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Society for Social Studies of Science

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Events

Events include paper calls for conferences, workshops, lectures, seminars, and exhibits (listed in chronological order).

1st International Conference on Language, Data and Knowledge

June 19 2017 to June 20 2017 | http://www.ldk2017.org/

Deadline: February 23 2017

http://www.ldk2017.org/

Updated: March 10 2017

The new biennial conference series on Language, Data and Knowledge (LDK) aims at bringing together researchers from across disciplines concerned with the acquisition, curation and use of language data in the context of data science and knowledge-based applications. With the advent of the Web and digital technologies, an ever increasing amount of language data is now available across application areas and industry sectors, including social media, digital archives, company records, etc. The efficient and meaningful exploitation of this data in scientific and commercial innovation is at the core of data science research, employing NLP and machine learning methods as well as semantic technologies based on knowledge graphs

Language data is of increasing importance to machine learning-based approaches in NLP, Linked Data and Semantic Web research and applications that depend on linguistic and semantic annotation with lexical, terminological and ontological resources, manual alignment across language or other human-assigned labels. The acquisition, provenance, representation, maintenance, usability, quality as well as legal, organizational and infrastructure aspects of language data are therefore rapidly becoming major areas of research that are at the focus of the conference.

Knowledge graphs is an active field of research concerned with the extraction, integration, maintenance and use of semantic representations of language data in combination with semantically or otherwise structured data, numerical data and multimodal data among others. Knowledge graph research builds on the exploitation and extension of lexical, terminological and ontological resources, information and knowledge extraction, entity linking, ontology learning, ontology alignment, semantic text similarity, Linked Data and other Semantic Web technologies. The construction and use of knowledge graphs from language data, possibly and ideally in the context of other types of data, is a further specific focus of the conference.

A further focus of the conference is the combined use and exploitation of language data and knowledge graphs in data science-based approaches to use cases in industry, including biomedical applications, as well as use cases in humanities and social sciences.

The LDK conference has been initiated by a consortium of researchers from the Insight Centre for Data Analytics, InfAI (University Leipzig) and Wolfgang Goethe University and a Scientific Committee of leading researchers in Natural Language Processing, Linked Data and Semantic Web, Language Resources and Digital Humanities. LDK is endorsed by several international organisations: DBpedia, ACL SIGANN, Global Wordnet Association, CLARIN and Big Data Value Association (BDVA). The first edition, LDK 2017, will be held in Galway (Ireland) with a second edition planned for 2019 in Leipzig (Germany).

Important Dates

23 February 2017 Paper submission 30 March 2017 Notification 20 April 2017 Camera-ready submission 19-20 June 2017 Conference

Get the Picture. Digital Methods for Visual Research

June 26 2017 to July 11 2017 | University of Amsterdam

Deadline: May 05 2017

https://wiki.digitalmethods.net/Dmi/SummerSchool2017

Updated: March 10 2017

Gillian Rose employs the term visual methodologies for “researching with visual materials” (2016). Iconography, semiotics, framing analysis and multimodal analysis are among the approaches that may be applied to digital materials. One may also ask, does the online make a difference to the study of the visual? That is, with which approaches is the image considered primarily, or secondarily, as a digital object embedded in online media? Apart from the change in the setting of the object, there may also be methods that emerge from the new media, engines and platforms. What kinds of so-called ‘natively’ digital methods can be repurposed productively for visual analysis? How to make use of the Google’s reverse image search? More broadly, with the increasing focus on selfies and memes but also on Instagram stories, animated gifs, filters, stickers and emoticons, social media and digital communications are pushing for a visual turn in the study of digital culture. Such a push invites visual analysis into the realm of digital studies, too. One may begin to open the discussion of interplay by examining the new outputs such as journalists’ data visualisations as well as policy-makers’ dashboards like the open data city platforms.

One may similarly compare visual literacies. Are there new ways of interpreting images through data, both substantively (which are the related materials?) and temporally (how do they develop over time? do they resonate? are they memes?). In digital methods, the image is not only a research object but also a research device. Making images “that can be seen and manipulated” (Venturini, Jacomy & Pereira 2015) enables scholars to access and actively explore datasets. How to make them and read them? At the same time, the technical properties of digital images both in terms of their color, resolution, and timestamp, as well as their ‘networkedness’, traceability and resonance, become available for research, allowing one to think with images (as visual guides and narratives) as well as through them (as data objects). Novel visual methodologies then emerge.

There is the ‘active’ data visualisation, which includes research protocol diagrams, data dashboards, visual network analysis, and issue mapping. Protocol diagrams (Figure 1) guide analysts, programmers and designers through their collaborative research project. Data dashboards offer a visual aid for data metrics and analytics, in side-by-side graphs and tables; or become critical tools (as in the People’s Dashboard ). Visual network analysis offers a way into data that can be engaged with and requires an active research attitude (Venturini, Jacomy & Pereira 2015). Issue mapping renders legible the actors and substance of a (possibly controversial) issue (Rogers, Sánchez-Querubín & Kil 2015). In a second group of approaches, the image is treated as a digitised or natively digital object of study. This includes visual and cultural analytics, which provide distant visual reading techniques to explore and plot visual objects such as selfies and websites based on their formal properties (Manovich 2014; Ben-David, Amram & Bekkerman 2016). Networked visual content analysis, in which images may be queried ‘in reverse’ to study their circulation, can be used to critically assess questions of representation and cultural standing (Figure 2). Another group of approaches repurpose visual formats, where more playful explorations appropriate (and tweak) the templates and visual aesthetics of the web, creating research GIFs and critical social media profiles (Figure 3). In this 10th Digital Methods Summer School we will explore and expand such digital methods for visual research, and critically inquire into their proposed epistemologies. We look forward to welcoming you to Amsterdam in the Summertime! Summer School Philosophy The Digital Methods Summer School is exploratory and experimental.

It is not a setting for ‘just’ tool training or for principally tool-driven research. Substantive research projects are conceived and carried out. Participants are encouraged to ‘span time with their issue’ and the materials. In other words, we heed Alexander Galloway’s admonition about data and tool-driven work: “Those who were formerly scholars or experts in a certain area are now recast as mere tool users beholden to the affordances of the tool — while students spend ever more time mastering menus and buttons, becoming literate in a digital device rather than a literary corpus” (Galloway 2014:127). We encourage device and corpus literacy! The device training we ask you to do prior to the Summer School through online tutorials, and at the Summer School itself, in a kind of flipped learning environment (if you'll excuse the overused phrase), we would like to believe that you have familiarised yourself already with the tools and completed the tutorials available online. During the Summer School we will discuss and tinker with the nitty-gritty, aim to invent new methods, techniques and heuristics and create the first iterations of compelling work to be shared. About Digital Methods as a Concept Digital methods is a term coined as a counterpoint to virtual methods, which typically digitize existing methods and port them onto the Web. Digital methods, contrariwise, seek to learn from the methods built into the dominant devices online, and repurpose them for social and cultural research.

That is, the challenge is to study both the info-web as well as the social web with the tools that organize them. There is a general protocol to digital methods. At the outset stock is taken of the natively digital objects that are available (links, tags, threads, etc.) and how devices such as search engines make use of them. Can the device techniques be repurposed, for example by remixing the digital objects they take as inputs? Once findings are made with online data, where to ground them? Is the baseline still the offline, or are findings to be grounded in more online data? Taking up these questions more theoretically (but also practically) there is also a Digital Methods book (MIT Press, 2013) as well as a complementary Issue Mapping book (Amsterdam University Press, 2015), and other digital methods publications .

