration fees expire on August 1. On November 2, the late fee goes into effect and registration is on-site only.

Students and non-OECD Professional
Member Early  70 120
  Regular  100 180
  Late  130 240
Non-member Early  110 190
  Regular  140 250
  Late  170 310

Exhibitors

The 4S is the oldest and largest scholarly association devoted to studying science, technology and society. The annual meeting attracts over 1,000 scholars. Many attendees look forward to the book exhibit for finding new books for class, for their research, and for staying current in the field. Visit the Exhibitors page for information on how to participate. http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/exhibitors

Mentorship Program

The Mentorship Program has become a popular part of the 4S conference. The goal of the program is to facilitate mentoring of individuals who are new to the conference and/or to 4S. A mentoring relationship assumes a minimum of one conversation at the 4S conference. It is hoped that mentoring relationships will also continue with at least two follow-up phone calls or emails during the following 12 months. We will match new scholars with more experienced scholars and make an effort to assign mentors outside of one's university. We hope that the mentoring project will allow new scholars to feel more at home in the STS community.

Visit the Mentorship Program registration page for more information and to sign up: http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/mentorship_program

Travel Support for Students

Please consult the travel grants page for more information.
http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/travel_grants

Contact Info

For general meeting information and any questions about the program, contact the 4S Program Chair, Roli Varma, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque [Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)] | Telephone: 1-505-277-7756].

For technical assistance with the submission or registration process, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Important Dates

  • March 15, 2011: Deadline for submissions of individual papers and session proposals.
  • May 15, 2011: Acceptance notification.
  • May 15 – July 31, 2011: Early registration.
  • June 30, 2011: Preliminary program posted.
  • September 15, 2011: Last day to book a room at the Crowne Plaza Hotel Cleveland City Centre to get the reduced rate. We recommend early booking since room availability is based on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • September 15, 2011: All presenters must register to be included in the final program. For papers with more than one author, one presenter must register to be included in the final program.
  • October 1, 2011: Final program posted.

* * * * * * * * *

Call for Papers

April 1, 2011: Deadline for Submissions of Individual Papers and Session Proposals

The 2011 4S conference will be held in Cleveland, Ohio. There is no predetermined theme for the 4S conference. Individual paper abstracts and proposals for sessions should emphasize how they will make original and timely contributions to any theme relevant to science and technology studies (STS). The 4S conference welcomes papers, session proposals, and events that are innovative in their delivery, organization, range of topics, type of public, and which bring new resources to the STS community to explore these new relations and themes. Apart from traditional research papers, the 4S conference also welcomes proposals for sessions and papers using ‘new media’ or other forms of new presentation.

Given the growing size of the 4S conferences and the desire to be as inclusive as possible, the program chair will need to make full use of the available time slots. Therefore, individuals may be listed for a paper presentation and one other role (such as session chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances.

Paper abstracts should be up to 250 words. They should include the main arguments, methodology, and their contribution to the STS literature. The title of papers should be up to 10 words. Please list five key words to assist the program chair to group individual papers into a session. In addition, identify the most suitable categories for the paper (e.g. environment, information communication technologies, gender studies, science policy, etc.).

Session proposals should be up to 250 words. They should contain a summary and rationale for the session, as well as a brief discussion of its contribution to STS. Session proposals should be organized around one-and-half-hour time slots. A typical session will contain five papers or four papers with a discussant. A minimum of three complete paper abstracts are required in order to submit a session proposal. The program chair may assign additional papers to proposed sessions with three papers. Each paper abstract in the proposed session should be up to 250 words. The title of papers should be up to 10 words.

Since 2008, the 4S has run a ‘workshop’ format. This is an opportunity for informal presentations, with presenters and other attendees seated around tables. Session organizers should indicate if they would like to be part of a workshop table. Submissions for ‘workshop’ presentations are included under the one first-authored submission limit, stated earlier.

Submission Process

Submissions are now closed. Paper and session proposals are accepted through an online system. This is a separate database from the 4S membership/registration system. All presenters, including those included in session proposals, must have a user account with this system that includes name, affiliation, and contact information. Submitters can create user accounts on behalf of their co-authors and session presenters, if necessary. Anyone who has participated in a 4S meeting in the last three years should already have a user account.

Calls for Session Participants

4S supports session organizers seeking participants. However, it is not practical to run all such calls in Technoscience. 4S has created a special web page for calls for session participants. Here you can submit a call and browse for suitable sessions for your paper.

Mentorship Program

2010 Annual Meeting

Held jointly with Japanese Society for Science and Technology Studies

August 25 – 29, 2010

Venue: Komaba I Campus, University of Tokyo
3-8-1, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo, 153-8902
Access map / Campus map / Meeting locations

View the photo gallery from the Tokyo meeting.

"STS in Global Contexts"

Abstract submission has closed.

The 2010 4S conference will be held with JSSTS (Japanese Society for Science and Technology Studies). This is the first 4S annual meeting in Asia. 4S members will have a chance to experience, interact with, and understand the cultural diversity of Asia. Furthermore, holding 4S in Asia opens the door to questions relating to universalities and cultural differences in STS concepts. This meeting will provide a good opportunity for reconsidering STS in global contexts as well as strengthening STS network worldwide.

Download the list of participants (July 29).

Schedule of activities

25th (Wed)  Registration, 4S Council Meeting, 4S Prize Committee, Welcome Reception
26th (Thu)  2 Sessions (a.m.) 3 Sessions (p.m.)
27th (Fri)   2 Sessions (a.m.) 1 Session (p.m.), Presidental Plenary,  Reception (sponsored by Microsoft Research), 4S Banquet, Karaoke party
28th (Sat)   2 Sessions (a.m.) 3 Sessions (p.m.), JSSTS Banquet
29th (Sun)  Japanese Sessions, JSSTS Council Meeting (Only Japanese sessions on Sunday)

Download a session schedule grid.

Program

Download the full program with abstracts (4MB PDF).

Find an interactive program on the abstract submission site. You can search or browse all authors, presentations, and sessions. You can also view sessions on a calendar grid. Log in and you can construct a personalized schedule.

Get to Know Tokyo

One Noodle at a Time in Tokyo
By Matt Gross (New York Times)
Ramen, a simple concoction of broth and noodles, has inspired passion among Japanese and foreigners alike, and allows for a deeper understanding of the city itself.

Tokyo Tourism Info

Japan National Tourism Organization

Lonely Planet

Frommer's on Japan

Tokyo Convention and Visitors' Bureau

Tokyo Colour Movie

Registration

Registration is now open.

Early member rates, in effect until June 1, are $200 for professionals and $100 for students. 4S and JSSTS members can log in and will be offered the member discount.

Not a member? Add a membership to your shopping cart and the discount will be calculated at Check Out.

Registration rates in US Dollars:

Student Professional
Member Early  100 200
  Regular  150 300
  Late  200 400
Non-member Early  150 275
  Regular  200 375
  Late  250 450

Contact info

For information about the program or Tokyo logistics, contact the , Minako Kusafuka.

If you have any questions or problems about registration, please contact: (Asia) or (US, et al).

Mentorship Program

The Mentorship Program has become a popular part of the Annual Meeting. The goal of the project is to facilitate mentoring of individuals who are new to the conference and/or to the Society. A mentoring relationship assumes a minimum of one conversation at the Annual Meeting. We hope that mentoring relationships will also continue with at least two follow-up phone calls or emails during the following 12 months. Scholars willing to be mentors or who desire a mentor can fill out the interest form at the Mentorship Program Registration page.

Karaoke Party after the 4S Banquet

The Friday evening banquet ends promptly at 20:30. Join fellow 4S pop stars for authentic Japanese karaoke afterwards at Anthem’s Secret Lounge in Shibuya. 20:45~23:30. Directions here.

Students

See the Travel Grant info page and 6S Activities at the Tokyo Meeting.

Related Events

Science in Society: A Challenge in Japan

Visa Information

We regret that the deadline for processing visa requests has passed.

Past Meetings

Co-sponsored meeting

At the World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis:  Past Present & Future of Research

4S History

Programs from first two meetings!

First meeting, November 1976,
Cornell University
(700k .doc)

Second Meeting, October 1977,
Harvard University
(1200k .doc)

2016 - Barcelona

2015 - Denver

2014 - Buenos Aires

2013 - San Diego

2012 - Copenhagen

2011 - Cleveland

2010 - Tokyo

2009 - Washington, DC

2008 - Rotterdam, The Netherlands

2007 - Montreal, QC

2006 - Vancouver, BC

2005 - Pasadena, California

2004 - Paris, France

2003 - Atlanta, Georgia--Program (1.2 MB PDF)

2002 - Milwaukee, Wisconsin

2001 - Cambridge, Massachusetts

2000 - Vienna, Austria

1999 - San Diego, California

1998 - Halifax, Nova Scotia

1997 - Tucson, Arizona

1996 - Bielefeld, Germany

1995 - Charlottesville, Virginia

1994 - New Orleans, Louisiana

1993 - West Lafayette, Indiana (1.4mb PDF)

1992 - Gothenburg, Sweden

1991 - Cambridge, Massachusetts

1990 - Minneapolis, Minnesota

1989 - Irvine, California

1988 - Amsterdam, Netherlands

1987 - Worcester, Massachusetts

1986 - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

1985 - Troy, New York

1984 - Ghent, Belgium

1983 - Blacksburg, Virginia (485kb PDF)

1982 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1981 - Atlanta, Georgia

1980 - Toronto, Ontario, Canada

1979 - Washington, D.C.

1978 - Bloomington, Indiana

1977 - Boston, Massachusetts

1976 - Ithaca, New York

 

2004 Annual Meeting

The post-conference website is now on line: http://www.csi.ensmp.fr/csi/4S/index.php

You will find there:

  • some statistics
  • paper abstracts and about 130 full papers: don't hesitate to send Frederic Vergnaud   your paper if you wish it to be put on line.
  • pictures taken mostly by Catherine Lucas...

You can also download:

  • the list of attendees
  • the book of abstracts

 

Archived page follows:

25-28 August, 2004, Ecole des Mines

Make plans now! It is not too soon to submit a session, a paper, or an illustrated paper. You can also register for the conference and make your hotel reservation.

Sponsored by Intel

Key dates to remember:

February 15 th Deadline for session submission
March 15 th Deadline for paper or illustrated paper submissions
April 15 th End of selection process by the program committee
May 1 st End of early registration fee rate
May 15 th End of registration for participants submitting a paper or a session. We will assume that failure to do so means you have withdrawn your paper or your session submission. In case your submission would be rejected by the scientific committee and if you don't want to attend the meeting, your registration fees will be reimbursed. If you have any problem with paying by the date indicated please let us know and we will agree on a solution.
August 25 th to 28 th 4S/EASST Conference

 

For scientific information, you must contact Madeleine Akrich or Christelle Gramaglia.

For information on the website, registration, and reservation, please contact Chantal Iannarelli.

Best wishes.

4S-EASST program committee:


Madeleine Akrich and Christelle Gramaglia
Centre de Sociologie de l'Innovation
Ecole des Mines de Paris
60 bd Saint Michel, 75006 Paris, France

2005 Annual Meeting

 

October 20-22, 2005

Hilton Pasadena

Pasadena, California

 

THE REPRESENTATION OF CONTROVERSIAL OBJECTS: NEW METHODS OF DISPLAYING THE UNRULY AND THE ANOMALOUS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY STUDIES

The program committee invites contributions that explore unruly objects in science and technology -- including controversial, invisible, secret, or anomalous things. We are especially interested in showcasing new forms of representation and display, and welcome experimentation with theory, method, and conferencing modes.

For more detailed information, contact the Program Chair:

Marianne De Laet

Download program. (281kb PDF)

2006 Annual Meeting

November 1-5, 2006

The Empire Landmark

Vancouver, B.C, Canada

The 2006 4S conference will celebrate the 30th anniversary of the society. The meeting will be co-located with the History of Science Society and Philosophy of Science Association, which will be in a hotel a few blocks away. We will be exploring some new session formats this year, including new media presentations, “fire-side chats”, and junior-senior sessions. If you have ideas for these or other formats, please contact the Program Chair: Wenda Bauchspies.

Program

Updated Oct. 27. Download the full conference program, with abstracts (2.6mb PDF) or without (960kb PDF).

The program will begin Wednesday evening with two events. First will be the Fireside Chat: "1976 and all that…", followed by a Mingling Event for juniors, seniors and anyone involved in the mentor program. All scholars are encouraged to attend, to mingle and to converse.

The sessions will officially begin on Thursday at 8:30 am and end Sunday at noon. Thursday evening there will be a joint reception with HSS and PSA. Friday night will be the annual awards banquet. Saturday night will be the President's Plenary followed by a reception.

The joint reception between HSS/PSA and 4S will take place at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, which is 6 blocks or approximately 1 km from the Landmark Empire Hotel. If you need transportation to the reception, please inform the program chair. Taxis are readily available outside both hotels and the fare is approximately $5 to go between hotels.