Intersecting Processes

May 27 2017 to May 30 2017 | Old Fire Station, Woods Hole MA

Deadline: March 31 2017

http://bit.ly/NewSSCa

Updated: March 10 2017

New England Workshop on Science and Social Change
(*a limited number can participate from a distance via google+ hangout)

In this four-day workshop participants will create spaces, interactions, and support in formulating plans to extend our own projects of inquiry and engagement around "intersecting processes." Taylor and García Barrios (1995; following Wolf 1982, 387 ) introduced the term to capture the ways that social and environmental change involves processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales and drawing on elements as diverse as the local climate and geo-morphology, social norms, work relations, and national political economic policy. Such intersecting processes are interlinked in the production of any outcome and in their own on-going transformation. An equivalent picture fits the changing structures we face in many areas, such as biomedicine and epidemiology, agriculture and ecological restoration, political economy and mental illness, science and social theory, project-based learning and fostering creativity. To understand such complexity requires our attention to the ways the intersecting processes transgress boundaries and restructure “internal” dynamics, thus ensuring that the situations do not have clearly defined boundaries and are not simply governed by coherent, internally driven dynamics. Engaging with such complexity invites agents to link "transversally" across different kinds of agents and scale, not to focus on one class or place or dynamic.

Activities during the workshop will, as they have at NewSSC since 2004, build on what the particular group of participants contribute and employ a range of tools and processes for "connecting, probing, and reflecting" so as to support and learn from each others' inquiries. The workshop format, in brief, includes an activity together as a group each morning and again for an hour at the end of the day. In between, time is spent in independent research related to the workshop topic, in conversations, and in other pursuits that participants find helpful for advancing our projects. The intended outcomes include: a) products that reflect our inquiries and plans, conveyed in work-in-progress presentations (10-15 minutes) and revised in response to feedback so as to be shared outside the workshop, b) experiences that motivate us to take our individual projects beyond their current scope or level of activity, and c) stock-taking towards developing the workshop format. This year, with a view to assembling and distributing a collective product that can engage and influence wider audiences, the expectation of a shareable product is emphasized. In this spirit, travel subsidies will be guaranteed for participants who submit a draft working paper in advance and revise it by the end of the workshop. Applications are sought from teachers, researchers, graduate students, and activists who are interested in facilitating discussion, reflection, avid learning, and clarifying one's identity and affinities in relation to the workshop topic. The workshop format allows for a limited number of participants over the internet. Newcomers and return participants are welcome.

Registration is on a sliding scale--$125 (for those with low incomes and lack of travel support) up to $300 (for those with a decent income and institutional/grant support). Registration covers meal costs, but not accommodation, which is at a local, moderately priced motel. The funding available to help get people to the workshop is modest, but we have managed to subsidize travel and accommodation in past years according to need (which favors graduate students and independent scholars). Online participant registration is on a sliding scale: $50 - $125. Some funding support may be supplied by The Pumping Station. For an extra charge, 1-3 graduate credits are available for workshop participation and completion of a related project.

Applications via http://bit.ly/NewSSCa (Spaces still available as of 3/6/17) For more details, see http://sicw.wikispaces.com/newsscarrangements Participants should talk to the organizer or assistant before the workshop to explore ideas for developing projects making good use of the workshop format. Organizer: Peter J. Taylor, University of Massachusetts Boston, Science in a Changing World graduate track, http://www.cct.umb.edu/sicw

Doctoral School of Social Studies of Science and Technology in Latin America

September 18 2017 to September 20 2017 | Universidad Nacional de Colombia

Deadline: September 18 2017

http://www.esocite.la/escuela/bogota2017

Updated: March 10 2017

En la Facutad de Ciencias Humanas de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, tendrá lugar entre el 19-21 de septiembre de 2017, el VIII Taller Latinoamericano de Jóvenes Investigadores en Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad, y la V Escuela Doctoral de Estudios Sociales y Políticos sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología de ESOCITE (la Sociedad Latinoamericana en Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y la Tecnología), en la que se buscará reunir a un colectivo de jóvenes investigadores e investigadoras (alrededor de 30) en fase avanzada de redacción de sus tesis, con sus directores de tesis e investigadores consolidados del campo disciplinar, con el objeto de debatir las preguntas y los diseños de investigación así como las metodologías aplicadas, los avances que ya han realizado en sus investigaciones y sus aportes al campo CTS y a las sociedades de la Región. Se pretende que los jóvenes tengan un espacio privilegiado en la formación de una comunidad científica, compartido con investigadores consolidados, con mayor trayectoria en el campo de los estudios sociales y políticos de la ciencia y la tecnología en el espacio iberoamericano. De manera especial, se espera poder incidir en la potenciación de las redes de conocimiento entre los investigadores y las instituciones públicas y privadas de I+D+I de la región, enfatizando la inserción y fortalecimiento de la Red CTS-Colombia en el campo disciplinar en la Región. Para esta convocatoria se considerará como jóvenes investigadores e investigadoras a estudiantes de doctorado avanzados de todos los países de América Latina (se aceptará a 25 como máximo) y a estudiantes de maestría avanzados de instituciones colombianas (se aceptará a cinco como máximo). El encuentro cuenta con el auspicio del Grupo de Trabajo CLACSO “Ciencia y sociedad: los usos sociales del conocimiento en América Latina y la inclusión social”. A continuación del Taller/Escuela la Facultad de Ciencias Humanas de la UNC realizará, en la misma sede, el II Coloquio Nacional ESOCITE con la participación de destacados académicos, al cual están todos los asistentes y participantes cordialmente invitados. La asistencia a este coloquio no tiene costo, pero el alojamiento y manutención correrá por cuenta de los interesados.
Comité Científico
Dra. Rosalba Casas, IIS-UNAM (México); Dr. Jorge Gibert, Universidad de Valparaíso, (Chile); Dr. Yuri Jack Gómez, Universidad Nacional (Colombia), Dr. Pablo Kreimer, Universidad Maimónides, (Argentina), Dra. Tania Pérez-Bustos, Universidad Nacional, (Colombia), Dra. Olga Restrepo, Universidad Nacional (Colombia), Dr. Ronny Viales, Universidad de Costa Rica; Dr. Irlan Von Linsingen, Universidad Federal de Santa Catarina, (Brasil).

The World Congress of Sociology

July 15 2017 to July 21 2017 | Toronto, Canada

Deadline: March 15 2017

http://www.isa-sociology.org/en/conferences/world-congress/toronto- 2018/guidelines-for-program-coordinators/

Updated: March 10 2017

RC 23 (Sociology of Science and Technology) encourages you to organize a session at the upcoming World Congress. All topics relevant to the sociology of science and technology are appropriate. However, given the restricted number of session slots allocated to the RC, organizers are encouraged to avoid excessively narrow topics. To facilitate inclusion of as many individuals as possible, the Co-coordinators intend to include a variety of session formats. For additional details on potential session formats.

History & Pedagogy of Mathematics

March 31 2017 to April 02 2017 | Philadelphia, PA

Deadline: March 01 2017

http://www.hpm-americas.org/upcoming/

Updated: March 10 2017

The Americas Section of the International Study Group on the Relations Between the History and Pedagogy of Mathematics (HPM-Americas) is pleased to announce a meeting from Friday, March 31, to Sunday, April 2, 2017, at the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia.