The program committee would like to encourage you to buy the daily box lunches because there will be several lunchtime roundtable sessions on topics such as Nanotechnology, Engineering Education, STS Engaged, Interdisciplinarity, to STS in Canada. In addition the four "author meets critic" sessions will also occur over lunch. If you or some group is planning a lunchtime meeting for the 4S Conference in Vancouver, please email the chair to let her know that it may be placed on the program.

Location and Accommodations

The Empire Landmark, 1400 Robson St., Vancouver, B.C. V6G 1B9 Canada Tel: (604) 687-0511; Fax: (604) 687-7267 is holding a block of rooms for participants at $92.00 CAD single or double occupancy plus tax. Reservations must be made by October 1, 2006 to guarantee this rate. After this date reservations will be accepted on a space available basis only. Be sure to mention that you are attending the 4S conference.

To find a roommate, consider using the 4S discussion board.

The Student Section (6S) is arranging affordable alternative accommodations.

Download a VancouverDining Guide. (.doc)

Transport from the Airport to Empire Landmark Hotel

There is an airport shuttle bus called: Airporter that stops at Empire Landmark Hotel.
The price is $13.00 Canadian and round trip $20. The last bus leaves the airport at 20:48 and you pay the bus driver. There are taxi's for $30.00 one way.

Childcare Options

Childcare in Vancouver is in high demand, and can be costly. Drop-in childcare options are rare, and you should make advance plans if you hope to arrange childcare for infants or older children. The following groups may assist in planning childcare:

The YMCA advises that all of their Under 5 programs are currently full and do not offer Drop-In child care. Their School-Age programs do offer Drop-In care, but the hours are for only before school and after school hours. The Resource and Referral Office at 604-709-5661 may be able to assist you in finding an appropriate, licensed child care.

Nannies on Call offer individual or small group nannying in a home or hotel room (the nanny:child ratio depends on childrens ages). They can also take bookings for a larger group of children during an event. Their basic rate starts at $16CAN/hour, and a minimum booking of 3 hours is required. All nannies are fully qualified and bonded. They may not drive children or administer medications. For bookings and information, call 604-734-1776, 1-877-214-2828

Just like Mum! A provider of temporary childcare since 1992. Specializing in Group/Convention activities where children/teens will explore Vancouver's "Kid" friendly venues! Private care also available. .

In addition, the Best Western downtown has a babysitting service and is near the Empire Hotel and the Hyatt.

 

Exhibitors and Sponsors

Book exhibits have always been a major feature at the annual conference. Sponsors are always welcome and receive special considerations in return for their sponsorship. Those organizations wishing to exhibit or sponsor an event at the conference are encouraged to contact the >conference administrator.

 

Mentoring Program

The 4S Council has endorsed an iniative by the 4S Student Section (6S) to begin a mentoring program in 2006. When registering for the annual meeting, 4S members will have the option to sign up to participate as a mentor, mentee, or both. We will match participants in advance of the meeting, and facilitate introductions. This program is targeted to help young scholars, graduate students, and first-time meeting attendees. Expectations will include having 2-3 conversations during the year. This will be a pilot program for 2006, with the possibility of extension. If you have questions, ideas, or want to volunteer to help implement the mentoring program, please contact Jason Delborne, 4S student representative. Let us know your interest in participating as either a mentor or mentee.

Call for Papers: Silence, Suffering and Survival

Deadline for Submissions was April 3, 2006

This year's theme is "Silence, Suffering and Survival", and it is designed to explore the overlooked spaces, boundaries, actors, networks, and artifacts of science and technology. We welcome papers and panels that address questions about the silences of silencing, unintended consequences, and persistence in science, technology and STS. The topic is meant to open up and stir discussion about theorizing in areas we may have overlooked such as the process of secrecy under which processes of silence are often conducted. Possible topics might include the science and technology of slavery, disability, survival, warfare, peace, and quantification. Discussions might address de-moralization and re-moralization within science, technology and STS, the sort of silence/noise created by technology/science, and how technology/science create and alleviate suffering and/or survival. This could include processes of survival that are often off the record, such as workarounds, “older ways of knowing”, older (non-scientific) ways of knowing, and …?

New Session Formats

Some sessions at the Vancouver 4S will be designated "working sessions" for which papers will be available online in advance, and allotted time will be primarily for discussion. If you would like to organize a working session please contact Josh Greenberg, Tarleton Gillespie, or Sergio Sismondo

Some sessions at the Vancouver 4S will be designated "new media". If you would like to organize a session or participate in one please contact Linda Layne.

Contact

For more information, contact the Program Chair: Wenda K. Bauchspies.

2007 Annual Meeting

October 11-13, Montreal, Canada

Doubletree Plaza Hotel Montreal

 

Download Program (456 kb PDF)

Download Abstracts (1.4 mb PDF)

 

Call for Papers

Ways of Knowing

The February 1 deadline for submitting papers and sessions has passed. Authors and organizers will receive notification about the status of their submissions shortly.

The theme for the conference is ways of knowing. By this we mean several things: implicitly, that there are many ways of knowing any particular object, process, or event; that some of these ways of knowing have historically been more valued than others; and that processes of adjudicating ways of knowing have usually been neither nice nor neutral. So we are interested in processes of valuation (from the language of debates to acts of censorship) that result in one way of knowing as “the right one” or “the natural one.” We are interested in how people, groups, or cultures hold more than one way of knowing, and whether this is stable, durable, or problematic. When different ways of knowing are triangulated, how is this actually done in practice? What is lost and what is gained in the triangulation process?

We are interested in how certain ways of knowing are deemed to be “non-scientific,” (for example, magic, divination, astrology, etc). Several other interesting areas spring from this mixture of questions: historically, what is kept, or what is ignored, in studies of knowledges and paradigm shifts? (Including here questions of collective memory and collective forgetting.) How do new regimes of record keeping, such as the electronic patient record or the full text data base, affect what is remembered and what is forgotten? (This may be true across a large numbers of fields.) All sorts of questions about translation arise in discussing these issues – Who chooses what is to be translated? Who does the translation? Does the quality of the translation impact the nature of knowledge, and if so, how? In Howard Becker's famous concept, "hierarchy of credibility," he claims that, for a well-socialized member of a hierarchical organization or institution, information coming from "the top" is de facto more credible than that coming from "the bottom." So, a bank president, regardless of what she says, is more credible than a temporary janitor. However, within science studies, and following many sorts of principles of symmetry, we do not take members' hierarchies for granted, especially as questions of voice and position are precisely the matters under analysis.

Given that our conference will be in Quebec, one of the sites where language (as a marker) of difference was bitterly disputed, we must examine the idea that language carries powerful politics. In some cases, as with Aboriginal children, the attempt to suppress a language is linked with the destruction of culture and even with genocide. Finally, there are different ways of knowing that are formed by gestures, by ways of pronouncing words, or by how names are heard and understood. Sometimes ways of knowing are different with respect to quantitative vs. qualitative; visual vs. textual, or statistical vs. enumerative. These only suggest the ways knowledges may frame findings, thus mirroring a final finding.

A final word about themes: these are posed in order to help frame related research. As always, themes are meant to suggest and encourage, not provide an iron cage. So, the Program Committee welcomes work that is outside the sketches drawn here; submissions are welcome from any of the variety of areas normally addressed by 4S (or even those not normally addressed, but which need to be).

Program Practices

Given the growing size of the 4S conferences and the desire to be as inclusive as possible, the program committee will need to make full use of the available time slots. Therefore, individuals may be listed for a paper presentation and one other activity (such as session chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances.

Session proposals should be based on the assumption of two-hour time slots with fifteen minutes per presentation. A typical session may have six papers, one discussant, and a fifteen-minute open discussion slot. Proposals for double and triple sessions on a single topic may receive a request to consolidate the topic into one panel or to break the multiple sessions into different topics. The program committee may need to assign additional papers to sessions in order to accommodate the number of submissions and reduce the rejection rate.

Panels generally consist of research presentations, but alternative formats are available:

  • “Working Sessions” Participants in Working Sessions will post their papers or presentations prior to the meeting, allowing for more discussion during the sessions. If you have more questions about working sessions, please contact Sergio Sismondo.
  • “New Media” sessions involve screening of video and other media.
  • Poster sessions will be an open event on Thursday evening.
  • A limited number of roundtable proposals may be accepted for the lunch-time slot. Generally, roundtables are on institutional topics such as mentoring and career development.

The program chair is David Hess. Please address all questions through the program chair assistant, Anne Borrero.

2008 Annual Meeting

August 20-23, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Held jointly with European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST)

View the slide show. Below you will find the draft program and information about registration, lodging, and several social programs. These include the conference banquet on Friday night, an excursion to the Dutch waterworks, and the welcome reception in the Rotterdam town hall. As a special service we are offering the possibility to register for child care. The conference venue is at the Woudestein campus of the Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Location

The conference venue is at the Woudestein campus of the Erasmus University Rotterdam. The conference is located in the T and M buildings on campus. On-site registration is in the M-building and opens on Wednesday 20 August at 14:00 hrs.

General information about the University

Woudestein campus map

Travel information to the campus

Program

The final program for the conference is now available. (This is a 677KB PDF file. You will need the Adobe Reader to open it.) You can also download the book of abstracts (2.8 MB pdf).

Special Events

A welcome reception will be organized at the Rotterdam Town Hall (located at the Coolsingel 40) on Wednesday 20 August from 18:30 to 19:30. Participation in the welcome reception is free, but please note that participation is limited and will be provided on a first-come-first go basis.

The Friday evening banquet will be held in one of the most exciting locations in town, the former Cruise Terminal of the Holland America Line (note that the site is Dutch only). This Terminal has since 1873 been the point of departure for some 850,000 immigrants from Europe on their way to New Amsterdam (these days better known to some as New York). The Cruise Terminal is located in the old harbor that is now completely renovated, overlooking the Erasmus (‘swan’) bridge. See the Port of Rotterdam website for more information on the area.

There is also the possibility to join a guided tour to the Dutch waterworks. (CLOSED) The guide is Wiebe Bijker himself, who has published extensively on these waterworks. Transport from the conference location will be provided. Participation is limited to 60 people.

(Please note, these event options are labeled "sessions" in our registration system.)

Blog

Can't come to the meeting? Follow along courtesy of volunteer bloggers.

Extra-curriculars

Here are some things going on in Rotterdam for when you are not giving a talk or listening to papers.

At the Lloyd Multiplein there is the 'open air movie theatre' playing films from about 21.30 (or when it is dark enough). The program looks promising (see http://www.pleinbioscoop.nl/ for details -- the site is in dutch but just click on 'programma' in the upper menu) and is for free. You can bring your own drinks (but glass is not allowed) and you can get a chair at the site (or hire, the site is not explicit here; last year it was 1 euro for a chair). The Lloyd Multiplein is at the Westzeedijk -- take tram 8 and get out at Oostkousdijk or metro Calandlijn, Coolhaven station, with a 10 minute walk.

On 22-23 August there is the 'formula zero' race with cars using fuel cell powered cars. The race is at the Willemsplein (underneath the 'Swan' or Erasmus bridge). For more information, see http://www.formulazero.nl/.

In the Boymans van Beuningen museum, there is an exhibition on 100 years of Dutch design. From 23 August, there is an exhibition of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama.

At the site of the Rotterdam 'uitburo' you can find a host of other activities going on in the city.
The site is unfortunately Dutch only, which will however give you an extra occasion to talk to any of the Dutch participants at the conference.

Registration

Early registration has now closed! Register now if you haven't done so to avoid the high onsite registration fee. Register online using Mastercard or Visa. You will be prompted to log in (if you are a member of EASST and/or 4S) or to create a profile for the web site (if you are not). There are attractively priced packages that includemembership and registration.

As registration is in US dollars but our expenses are in Euros, changing exchange rates can lead to changes in the amounts of dollars that you are charged for registration. Please make sure to register as soon as possible. The current registration fee schedule is below. These are member rates.

 
Early
After June 17
On site
Professionals €185 €265 €330
Students €110 €160 €195

Lodging

Rotterdam has lots of hotel and hostel accommodations. The Rotterdam conference bureau has provided a overview of reservation policies and a list of hotels and other accommodation. For the hotels on this list we have reserved many rooms for participants to the conference to ensure all will be accommodated; for some of the hotels we have also been able to arrange discounts. In order to make use of these discounts, please make reservations through this website, which will be handled by the local conference bureau.

Travel $ for students

The deadline for travel grant applications is now closed.

Exhibitors

Note for publishers: if you want to exhibit books at the conference, please contact Marije Stofregen.

Mentorship Program

The 4S student section ("6S") is involved in ongoing efforts to mentor new faculty and students, and this will be the third year for our Mentor Program. The goal of the project is to facilitate mentoring of individuals who are new to the conference and/or to the Society. A mentoring relationship assumes a minimum of one conversation at the annual meeting in Rotterdam. We hope that mentoring relationships will also continue with at least two follow-up phone calls or emails during the following 12 months.