We seek a variety of talks on relations between the history and pedagogy of mathematics. At this meeting we hope to feature a special session on the history and pedagogy of mathematics in engineering. We encourage submissions of paper proposals in this area.

Talks will be about 25 minutes long, followed by abundant time for discussion.

Abstracts of proposed talks need to be received by March 1, 2017. They can either be submitted via this website or sent to Dave Roberts at robertsdl@aol.com.

Travelling Codes Workshop MECS Luneburg

March 30 2017 to March 31 2017 | Luneburg, Germany

Deadline: March 29 2017

http://www.leuphana.de/dfg-programme/mecs/veranstaltungen/traveling-codes-2017.html

Updated: March 10 2017

Programme Please have a look at the attached programme or visit the website.

Keynote by Matthias Heymann (Aarhus)

Talks by Paul N. Edwards (Michigan), Hélène Guillemot (Paris), Simon Hirsbrunner (Siegen), Antonia Walford (Copenhagen), Catharina Landström (Oxford), Helge Peters (Oxford), Ronlyn Duncan (Lincoln) & Marc Tadaki (British Columbia), Isabell Schrickel (Luneburg)

Registration To register, please send an email to mecs@leuphana.de

Topic of the workshop Environmental science and, in particular, climate science is a highly international and interdisciplinary endeavor aiming at global coverage of environmental changes in long-term trends, and at global projections of possible future developments. However, current developments in both climate science and politics question the focus on the globality of the ‘vast machine’ which climate science has become (Edwards, 2010), as calls have intensified for new forms of regional and local knowledge about the effects of climate change and efforts to tackle them, for instance in the form of regional ‘climate services‘.

Against this background, this workshop seeks to use the metaphor of ‘traveling code‘ to make sense of what happens when climate science travels – whether in the form of mobile scientific tools, models, and software codes, circulating data sets and standards, or prominent artifacts like scientific images, knowledge claims or numerical targets. These forms and instances of traveling code encounter diverse cultural and political contexts which, on the one hand, involve a multitude of scientists, politicians, and citizens, with every community arguably incorporating and adapting the ‘codes’ of climate science differently. On the other hand, we may observe universalizing effects of ‘traveling codes’ – the smoothing of epistemic landscapes and the globalisation of scientific practice. This tension, between what we might call ‘localisation‘ and ‘globalisation‘, is of core interest for the workshop, along with the question of how exactly these ‘codes’ travel –through which social and media technologies– between different disciplines and knowledge cultures. What are the software codes, models, standards, data sets and images, the artifacts of climate science, that help us to understand and increasingly shape our world and future, and how have they migrated from their sites of production to new sites of application and interpretation?

Organised by Gabriele Gramelsberger (MECS | Leuphana and University Witten/Herdecke) Isabell Schrickel (CCP | CGSC) | Leuphana) Martin Mahony (School of Geography | University of Nottingham)

Additional programme on Saturday // 2017 April, 1 11:00-14:00 The Paris Agreement – Eine Lesung (in German); public reading performance of the Paris Agreement with citizens of Lüneburg, venue: Rathaus (town hall of Luneburg)

Data Publics

March 31 2017 to April 02 2017 | Lancaster University

Deadline: January 22 2017

http://www.datapublics.net

Updated: February 08 2017

The name selected is The Public” *(John Dewey, 1927). There is a tension between how “publics” form spontaneously (for example in response to economic hardship, to create support groups, to protest about particular matters of concern) and how online users with similar consumption, browsing, movement patterns become grouped and acted upon as units of data, whether by organisations, researchers, or others. When people collectively and publicly self-organise to form a group, the identity of participants as well as the collective grouping itself may be apparent to all involved.

However, with the rise, across a range of fields of digital and algorithmic technologies that work by segmenting people according to shared sets of interests, objectives, behavioural traits, and/or political persuasions, these processes as well as the identities of participants tends to be invisible to those involved. In the latter, it is only when these acts of ‘assigned’ collectivisation are exposed, perhaps deliberately (e.g. when confronting published research), perhaps unexpectedly (e.g. via data hacks/leaks), or perhaps when group self-recognition is achieved by users (e.g. via transparency apps/tools, social media, activism, freedom of information requests), that those involved begin to recognise their status as a “public”. This conference will investigate the diverse ways in which data-mediated publics are, and can be, constituted, provoked, threatened, understood, and represented. This includes examining the role played in the formation of publics by new on- and offline infrastructures, data visualisations, social and economic practices, research methods and creative practices, and emerging and future technologies. Specifically, the event will facilitate cross-cutting conversations between designers, social scientists and creative technologists to explore the new challenges and opportunities afforded by thinking and working with “Data Publics”.

This conference will be inherently interdisciplinary and as such we seek contributions from researchers within the areas of social science, design, new media art, data visualisation, and human-computer interaction. It will take place over three days, and will comprise a combination of hands-on workshops, paper presentations and an exhibition of work. Day one will provide hands-on introductions to key methods for investigating data publics, involving two workshops running in parallel. One workshop – ‘Digital Methods/Data Visualisation’, led by David Moats – will introduce the digital methods and data visualisation approaches that can be used to conduct research in this field. The other – ‘Strategies, Tools and Participatory Processes’, led by Clara Crivellaro – will explore the practicalities of using design strategies, tools and participatory socio-technical processes to support the emergence and formation of publics.

The day will end with participants from the two workshops entering into dialogue. Following the workshops, the next two days will feature a mixture of academic paper presentations and exhibits from participants, with a focus throughout on the way a diverse array of methods, analytical approaches, representational techniques and practical engagements might be related to one another, put in conversation and combined. Participants are warmly invited to presents digital artefacts, data-visualisations or performances alongside their academic work or as stand-alone pieces that explore the topic of data-publics. For participation in the conference, we seek two forms of contributions: full papers and works to exhibit.

*CALL FOR ABSTRACTS AND EXHIBITS* We seek either (a) abstracts for papers or (b) descriptions of exhibits that each engage with the formation, relevance, and effects of “Data Publics ”. We invite contributions from professionals, scholars, designers, artists, activists, and those in other related fields, working in areas including but not limited to sociology, anthropology, geography, digital methods, interaction design, datavisualisation, human-computer interaction, and art. The deadline for submission is *January 22nd, 2017*. Contributions should address at least one of the following three themes: *1. Digital Economies / The Effects of Data Publics* ● What are the social, economic, ethical (and other) implications of emerging and future data publics? ● How are data-oriented publics constituted, including in relation to digital economies? ● Through which registers of everyday experience (e.g. as associated with making financial decisions, seeking emotional support, campaigning for change) do individuals participate in such publics? *2. Emergence and Complexity / The Behaviours of Data Publics* ● How do different conditions (e.g. social, technological, affective) impact the emergence of data-oriented publics? ● What new design paradigms are enabled with large-scale data publics? ● How might we better conceptualise and work with complex data publics? ● How are new technologies affecting the shape/direction of data publics ? *3. Methods / Interactions and interventions with Data Publics* ● How can we intervene in the formation, stabilisation, destabilisation, and transformation of publics? What role might such methods/creative practices themselves play in the constitution of data publics? ● What forms of creative practice/visualisation/interaction design/human-computer interaction are needed to engage with data publics and to either support the emergence of or sustain such publics? ● What (new/existing/combination of) methods/tools are required to study/shape the emergence/fate of data publics?