If you are interested in taking part in the mentor program, you must be registered for the conference.

We will match less experienced scholars with more experienced scholars and make an effort to assign mentors outside of one's university. We hope that the mentoring project will allow new scholars to feel more at home in the STS community.

Child care

Due to unsufficient interest, the organising committee has decided to cancel the childcare offering, as the cost per child would be unaccaptably high.

Call for Papers: Acting with science, technology and medicine

The four-yearly joint conference of The Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) and European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) will take place in Rotterdam, The Netherlands from 20th to 23rd August 2008. As with previous 4S/EASST conferences, the conference welcomes contributions on topics from the range of disciplines found within science, technology and innovation studies communities.

The theme for this conference is “Acting with science, technology and medicine”. This meeting responds to some remarkable and interesting changes in the concerns of STS research. STS-approaches are no longer only relevant for understanding the production of science, technology and innovation; they also are relevant for understanding the co-production of science and technology with policy, democracy, law, and the organization of health care, among other major institutional matters. Similarly STS researchers have become increasingly involved with practices of technology development, policymaking, legal decision-making and governance in different fields, such as science and technology policy, environmental regulation, and health care. The balance between observation and participation seems to have changed in these consequential practices of ‘acting with’. Such engagement is currently a major topic of discussion within the STS field. Several workshops, editorials and special issues have already been published or are under way. The ‘acting with’, or interventionist approach is likely to have consequences for research methodologies, for researchers’ obligations toward different publics, and for the kind of products STS-researchers deliver. In addition, like other aspects of science and technology, interventions by STS researchers are themselves subject to contingencies and negotiations that can lead to unanticipated consequences. This conference provides a forum to explore responses across the broad range of disciplinary perspectives found within science, technology and innovation studies. Papers are encouraged which explore diverse aspects of: the sponsors and audiences for STS research; the constitution of and relations with research objects and participants; the influences on methodological choices; and the construction of research products.

Program practices

Each participant in the conference will be limited to one first-authored submission and one other activity (such as session chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances.

Papers may be submitted individually or by a session organizer. Abstracts for papers should be 500 words or less, and must include both an outline of the paper, including a summary on methodology, and a brief statement on the contribution to the STS literature.

Session proposals should be limited to 500 words total, and should contain a summary and rationale for the session, and a brief discussion of its contribution to the STS community. Session proposals should list names of all session organizers and panelists, including institutional affiliations and (electronic) addresses. Session proposals should be based on the assumption of two-hour time slots with twenty minutes per presentation. A typical session may have five papers, one discussant, and a ten-minute open discussion slot. You must have a minimum of three complete paper descriptions in order to submit a session proposal.

Proposals for double and triple sessions on a single topic may receive a request to consolidate the topic into one panel or to break the multiple sessions into different topics. The program committee may need to assign additional papers to sessions in order to accommodate the number of submissions and reduce the rejection rate.

This Joint Meeting welcomes papers, sessions and events that are innovative in their delivery, organisation, range of topics, type of public and which bring new resources to the STS community to explore these new relations and themes. Of course, the theme is flexible, and is meant to accommodate a broad range of sessions and themes. Apart from traditional research papers, the conference will also welcome proposals for sessions and papers using ‘new media’ or other forms of innovative presentation.

For information on EASST, visit http://www.easst.net/.

For further inquiries, contact:
Roland Bal (chair program committee)
Dept. of Health Policy and Management
Erasmus University Medical Centre

2009 Annual Meeting

October 28 – 31, Washington, DC

View photos from the Washington meeting.

Program

Download large PDF version (8.5 x 11 inches, 2MB) of the full program. An interactive version is available on the program management site.

Registration

Registration is now open on the 4S members portal. Register early and save. Non-members, join 4S while registering and save money. Members, renew while registering and avoid a separate transaction later.

  Early After July 1 On-site
Professionals $150 $225 $300
Students $100 $150 $200

 

Location

Join us at the Hyatt Regency, Crystal City, in Arlington, Virginia, just across the river from Washington, DC, conveniently located on the Metro line and close to Reagan National Airport.

Travel to Washington

It is highly recommended that you fly into Washington/Reagan National Airport(DCA). This airport is near the city center and only 5 minutes from the hotel. There is also a free shuttle to and from the conference hotel. Please avoid flying into either Dulles Airport (IAD) or Baltimore/Washington Airport (BWI) as travel to the hotel can take hours and/or be costly. If you must fly into one of these airports, see ground transportation information for Dulles or Baltimore/Washington.

If you are arriving by train, you will arrive at Union Station in downtown DC. From there you will take the Red Line subway 2 stops to the gallery Place/Chinatown stop and change to the Yellow Line and go 5 stops to the Crystal City subway stop.

Arriving at the Crystal City Metro stop, you will come up on the escalator to street level and wait at the curb. The hotel has a van that circulates every 15-20 minutes to pick up hotel guests, including conference attendees. You can also walk from the subway stop to the hotel in about 20 minutes.

Maps

Google map of hotel vicinity

Google map of nearby restaurants

Washington Metro Rail

Lodging

The meeting will be held in its entirety at the Hyatt Regency, Crystal City, which is by far the most convenient hotel to the location. To get the special 4S hotel rate ($159, single or double occupancy), enter 'G-SSSS' (in the group/corporate # field) or call the central reservation line at 1-800-233-1234 and ask for the SSSS conference to get the special rate.

Travel $ for students

Please consult the travel grants page.

Exhibitors

The Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) is the oldest and largest scholarly association devoted to studying science, technology and society. The annual meeting attracts up to 1,000 scholars. Many attendees look forward to the the book exhibit for finding new books for class, for their research, and for staying current in the field. Visit the Exhibitors page for information on how to participate.

Mentorship Program

The 4S student section ("6S") is involved in ongoing efforts to mentor new faculty and students, and the Mentorship Program has become a popular part of the Annual Meeting. The goal of the project is to facilitate mentoring of individuals who are new to the conference and/or to the Society. A mentoring relationship assumes a minimum of one conversation at the annual meeting. We hope that mentoring relationships will also continue with at least two follow-up phone calls or emails during the following 12 months.

Registration for the mentorship program is now closed. For information, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

We will match less experienced scholars with more experienced scholars and make an effort to assign mentors outside of one's university. We hope that the mentoring project will allow new scholars to feel more at home in the STS community.

2010 in Tokyo!

Mark your calendars for the 2010 4S meeting, with Council for the Japanese Society of STS (JSSTS), 25-29 Aug in Tokyo Japan. Deadline for paper/session submission will be January 15, 2010.

Call for papers

Submissions are now closed. If you have already submitted a paper or session, you can log in to the abstract management system to edit your contact information, but you cannot edit or delete what you have already submitted. Please direct all correspondence to the Program Chairs at.

This year’s conference will not have a predetermined theme. Consequently, proposals for sessions and papers should emphasize how they will make innovative and timely contributions to any theme relevant to science and technology studies (STS). 

Guidelines

Given the growing size of the 4S conferences and the desire to be as inclusive as possible, the program committee will need to make full use of the available time slots. Therefore, individuals may be listed for a paper presentation and one other role (such as session chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances.

Paper abstracts may be submitted individually or by a session organizer. Submissions are in the form of abstracts of 500 words or less, and must include a summary of the paper’s main arguments and methodology, as well as a brief statement on the contribution to the STS literature.

Session proposals should be limited to 500 words total, and should contain a summary and rationale for the session, as well as a brief discussion of its contribution to STS. Session proposals should list names of all session organizers and panelists, including institutional affiliations and (electronic) addresses. Session proposals should be based on the assumption of two-hour time slots with twenty minutes per presentation. A typical session may have five papers, one discussant, and a ten-minute open discussion slot. You must have a minimum of three complete paper abstracts in order to submit a session proposal. The program committee may assign additional papers to proposed sessions.

Proposals for double and triple sessions on a single topic may receive a request to consolidate the topic into one panel or to break the multiple sessions into different topics.

The meeting welcomes papers, sessions and events that are innovative in their delivery, organization, range of topics, type of public and which bring new resources to the STS community to explore these new relations and themes. Apart from traditional research papers, the conference will also welcome proposals for sessions and papers using ‘new media’ or other forms of innovative presentation.

New session format

This year, for the first time, the 4S is including a new “workshop” format. This is an opportunity for informal presentations, with presenters and other attendees seated around tables. This format is ideal for a more interactive presentation of preliminary ideas and work in progress. Authors and session organizers should indicate if they would like to be part of a workshop table. Submissions for “workshop” presentations are included under the one first-authored submission limit, stated above. It is also possible for sessions to be proposed as workshop tables.

Contact info

For more information, contact the 4S program co-chairs, Barbara Allen and Daniel Breslau, at.

Future Meetings

2018 Sydney August 29-Sept 1

2019 New Orleans Sept 4-7

2020 European meeting

2021 Toronto Oct 6-9

Exhibitors and Sponsors

The Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) is the oldest and largest scholarly association devoted to studying science, technology and society with over 1200 members worldwide. Members of this organization include

  • scholars in anthropology, economics, education, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, psychology, and women’s studies
  • interdisciplinary scholars that work in feminist theory, cultural theory, postcolonial theory, public policy, innovation theory, and design.
  • scientists and engineers interested in the social aspects of their fields
  • members of the public with an interest in the way that science and technology affects their lives

The 4S Annual Meeting is a four-day event with over 16 concurrent sessions, receptions, and a book exhibit. The book exhibit showcases new releases and in print science and technology studies books. It provides editors, publishers and potential authors a chance to meet and discuss new book projects. Attendees depend on the book exhibit for finding new books for class, for their research and for staying current in the field.

Exhibit Space Pricing

Exhibitors have the choice of one 6 foot table ($150) or two 6 foot tables ($300) to display books from Thursday to Saturday.

Alternatively, publishers may send up to 8 books to be displayed on a shared table from Thursday to Saturday for a $75.00 fee. These books will become the property of 4S and will be sold in the silent auction on Saturday to support graduate student travel.

Purchase exhibit space through the online store. Note you can now generate an invoice during the checkout process.

Exhibit Hours

Thursday: 08:30 – 17:30
Friday: 08:30 – 17:30
Saturday: 09:00  – 15:00

Shipping and Drayage

Please refer to http://assets.sheratonbostonhotel.com/lps/assets/u/FedEx-Inbound-Shipping-Form.pdf

Advertising in the Meeting Program

For the Boston meeting we anticipate upwards of 1,600 attendees, each of whom will receive a pocket size program. 

A one-page ad is available for $200. Purchase ad space through the online store and send artwork to Wenda Bauchspies (see below). Deadline for receipt of ads is 1 July 2017.

Ads need to be 3 5/8” wide by 5” tall, (9.2 cm wide by 12.7 cm tall), 300 dpi, b/w or grayscale in any standard image format.

Sponsorship Opportunities

  • Wednesday night opening reception
  • Wednesday night hosted bar
  • Friday night (pre-banquet) reception
  • Saturday night reception
  • Coffee breaks

Contact

4S Exhibitor Coordinator
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Program Practices

The following notes are for Program organizers. They represent guidelines based on past practices of the Society and recommendations of the 4S Council that should be followed where possible.

Participation

Given the growing size of the 4S conferences and the desire to be as inclusive as possible, the program committee will need to make full use of the available time slots. Therefore, individuals may be listed for a paper presentation and one other role (such as session chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances.

Session organizers are requested not to change the order of the presenters in their session.

Proposals for double and triple sessions on a single topic may receive a request to consolidate the topic into one panel or to break the multiple sessions into different topics.

Participants are not allowed to have someone else (non co-authors) present their paper without paying ordinary registration fees at the 4S conference.

Session Format

4S provides *only* a screen and projector in each room. Rooms are not equipped with laptops. Instead, sessions organizers may be advised that presenters can provide their own or, more typically, go together and bring one laptop for the whole session.This is also true of other special equipment for presentations.

Requests for video conferencing, audio gear, and so forth may be made through the Special Needs box at the time of registration.  However, these requests will only be accommodated if the budget allows.

The meeting welcomes papers, sessions and events that are innovative in their delivery, organization, range of topics, type of public and which bring new resources to the STS community to explore these new relations and themes.

Since 2008, the 4S started a “workshop” format. This is an opportunity for informal presentations, with presenters and other attendees seated around tables. This format is ideal for a more interactive presentation of preliminary ideas and work in progress. Authors and session organizers should indicate if they would like to be part of a workshop table. Submissions for “workshop” presentations are included under the one first-authored submission limit, stated above. It is also possible for sessions to be proposed as workshop tables.