*HOW TO SUBMIT* *Those interested in participating in the conference* should submit either a paper abstract including 5-10 indicative references, or a description of the work to be exhibited including, if relevant, a maximum of 5 illustrative images and an additional description of any technical/spatial requirements the exhibit has. Submissions of no more than 500 words should be sent to datapublics@lancaster.ac.uk by *January 22nd* (descriptions of technical/spatial requirements and references are not included in the word count). We encourage participants to attend both the conference and a workshop, but it is not a requirement. Therefore, *please also indicate in the submission* whether you wish to attend (a) the conference and a workshop, or (b) just the conference. If you wish to attend a workshop please also indicate (c) whether you are interested in the ‘Digital Methods/ Data Visualisation’ workshop or the ‘Strategies, Tools and Participatory Processes’ workshop. *Those interested in participating in just a workshop and not the conference*, please email datapublics@lancaster.ac.uk again by *January 22nd* indicating whether you are interested in the ‘Digital Methods/Data Visualisation’ workshop or the ‘Strategies, Tools and Participatory Processes’ workshop. Please also, in no more than 100 words, state why you wish to attend. As places on the workshop are limited, this will help us select participants if necessary. If applying for a reduced fee (see below), please also state your reasons for doing so (100 words maximum).

*REGISTRATION FEES* *Conference + workshop:* £110 (Students/unwaged may apply for a reduced fee of £55). *Conference only:* £90 (Students/unwaged may apply for a reduced fee of £45) *Workshop only:* £60 (Students/unwaged may apply for a reduced fee of £30) *(Reduced fee places are limited and will be allocated first to those without recourse to external funding and then on a first come first served basis.)* *PARTNERS & ORGANISERS*

Theorizing the Web 2017

April 07 2017 to April 08 2017 | New York City

Deadline: January 22 2017

http:// theorizingtheweb.tumblr.com/2017

Updated: February 08 2017

At the Museum of the Moving Image, in Astoria, Queens..
Started in 2011, Theorizing the Web is an annual event for critical, conceptual conversations about technology and society. Theorizing the Web begins with the assumption that to talk about technology is also to discuss the self and the social world. Debate around digital social technologies too often fails to apply the many relevant literatures of social thought. We do not think “theorizing” is solely the domain of academia, and we value clear and compelling arguments that avoid jargon. Here are some photos from last year’s event if you want to see the vibe of it all. Theorizing the Web is a home for thinking about technology by people who may not think of themselves primarily as “tech” thinkers. Activists, journalists, technologists, writers, artists, and people who don’t identify as any of the above are all encouraged to submit. We especially invite submissions that engage with issues of social justice, power, inequality, and vulnerability from a diverse range of perspectives. Submissions on any topic are welcome. Some general topical suggestions include the intersections between technology and identity, privacy, sexuality, the body, power, politics, surveillance, racism, sexism, ableism, harassment, space, code, design, knowledge, images, memes, attention, work, fiction, gaming, globalization, capitalism, and protest. Submissions should be 300 to 500 words (only the first 500 words will be reviewed).

The TtW Selection Committee will blindly review submissions and make decisions in early to mid-February. Space is limited, and our acceptance rate is typically 20-35%. The presentations themselves will be 12-minute talks in a panel setting. You will be speaking to a general audience who may not share your area of expertise. Before submitting, please read our FAQ section on submissions.

“Interdisciplinary Encounters: Exploring Knowledge-Making Across Boundaries”

March 10 2017 to March 11 2017 | University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Deadline: January 17 2017

http://seeingsystems.illinois.edu

Updated: December 08 2016

UIUC Graduate Science and Technology Studies Workshop

The Seeing Systems INTERSECT group is delighted to announce “Interdisciplinary Encounters: Exploring Knowledge-Making Across Boundaries” UIUC Graduate Science and Technology Studies (STS) Workshop. We invite scholars from across disciplines and regional locales whose work connects with STS, digital studies, media studies, communication, information sciences, informatics and design to submit proposals for a two-day workshop addressing diverse themes in the social making of facts, social histories of media and technology, user networks in practice, visual cultures and interactive technologies.

We welcome a range of formats — including standard paper presentations, posters, demonstrations, and hands-on workshops — as well as work intersectional with feminist, anti-racist, transnational, decolonial, queer, and ecological potentials in science and technology studies (STS) and in critical making. The event will also feature faculty-facilitated conversations, campus and nature walks, scavenging exercises, workshops on local citizen science, and keynotes by:

Jenny Reardon, director of The Science and Justice Research Center at the University of California – Santa Cruz, and Max Liboiron, founder of the Civic Laboratory for Environmental Action Research (CLEAR), a feminist marine biology and technology lab at Memorial University in Newfoundland.

We invite work representing a variety of regions and sites, and aim for a gathering that is aware of its context and the opportunities afforded by local contextual considerations for scholarship and research. And we underscore what midwest STS scholars have noted, while the Midwest is often overlooked as a “deindustrial periphery,” it has thriving technoscientific and political groundswells amongst its histories of settler-colonialism (including Black technocultures, independent media, femtech, citizen science, community making, and indigenous presence and practice).

We invite 500–800 word proposals for a variety of formats—from standard talks (15 min.) to hands-on activities with interdisciplinary methods (30–40 min.). Proposals should include a:

§ Preliminary title (10 words or less);

§ 5 keywords, concepts, or themes that your project can be tagged by;

§ Description of the content and style of your presentation (500 word max.);

§ Short personal/academic biography, which also elaborates on your interest in participating (300 word max.);

§ Any details about the potential space and tech needs of your paper/project/workshop.

Please submit your proposal by January 17, 2017 via the online form at: https://illinois.edu/fb/sec/8043933.

* For any questions, contact SeeingSystemsUIUC@gmail.com.

We aim to finalize participants by February 15, 2017. Please see publish.illinois.edu/seeingsystems for further information about the workshop.






How online media are changing science communication

Deadline: May 01 2017

mc.manuscriptcentral.com/sc.

Updated: December 08 2016

Call for papers for a special issue of Science Communication Public science in a wired world
Guest Editors: Sarah R Davies (University of Copenhagen), Joachim Allgaier (Alpen-Adria University Klagenfurt), and Noriko Hara (Indiana University).

Science communication – public dissemination and debate of scientific knowledge – is increasingly taking place online. From the websites of scientific organizations such as universities or scholarly societies to social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook groups or Reddit, science is negotiated by public audiences in online spaces alongside traditional formats such as the mass media, public lectures, or popular science writing. Social research is starting to engage with these spaces and tools, and to understand how science communication is produced and consumed in digital and social media. Recent work has, for example, explored how authority is negotiated in science blogs (Riesch & Mendel 2013), what kind of science is presented online (Brossard 2013), how Twitter is used to engage with scientific projects (Gastrow 2015; Kahle et al 2016), or how blogging is used to manage scientific identity (Steinke 2013). As of yet, however, there has been no dedicated volume or special issue devoted to science communication in digital and social media, and this emergent body of research remains dispersed. This special issue will showcase cutting edge research in online science communication and thereby consolidate and draw together this emerging field.

Potential focus areas for papers (which may use any recognized systematic methodological approach, whether qualitative or quantitative) might include (but are not limited to):

* Science videos on YouTube, TED or other platforms; * Science as a social media phenomenon (such as Facebook pages or science on Twitter); * Science blogging by scientists or non-scientists; * University websites and online branding activities; * The role of science journalism in an online era; * Online public information campaigns (such as Science: It’s a Girl Thing!); * Discussion forums and online dialogue and debate by scientists or non-scientists.