Business Meetings

Publications Committee meeting should be held from 1-3PM on Wednesday (the day preceding the meeting). The general council meeting should follow the Publications Committee meeting from 3-6PM. Simultaneous sessions should be kept at a minimum. The most desirable program arrangement is to maximize the number of time slots as follows: Thursday - 4 Friday - 4 Saturday - 4 Participation in Sunday sessions is very low, and these are not advisable.

 

Travel Grants

Overview

4S administers travel funds to support the participation of graduate students and other low-income scholars in its annual meetings. Three sources of funding are used for this purpose. The first two sources are exclusively available to support graduate student travel. They include the base funding, and a special fund created from proceeds from the 2010 meeting. This “Tokyo Fund” supports Asian, African, and Latin American graduate students who have a paper accepted to present at the 4S meetings. The third source of funding comes from the additional revenue generated from sustaining members and is used to support meeting participation by both students and other low-income scholars.

Awards are available for travel expenses only, not for food or lodging. The amount of each award will be determined once all applications have been received. In previous years, awards were in the range of $150-400, depending upon the distance to be traveled. However, the limited funds available do not allow us to award travel grants to all applicants.

The funding decision will be based on the following criteria:

  • Quality: Is the abstract of appropriate quality for presentation at 4S?
  • Conference participation beyond paper presentation: Are you organizing a panel or additional meeting, volunteering for additional work, etc.?
  • Relevance: If a graduate student, is the student enrolled in a graduate program? Is 4S the right place for this paper?
  • Completeness: Is the application complete?
  • Availability of alternative funds: Does your home institution provide travel funds, etc.?
  • Prior travel grants received: Did you receive 4S funding in the previous year?
  • Diversity: 4s is committed to inclusion and participation of under-represented groups and seeks each year to provide funding to these students.

Applications for 2017 support

Applications for 2017 are no longer being accepted. 

To qualify for a travel award, an applicant must be a graduate student or other low-income scholar presenting a paper at the 4S Annual Meeting and a member of 4S.

In cases of co-authorship, no more than one award will be granted for each paper presented.

Travel Restrictions

For graduate students receiving support from the base funding, because funds for these awards are provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation, 4S must comply with U.S. federal rules for reimbursable travel. The awardee is responsible for following the terms specified in NSF document 761, Travel to Foreign Countries. In particular, see Article 13, sections C and D of that document.  By submitting the application form the applicant agrees to abide by these terms. Reimbursement will not be provided unless these terms are followed.

Note that all air travel must occur on a U.S. carrier or in a U.S. airline designated seat on a foreign airline. Original receipts carrying the airline’s designator code and flight number must be provided (if you have an e-ticket, you must get a receipt at the time of check-in). Under certain circumstances, described in the NSF guidelines, travel on a foreign carrier may be allowed. Documentation of the unsuitability of U.S. carrier itineraries is required.

The mileage reimbursement rate for use of a privately owned vehicle is 56.5 cents per mile, per U.S. Internal Revenue Service guidelines. Receipts for gas must be provided!

For more information, please contact Prof. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). In the subject line, put "4S Travel Grant Application: [name]."

Reimbursement

Reimbursement requests will be accepted at this location following the meeting.

Using the link below, you can upload your receipts and submit all documents electronically. Record on the expense form your total travel costs even if the award amount does not cover all of your expenses. Your receipt must indicate the amount paid for the ticket, the flight numbers, the airline, and the dates of the flights. A boarding pass is not sufficient.

4S 2017 Boston

Heatmap of Boston’s most photographed locations, using geo-tagging and user data

Annual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S)

Boston, Massachusetts 

Wed. August 30 (11am!) – Sat. September 2, 2017 (5:30pm)

Conference theme: STS (In)Sensibilities

If sensibility is the ability to grasp and to respond, how might we articulate the (in)sensibilities of contemporary technoscience?  How, similarly, can we reflect on the extent and limits of our own sensibilities as STS scholars, teachers, and activists?  The conference theme invites an open reading and exploration of how the world is made differently sense-able through multiple discourses and practices of knowledge-making, as well as that which evades the sensoria of technoscience and STS.  Our aim is that the sense of ‘sense’ be read broadly, from mediating technologies of perception and apprehension to the discursive and material practices that render worlds familiar and strange, real and imagined, actual and possible, politically (in)sensitive and ethically sensible.     

We welcome open panel and closed session proposals, individual paper submissions, and proposals for events that are innovative in their delivery, organization, range of topics, and type of public.  Due to the growing number of submissions and our desire to be as inclusive as possible, each participant will be strictly limited to only one paper or media presentation and one other activity (such as session chair or discussant), for a maximum of two appearances. Participation in the Making and Doing event (see below) is not counted toward this limit.

Location

The meeting will be held at the Sheraton Boston Hotel, 39 Dalton Street. Our room block for this meeting is limited, so please book early if you want to stay at the conference hotel.

To reserve a room at the conference rate, call the Starwood Reservations Center at Reservation Center at 1.888.627.7054 provide the group code ‘4H29AA’ or simply book online.

Program

A preliminary program is available. You can browse the interactive program or download the PDF here. (1 MB)

Registration

Registration is now open. Please read the details  first.

How to register

This year, meeting registration will take place on the 4S Members site. If you submitted a paper or are listed as a presenter or author on an accepted paper, you already have an account with the site. Please avoid creating a duplicate account--it will only cause confusion. If you don't know your login credentials, use the 'forgot password' link. When you update your password, your user name will be displayed on the confirmation screen. 

If you do not see the member rates offered after you log in, you may elect to join 4S before registering. Use the 'Membership' link in the menu. (Note:  If you see the message "Your membership is current and does not expire" when you log in, it means you do not have an active 4S membership. The message is referring to your Guest Membership in the web site. Apologies for the confusing language.)

This year you can pay online immediately upon registering, or you may select the "bill me" option and print an invoice to be processed by your institution. Subsequent payment may be made online or by bank transfer. Find bank information here. 4S strongly prefers online payment upon registration, for obvious reasons: pursuing people for payment is a nuisance for all involved.

For technical support, contact the administrator.

Fees

Early rates apply through June 23. ‘Concession’ rates apply to students and all unwaged or low waged.  Concession rates are meant for people such as students, retirees, under/unemployed, those living in economically disadvantaged countries, and others for whom paying the full rate would be a hardship.  Determination of eligibility is left to the registrant.

    Concession Professional
Member Early  $190 $290
  Regular  $290 $390
Non-member Early  $290 $390
  Regular  $390 $490

Cancellation Policy

After July 14, cancellations will be accepted with a refund of 50%. Any cancellations after August 4 will not be refunded.