We welcome papers that interrogate these developments by critically exploring, for instance, how online media are affecting scientific authority, the visions of science that are being constructed through online communication, the reception and interpretation of science online, or how online science communication is managed, produced and/or misused.

Full papers are due May 1, 2017, for publication likely in late 2017 or early 2018. Earlier submissions are very strongly encouraged. Mention the special issue in your cover letter. Late papers may be considered if extra space is available. Papers should follow the Science Communication guidelines for length and format; submit at mc.manuscriptcentral.com/sc. Our ideal manuscript is between 7,000 and 9,000 words, inclusive of notes, references, and other material. Additional guidelines can be found at scx.sagepub.com. Queries regarding the special issue can be addressed to the guest editors (Sarah Davies, Joachim Allgaier, and Noriko Hara; contact at srdavies@hum.ku.dk) or to the journal’s editor, Susanna Priest, at editorscicom@gmail.com.

References Brossard D (2013) New media landscapes and the science information consumer. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110(Supplement 3): 14096–14101. Gastrow M (2015) Science and the Social Media in an African Context The Case of the Square Kilometre Array Telescope. Science Communication 37(6): 703–722. Kahle K, Sharon AJ and Baram-Tsabari A (2016) Footprints of Fascination: Digital Traces of Public Engagement with Particle Physics on CERN’s Social Media Platforms. PLOS ONE 11(5): e0156409. Riesch H and Mendel J (2013) Science Blogging: Networks, Boundaries and Limitations. Science as Culture 23(1): 51–72. Steinke J (2013) In Her Own Voice: Identity Centrality and Perceptions of Workplace Climate in Blogs by Women Scientists. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology 5(1): 25–51.

8th Tensions of Europe Conference

September 07 2017 to September 10 2017 | Athens

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr

Updated: December 08 2016

2nd Call for Papers: Borders and Technology. The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will have as its main theme the history of borders and technology. We invite papers studying the history of the relationship between national borders and transnational infrastructures, hidden technological linking and delinking that reinforced or challenged border delineations and demarcations, the relationship between borders and technologically-induced environmental crises and disasters, the virtualization of borders and the territories that they contain through the use of electronic and related technologies, geopolitics and technology, the redefinition of borders due to the use of technology (and vice versa), all the way from the production to the circulation and use of goods and commodities. One central aim is to cross-fertilize between disciplines and we therefore invite contributions from a wide variety of historical disciplines as well as from fields like Migration and Border Studies, Migration History, Mobility History, etc, especially in connection to borders and migrations from, to and within Europe.

Themes that fall under the general agenda of the Tensions of Europe network are very welcomed (e.g. transnational histories of technology, history of European infrastructures and networks, environment and technology, the democracy-technology relationship, conflicting interests and technology, technology and hidden integration, technology and culture, gender and technology, technology and ethnicity, technology and disability).

Tensions of Europe has a long tradition of fostering alternative meeting formats. We encourage proposals for non-traditional sessions with different formats and new ideas (e.g. round tables, agenda-building sessions, brainstorm sessions, break-out groups with assignments, poster discussion, film discussion, event-based sessions). As long as quality can be demonstrated, the program committee will not prioritize between formats. By quality we mean suggestions that promise constructive, stimulating and engaging discussion.

STGlobal Consortium

March 24 2017 to March 25 2017 | Washington, DC

Deadline: January 13 2017

www.stglobal.org

Updated: November 10 2016

17th Annual Student Conference •US STGlobal is a consortium of graduate and undergraduate programs focused on exploring the worlds of science policy and science, technology and society.

The STGlobal consortium presents its annual conference in Washington DC, in the scenic academic settings of the National Academy of Sciences and American Association for the Advancement of Science. The conference is run entirely by student volunteers and aims to create an environment for the presentation of work from emerging student-scholars.

STGlobal’s 17th annual event continues the chronicle of a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary collegial exchange. The conference attracts hundreds of students from around the world with diverse interests in Science, Technology and Society (STS) or Science and Technology Policy (STP) each year. The independent, student-led organizing committee also awards travel funds for those that are not located around the Greater Washington DC Metropolitan Area.

STGlobal inspires and challenges graduate students to contribute to discussions at the forefront of research in STP and STS, during any stage of the research process.

The Conference allows students three avenues to present their research: as part of a proposed full panel, as a paper presentation, or as a poster.

Submissions We welcome abstracts on completed research or works-in-progress on issues relevant to science & technology policy (STP) and science, technology and society (STS). We encourage submissions that highlight creative research and methodologies (ethnography, visual studies, digital media, etc.) in areas such as health, energy, sustainability, social justice, education, space studies, innovation, public policy, ethics, and the intersections between science, technology and the humanities. The above list is in no way exhaustive of the many topics within STS & STP scholarship. Paper Abstracts

Paper abstracts should be no longer than 300 words and demonstrate your paper’s connection to themes within STS and STP. We encourage submissions that highlight creative research and methodologies that work to bring STS in conversation with areas such as (but not limited to) health, energy, sustainability, social justice, education, space studies, innovation, public policy, ethics, governance, and the many intersections between science, technology, policy, and the humanities. All papers will also be considered for poster presentations. Panels

STGlobal accepts proposals for full panel presentations. Panels are built around a unifying theme, contain a minimum of three paper abstracts, and optionally a possible discussant. A discussant is not required to submit a proposal for a panel presentation. Poster abstracts

Poster abstracts adhere to the general directions for paper abstracts. Poster presentations most often consist of undergraduate research in STS and STP, but Graduate Students preferring a poster format are welcome to apply. These presentations normally take place during a larger poster session and allow students the opportunity to converse directly about their work with peers and consortium faculty. Eligibility

Papers, panels and poster abstracts are open to students currently enrolled in a graduate or undergraduate program at any institution around the world at the time of submitting an abstract.

SUBMIT ABSTRACTS HERE Deadline January 13th, 2017, midnight EST

Conference registration here

Further information
You can email us at contact@stglobal.org

Call for Papers: SIGCIS at CHM

March 18 2017 to March 19 2017 | Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California

Deadline: December 30 2016

meetings.sigcis.org

Updated: November 10 2016

Command Lines: Software, Power, and Performance
With invited keynotes: Kavita Philip (UC Irvine) and Tom Mullaney (Stanford)

The Computer History Museum (CHM) will host a meeting of the Society for the History of Technology’s (SHOT) Special Interest Group for Computing, Information and Society (SIGCIS) at the Museum over the weekend of March 18-19, 2017.

Purpose and Theme The purpose of the meeting, Command Lines: Software, Power, and Performance, is to draw together scholars from a variety of fields that study software, including the history of computing, science and technology studies, software studies, code studies, game studies, media studies, the study of women, gender and sexuality; studies of race, ethnicity and postcoloniality; network and internet histories; and computer science and engineering. The meeting hopes to explore the connections between the creation and use of software and “power” in multiple senses, and the connection between software and conceptions of technical and cultural “performance.”

The SIGCIS organizing committee now seeks proposals for short papers (15-20 min.) to present new work at the conference. We welcome work that hinges on, links to, or reacts against the themes of the meeting. We also welcome submissions that may not connect specifically with the themes but have bearing on the larger project of SIGCIS--the study of computing and sociotechnical change. We especially encourage submissions from graduate students and early career scholars.