REGISTER HERE

4S Monitoring Travel Ban and Boycotts

4S has published a statement on the rapidly evolving U.S. political situation, reaffirming the internationalism of 4S, in fact and spirit, as well as our deep appreciation for the diverse experiences and perspectives that 4S members bring to our collective work. We encourage anyone planning to submit an abstract to do so, even if they may be prevented from attending the conference owing either to border restrictions or to matters of conscience.  If the Executive Order remains in place into the summer, those unable or unwilling to attend will be included in the program, and their decisions regarding participation noted as requested.

Meeting Highlights

Presidential Plenary – Interrogating ‘the Threat’

Wednesday August 30th

A critical conversation regarding what we should be concerned about, as both STS scholars and members of wider publics 

Invited Session: Reproductive Justice and Injustice

Bridging scholarship and activism, this special session will take up critical issues of reproductive justice and injustice here in Boston and around the globe

Making and Doing Presentations

Sharing scholarly practices of participation, engagement, and intervention in their fields of study

Affiliated Events

Enacting Environmental Data Justice:  A 4S Pre-Meeting Event

Tuesday, August 29, 4-8pm

As the new presidential administration threatens to curtail environmental agencies and their infrastructures of data collection, a powerful grassroots movement has formed to archive and protect federally-maintained datasets and associated curated information. You are invited to attend an experimental workshop titled Enacting Environmental Data Justice.

Film Screening: "Healing Fukushima"

Thursday, August 31, 6-8pm

Sulfikar Amir will be screening his documentary film called “Healing Fukushima” at MIT following the Making and Doing event. Mike Fischer is hosting the screening and chairing the after-screening discussion. Three speakers will discuss the film, including Scott Knowles (Drexel), Masashi Shirabe (Tokyo Tech), and Kim Fortun (Rensselaer, to be confirmed). . Check out the film trailer and full synopsis

Important Dates

Nov 15. Call for open panels proposals 
Jan 1. Submission closes for open panels
Jan 15.  Call for closed/invited sessions and individual paper submissions and Making and Doing session proposals
March 1. Deadline for submission of closed sessions and individual papers
April 15. Acceptance notification 
May 15.  Preliminary program
June 23. End of early registration
July 21. Registration deadline to be included in the program

Pluralizing Language in the Age of Trump and Brexit: An Invitation for the Upcoming 4S Conference (and beyond)

Afrikaans

Arabic

Bengali

Chinese (simplified)

Chinese (traditional)

French

German

Hindi

Portuguese

Russian

Spanish

Xhosa

At the Boston 2017 conference, 4S invites presenters to deliver papers in languages other than English. 4S recognizes that xenophobia and nationalism are on the rise in many places. While English has become a scientific lingua franca that has been favoured in communications and networking across the globe, it is the official language of just a handful of countries, most prominently the United States of America and the United Kingdom. The current policies of these two countries send a message of insulation and parochialism to the world, explicitly threatening the richness and importance of human difference. In response, the aim of this initiative is to decenter English as the de facto language of this and other international conferences. Linguistic pluralism should be welcomed and encouraged to make clear that the world is irreducibly plural. 

While this invitation is particularly extended to those whose first language is not English, even monolingual English speaker may have parts or all of their presentation written or audio-recorded in another language by another speaker. There are many ways to represent linguistic pluralism and we encourage creativity in this regard. To secure full understanding of each presentation, presenters should provide English translation, which can be distributed in various ways: a full paper, a summary, slides that accompany the talk, or other inventive forms. 

This will of course be a collective experiment the first time through, in which we’ll trial different ways in which presenters can express their ideas in the language with which they feel most comfortable, while also making those ideas accessible to English speaking participants. We would like to extend a further request to anyone willing to translate this invitation into (an)other language(s) and also perhaps to aid in the creation of English summaries for circulation at the conference.  If you are able and willing to contribute to this effort, please contact Maurizio at m.meloni@sheffield.ac.uk.

Thanks to translators, ElHassan ElSabry, Jiuheng He, Aadita Chaudhury, HungYin Tsai, Aimé Dafon Sègla, Susanne Oechsner, Ivan da Costa Marques, Daria Dementeva, Olga Doletskaya, Igor Lyustritskiy, Claudia Castañeda

Program Committee

Heather Paxson (MIT, Chair)
Daniel Breslau (Virginia Tech)
Claudia Castañeda (Emerson College)
Tarleton Gillespie (Cornell, Microsoft Research New England)
Mary Gray (Indiana University, Microsoft Research New England)
Clare Kim (MIT)
Nick Seaver (Tufts)
Banu Subramaniam (University of Massachusetts-Amherst)
TL Taylor (MIT)
Lucy Suchman (Lancaster University)

Travel Grants

Applications for grants to support travel to the meeting for students and other low-income scholars are now closed.

Original Call for Papers, Panels, and Making and Doing Presentations

Deadline for Submission: March 1, 2017

While submissions are closed, you can log in and view yours or edit contact information here.

Papers

Paper submissions should be in the form of abstracts of up to 250 words. They should include the paper’s main arguments, methods, and contributions to STS. You may choose to submit your paper abstract to an open panel, or you can leave panel selection to the program organizers.  In addition to designating one or more topical Research Areas using the drop-down menu, please list up to five keywords to help the program organizers evaluate and assign your paper.

Sessions

Each session proposal should contain a summary and rationale of up to 250 words, including a brief discussion of its contribution to STS.  A session proposal must contain a minimum of three paper abstracts conforming to the criteria above and may contain up to five, plus a discussant. If the proposal contains fewer than five papers, the Program Committee may assign additional papers to your session to optimize scheduling and participation.

Open Panels

Prior to opening submissions, the program Committee accepted 129 proposals to host Open Panels. Their descriptions are available for perusal across four pages via the menu at left. When submitting a paper, you have the option of nominating your paper for up to three Open Panels. 

The purpose of calling for open panel proposals is to stimulate the formation of new networks around topics of interest to the 4S community. Like any meeting panel, an open panel is a paper session with a theme and a responsible chairperson(s). In contrast to traditional ("closed") session proposals, open panel topics are included in the call for papers, and authors nominate their paper for one or more panels. 

Making and Doing Session

In addition to paper and session submissions, 4S invites proposed presentations for the ‘STS Making and Doing’ event.  Participation in the Making and Doing event does not count toward limits on conference participation described elsewhere. Making and Doing proposals are submitted through a dedicated form found at the same location as paper and session submissions. 

Contact Information

For information on conference and program practices, acceptance status, and scheduling, contact the Program Chair, Heather Paxson.

For technical assistance with the submission or registration process, contact the 4S Administrator.