Deadlines and Submission Protocol Proposals for papers are due by December 30th, 2016. Decisions will be made by January 16th, 2017. Proposals should include:

a one-page abstract (maximum 400 words) addressing the paper's topic, approach, sources, and relationship to existing literatures a one-page CV

Please email your proposal to SIGCIS organizing committee by midnight (Pacific time) on December 30th to Conference Assistant kera.allen@gatech.edu. Register and follow news and details for Command Lines at meetings.sigcis.org.

Location and Logistics The meeting events will be held at CHM at 1401 North Shoreline Boulevard, Mountain View, CA 94043. During the event, attendees will have access to CHM’s most recent major exhibit on software and its implications, Make Software: Change the World!

There will be no official meeting hotel or transportation. The meeting has a $40 registration fee, waived for graduate and undergraduate students as well as independent scholars. We encourage early registration, as attendance will be limited.

SIGCIS and the Museum will be able to provide partial financial support to graduate students to present at the meeting. Please note in your proposal if you would like to be considered for a travel award.

The event is sponsored by the Computer History Museum’s Center for Software History: www.computerhistory.org/softwarehistory

This event is organized by the SIGCIS Conferences Committee: David C. Brock (dbrock@computerhistory.org) Marie Hicks (mhicks1@iit.edu) Laine Nooney (laine.nooney@gmail.com) Andrew Russell (arussell@arussell.org)

Techniques of the Corporation

May 04 2017 to May 07 2017 | University of Toronto Technoscience Research Unit

Deadline: January 13 2017

Updated: November 10 2016

Conference organization Justin Douglas, Bretton Fosbrook, Kira Lussier, Michelle Murphy

How do corporations know themselves and their world? Over the last 150 years, corporations, like universities and laboratories, have generated an abundance of knowledge-making techniques in the form of psychological tests, efficiency technologies, scenario planning, and logistical systems. As dominant forms of the last century, corporations are assembled with instruments, infrastructures, and interventions that arrange and rearrange the dynamics of capitalism. These techniques of the corporation have filtered into our daily lives, influencing everyday understandings of self, inequality, environment, and society.

Techniques of the Corporation will assemble an interdisciplinary network of established and emerging scholars whose work contributes to the critical study of the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of the 20th-century corporation. This conference aims to foster a timely conversation between Science and Technology Studies (STS) approaches and the recent histories of capitalism. We treat the corporation in the same way that historians of science and STS scholars have approached science, colonialism, and militarism as generative sites for knowledge production, value-making, and technopolitics. The conference takes as its starting place North American corporations with the understanding that corporations are multinational forms with complex transnational histories. Building from the recent history of capitalism, we attend to the entangled genealogies of corporations with slavery, exploitation, environmental destruction, colonialism, and inequality.

Hosted by the Technoscience Research Unit at the University of Toronto, this event will be an intimate multi-day conversation between established and emerging scholars in the fields of STS, history of science, and the history of capitalism. Techniques of the Corporation will be headlined by keynote speaker Joseph Dumit, and features invited talks by Dan Bouk, Elspeth Brown, Deborah Cowen, Orit Halpern, Louis Hyman, Michelle Murphy, Martha Poon, and Elise Thorburn. The conference will be an immersive experience in the Greater Toronto Area with meals and cocktails provided.

We invite emerging and established scholars in diverse fields (including business history; labour history; anthropology; geography; economic sociology; media studies; critical race studies; architecture studies; feminist and sexuality studies; environmental studies; and cultural studies) to explore the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of corporations. Our overall goal is to crystallize a new field, culminating in a field-defining publication. We welcome work on corporate practices that exceed calculative logics, such as work on social relations, affective and psychological states, and speculative futurities. In addition to traditional papers, the conference encourages creative methods to query corporate forms, including art installations, videos, interactive multimedia projects, and role-playing games. Applications for travel assistance will be arranged after acceptance.


Corporate practices, include, but are not limited to:
management. sharing economy, data management, marketing, risk management, corporate culture. planning, corporate responsibility, consulting, infrastructure, sustainability, research and development, logistics, corporate design,
intellectual property, gaming, precarity, affective labor, racial surveillance, architecture,transnational capital,
Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a CV to the conference organizers at corporatetechniques@gmail.com by 13 January 2017.

7th Annual Student Conference

March 24 2017 to March 25 2017 | Washington, DC

Deadline: January 13 2017

http://stglobal.org/

Updated: October 10 2016

STGlobal Consortium •
STGlobal is a consortium of graduate and undergraduate programs focused on exploring the worlds of science policy and science, technology and society.

The STGlobal consortium presents its annual conference in Washington DC, in the scenic academic settings of the National Academy of Sciences and American Association for the Advancement of Science. The conference is run entirely by student volunteers and aims to create an environment for the presentation of work from emerging student-scholars. We are pleased to announce that the upcoming STGlobal Conference will be held on March 24th-25th, 2017.

STGlobal’s 17th annual event continues the chronicle of a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary collegial exchange. The conference attracts hundreds of students from around the world with diverse interests in Science, Technology and Society (STS) or Science and Technology Policy (STP) each year. The independent, student-led organizing committee also awards travel funds for those that are not located around the Greater Washington DC Metropolitan Area.

STGlobal inspires and challenges graduate students to contribute to discussions at the forefront of research in STP and STS, during any stage of the research process.

The Conference allows students three avenues to present their research: as part of a proposed full panel, as a paper presentation, or as a poster.

Submissions We welcome abstracts on completed research or works-in-progress on issues relevant to science & technology policy (STP) and science, technology and society (STS). We encourage submissions that highlight creative research and methodologies (ethnography, visual studies, digital media, etc.) in areas such as health, energy, sustainability, social justice, education, space studies, innovation, public policy, ethics, and the intersections between science, technology and the humanities. The above list is in no way exhaustive of the many topics within STS & STP scholarship. Paper Abstracts

Paper abstracts should be no longer than 300 words and demonstrate your paper’s connection to themes within STS and STP. We encourage submissions that highlight creative research and methodologies that work to bring STS in conversation with areas such as (but not limited to) health, energy, sustainability, social justice, education, space studies, innovation, public policy, ethics, governance, and the many intersections between science, technology, policy, and the humanities. All papers will also be considered for poster presentations. Panels

STGlobal accepts proposals for full panel presentations. Panels are built around a unifying theme, contain a minimum of three paper abstracts, and optionally a possible discussant. A discussant is not required to submit a proposal for a panel presentation. Poster abstracts

Poster abstracts adhere to the general directions for paper abstracts. Poster presentations most often consist of undergraduate research in STS and STP, but Graduate Students preferring a poster format are welcome to apply. These presentations normally take place during a larger poster session and allow students the opportunity to converse directly about their work with peers and consortium faculty. Eligibility

Papers, panels and poster abstracts are open to students currently enrolled in a graduate or undergraduate program at any institution around the world at the time of submitting an abstract.

SUBMIT ABSTRACTS HERE: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/11SGxK9QQNgIYyIh98EXdrVKTo46fPrMYMUVG0DMMEo0/viewform?edit_requested=true
Deadline January 13th, 2017, midnight EST

Conference registration here

Further information

Visit www.stglobal.org. You can email us at contact@stglobal.org

FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON THE HISTORY OF RECENT SOCIAL SCIENCE

June 09 2017 to June 10 2017 | Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Deadline: February 03 2017

www.hisress.org

Updated: October 07 2016

This two-day conference of the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS) will bring together researchers working on the history of post-World War II social science. It will provide a forum for the latest research on the cross-disciplinary history of the post-war social sciences, including but not limited to anthropology, economics, psychology, political science, and sociology as well as related fields like area studies, communication studies, history, international relations, law and linguistics. We are especially eager to receive submissions that treat themes, topics, and events that span the history of individual disciplines.

The conference aims to build upon the recent emergence of work and conversation on cross-disciplinary themes in the postwar history of the social sciences. A number of monographs, edited collections, special journal issues, and gatherings at the École normale supérieure de Cachan, Duke University, Harvard University, the London School of Economics, New York University, the University of Toronto and elsewhere testify to a growing interest in the developments spanning the social sciences in the early, late, and post-Cold War periods. Most history of social science scholarship, however, remains focused on the 19th and early 20th centuries, and attuned to the histories of individual disciplines. Though each of the major social science fields now has a community of disciplinary historians, research explicitly concerned with cross-disciplinary topics remains comparatively rare. The purpose of the conference is to further encourage the limited but fruitful cross-disciplinary conversations of recent years.

Submissions are welcome in areas such as:

- The uptake of social science concepts and figures in wider intellectual and popular discourses - Comparative institutional histories of departments and programs - Border disputes and boundary work between disciplines as well as academic cultures - Themes and concepts developed in the history and sociology of natural and physical science, reconceptualized for the social science context - Professional and applied training programs and schools, and the quasi-disciplinary fields (like business administration) that typically housed them - The role of social science in post-colonial state-building governance - Social science adaptations to the changing media landscape - The role and prominence of disciplinary memory in a comparative context

The two-day conference, hosted by the Erasmus Institute for Public Knowledge in collaboration with the Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication and the Faculty of Social Sciences at Erasmus University Rotterdam, will be organized as a series of one-hour, single-paper sessions attended by all participants. Ample time will be set aside for intellectual exchange between presenters and attendees, as all participants are expected to read pre-circulated papers in advance. Proposals should contain no more than 1000 words, indicating the originality of the paper. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is February 3, 2017. Final notification will be given in early March 2017 after proposals have been reviewed. Completed papers will be expected by May 15, 2017.

The organizing committee consists of

Jamie Cohen-Cole (George Washington University), Bregje van Eekelen (executive organizer, Erasmus University Rotterdam), Philippe Fontaine (École normale supérieure de Cachan), and Jeff Pooley (Muhlenberg College)

All proposals and requests for information should be sent to: hisress2017@gmail.com. For more information on the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS), see the website.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Infrastructure History and the Social Sciences

May 30 2017 to June 01 2017 | NYU Paris

Deadline: September 01 2016

Updated: September 15 2016

Recent work in history, anthropology, science and technology studies, geography, resilience/sustainability and other disciplines has explored the multiple social effects of infrastructure. Studies of electric power networks, aqueducts, roads and waste disposal systems have examined not only the provision of services to urban residents, but also distributions of political power, the organization of capital, contentious claims by and about labor, and environmental and distributional inequalities. Social histories and ethnographies of public and private infrastructure have demonstrated that infrastructures reshape the lives of their users even as urban residents fight to reshape it to their own ends. This work has revealed both the material grounding of urban social relations and the social life of material infrastructure. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the History and Social Life of Urban Infrastructure seeks to extend and expand this work.

The conference will bring together humanists, social scientists, and those from other disciplines studying urban infrastructure’s past, present, and future. The symposium aims to allow examination of questions including: 1. How should we understand the role of infrastructural networks in the historical development and daily social life of cities? 2. How has the development of infrastructure shaped the expectations of urban citizenship? What happens when these expectations go unrealized? 3. How should we understand the ways in which infrastructure produces or diminishes urban space and power relations? 4. What is the relationship between infrastructure and the organization of urban political power, including issues of citizenship, governmentality, and claims of rights to the city? 5. How have the resource allocations of urban infrastructure reshaped the non-human world, both within and beyond the city? 6. How has infrastructure developed differently in cities under colonial, post-colonial, socialist, Keynesian, and neo-liberal governing regimes? 7. What is the role of urban infrastructure in shaping community and supporting resilience, and how has this role emerged and evolved over time? In order to allow comparison of methodologies for the study of infrastructure, the conference aims to include scholars employing ethnographic, quantitative, and archival approaches. To enable comparison across time and place, the organizers hope to include scholars working on cities in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. We welcome submissions examining both modern and early modern eras.

The symposium will be held at NYU Paris May 31-June 1, 2017, co-sponsored by the NYU Department of History, the Department of Technology, Culture, and Society at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, and NYU Shanghai and funded by a grant from the NYU Provost’s Global Initiatives. The conference papers and presentations will be in English. The conference will be limited to a maximum of thirty papers, limited to ten double-spaced pages. Papers will be due by April 1, 2017 and pre-circulated, with a short oral presentation by the author, followed by two commentators and discussion on the floor. Those interested in presenting should submit abstracts of no more than 250 words by September 1, 2016 and will be selected by the organizing committee. Abstracts should be sent to Krysta Battersby, Project Manager, Department of Technology, Culture and Society, NYU Tandon School of Engineering Infrastructureconference2017@nyu.edu.

Stop Making Sense: A conversation between sensory and social science about food and drink

March 10 2017 |

Deadline: October 31 2016

Updated: September 15 2016

Sensory experience as a subject of study has long been a focus of multiple disciplines; yet only recently has the sensory experience of food – how it tastes and why that matters – become fodder for serious discussion. We are seeking submissions of work for a one-day symposium on the study of the senses from an interdiscilpinary perspective hosted at The Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia, on March 10, 2017. Within food science – a natural home for inquiry into food’s sensory properties – sensory scientists have designed tools and methods to measure and interpret sensory perception.

Meanwhile, within the social sciences, a growing body of researchers, including anthropologists, sociologists, historians, and philosophers have turned their attention to determining the social, cultural, and other context that shape the operation of the senses and the meanings individuals take from sensory knowledge. However, there have been few opportunities, and few incentives, for productive dialogue among sensory researchers across these fields and disciplines, especially across the perceived chasm separating food-sensory science and the humanities and social sciences. This gathering aims to combat the status quo by encouraging productive conversation and collaboration through bringing together scholars in multiple fields concerned with the study of human sensory experience of in food and drink. We seek to provoke a discussion that unsettles the presumptions of investigators in both the sciences and the humanities, to expand the methodological approaches of researchers in both fields to better attend to the previously unconsidered or overlooked, and ultimately to enrich practices of documenting, learning about, and accessing sensory experience. On the one hand, sensory evaluation as a field of study within food science has designed tools for the measurement of sensory perception.

Through experimental protocols aimed at quantitation, sensory scientists seek to access objective sensory experiences intrinsic to food itself. In fact, much of the disciplinary expertise within sensory evaluation is dedicated to the exclusion or control of biasing factors that are thought to contaminate this true experience. This approach has become extremely powerful in sensory knowledge-making; its influence can be seen from the designed environment of the “aesthetic-industrial complex” (Shapin 2012) to the everyday proliferation of taste tests claiming to show, for example, that Pepsi is “better” than Coke or that a particular brand of olive oil is the best. Despite this success, however, sensory scientists are increasingly aware of limitations in their disciplinary foundations – physiology, psychology, and other behavioral sciences (Köster 2009) – and are looking to understand and theorize information that until now has been dismissed as biasing or contextual. On the other hand, anthropologists, sociologists, historians, and other social scientists have begun to approach the same issues being tackled by sensory scientists. These scholars seek to understand the operation of the senses and the influence of political, social, and cultural practices on sensory knowledge.

Recently, social scientists interested in the “sciences of subjectivity” (Howes 2015, Shapin 2012) have expanded their examination to the practices of sensory scientists themselves. Despite this growing area of shared interest, social scientists have largely hesitated to directly engage with sensory scientists or employ the methodologies and theories sensory scientists have developed. This has led to the production of separate bodies of knowledge and theory, with too little cross-pollination. Despite theoretical and disciplinary divides, researchers investigating the senses face similar questions and challenges. How can the content of individual, subjective sensory experience be articulated and comprehended by others? How do cultural, social, and environmental factors impinge on sensory experience, and vice versa? In studying sensory perception, what – the material, the environment, the context, the culture – ”counts”? What is the role of human interpretation – subjectivity – in the measurement of sensory experiences and attributes? Fundamentally, what is the relationship between sensory experience and context? Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Hildegarde Heymann, Distinguished Professor of Viticulture and Enology, University of California–Davis Steven Shapin, Franklin L. Ford Research Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University We are seeking papers, presentations, and other works that examine the study of the senses, on topics including but not limited to: ● Methodologies and Practices of Studying Sensory Experiences – what are discipline- specific methods of engaging with and rigorously studying sensory experience? ○ Sites of Investigation — the laboratory, the field, the archive. How do different disciplines define appropriate sources of sensory information? ○ Instruments and Technologies — how do particular technologies of data collection influence how the senses are understood and known, and how have historical conceptions of sensory knowledge shaped the design of instruments to study and measure sensation? ○ Limits — are there limits to what we can know or say about the senses? how are these limits constituted? ● Defining and Communicating about Sensory Experience ○ Epistemology – how are the senses and sensory experience defined, accessed, and understood within and across disciplines? What epistemological techniques impede inter-disciplinary communication? ○ Assumptions – What implicit and explicit assumptions are present in field-specific practices of defining, researching, and talking about sensory experience? What are the effects of those assumptions? ○ Objectivity – sensory science claims to capture and make visible the universal aspects of sensory experience; how does it accomplish its goals, and what challenges or barriers might be apparent to different disciplines? ● Designing and Making Sensory Experience ○ Labor — What labor happens in making sensory authority or expertise? Is there a viable category of “sensory labor”? ○ Language and Food Design – sensory science is already intimately engaged in the design of everyday products; how can (or should) other disciplines become involved? ○ Applied Science — how does the commercial application of sensory research shape the questions that are asked, the conclusions that are drawn? Who (or what) is “the consumer” imagined by various disciplines of sensory research? Deadline: Abstracts are due October 31, 2016.

Please submit all abstracts to foodsensory@drexel.edu. Outcomes: Conference papers will be compiled and published into an edited volume Contact: Jake Lahne, jl3542@drexel.edu Where: Philadelphia PA When: March 10, 2017 at the Chemical Heritage Foundation Registration Fee: $30, due upon paper acceptance Organized by: Jacob Lahne (Drexel University), Christy Spackman (Harvey Mudd College), Nicholas Shapiro (Chemical Heritage Foundation), Nadia Berenstein (University of Pennsylvania), Ana Maria Ulloa (New School), Ella Butler (University of Chicago), and Camille Bégin (University of Toronto Scarborough) Jointly sponsored by: Drexel University and the Chemical Heritage Foundation

Call for Papers: Experiments in Force? Science and the Apparatus of Warfare

April 05 2017 to April 09 2017 | Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, Boston, MA (USA)

Updated: September 15 2016

Recent developments in the means and techniques of warfare have raised questions anew about the spatial delimitation of the battlefield, the legal and ethical norms about killing, and the migration of military technologies to other spheres of security practice. In response, scholars from a variety of disciplines have worked to make sense of these changing geographies of war and violence through scholarship on weapons systems, algorithmic surveillance, special operations, and logistics and infrastructure. Within this work, one approach has been to explore warfare as a set of interrelated processes and has emphasized the longer genealogies and historical geographies of the technologies and materialities of these practices (Kim 2016, Gordillo 2014, Chamayou 2015, Salter 2015, 2016). Less attention, however, has been devoted to historical role of science, and particularly scientific experimentation and testing, in designing, using and managing the scope and consequences of these war technologies and practices over time (c.f. De Landa 1991, Bousquet 2009, Howell 2011, Johnson 2015). Drawing on a tradition of viewing science as a political practice (Latour 1987, Schaffer and Shapin 1985, Daston and Galison 2010), this panel will recast recent attention to the ‘apparatus’ of war – the collection of actors, objects, practices and discourses through which violent action is constituted (Gregory 2011, Bolton 2015). Focusing on the role of experimental practice in the evolution of the fields – spaces and objectives – of battle, the objective is to consider the consequences not only for means and mechanisms that become possible, but also permissible. The focus is therefore to examine the settings in which techniques and technologies are tested out and in time become standardized, such that the violence of war becomes rational, legal and ethical. We are especially interested in papers, both historical and contemporary in scope, related to (but not excluded to) the changing targets and targeting of killing, the intersection of the spaces of science and war (such as laboratories, testing grounds and military industries), the historical and recent geographies of cyberspace and cyberwarfare, the intersection between medicine and military practice, and the epistemological frameworks underpinning practices of science and warfare.

Please send abstracts (250 words) and/or questions to Katharine Kindervater (katharine.h.kindervater@dartmouth.edu) and Nisha Shah (nisha.shah@uottawa.ca) by October 1, 2016

Bolton M (2015) From Minefields to Minespace: An Archeology of the Changing Architecture of Autonomous Killing In US Army Field Manuals On Landmines, Booby Traps and IEDs. Political Geography 46: 41-53.

Bousquet A (2009) The Scientific Way of Warfare: Order and Chaos on the Battlefields of Modernity. London: Hurst Publishers.

Chamayou, G (2015) A Theory of the Drone. New York: The New Press.

Daston L and Galison P (2010) Objectivity. New York: Zone Books.

Gordillo G (2015) Rubble: The Afterlife of Destruction. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Gregory, D (2011) From a View to Kill: Drones and Late Modern War. Theory, Culture, and Society 29: 188-215.

Howell, A (2011) Madness in International Relations: Psychology, Security and the Global Governance of Mental Health. London and New York: Routledge.

Johnson, E (2015) Of Lobsters, Laboratories, and War: Animal Studies and the Temporality of More-Than-Human Encounters. Environment and Planning D 33 (2): 296-313.

Kim EJ (2016) Toward an Anthropology of Landmines: Rogue Infrastructure and Military Waste in the Korean DMZ. Cultural Anthropology 31(2): 162-187.

Salter M (ed.) Making Things International 1: Circuits and Motion. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2015.

Salter M (ed.) Making Things International 2: Catalysts and Reactions. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2016.

Rust/Resistance: Works of Recovery

June 20 2017 to June 24 2017 | Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://asle2017.clas.wayne.edu

Updated: September 15 2016

2017 Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) Biennial Conference

In Rust: The Longest War, Jonathan Waldman claims that, for those who “yield to rust, find beauty in rust, capitalize on rust, raise awareness of rust, and teach about rust, work is riddled with scams, lawsuits, turf battles, and unwelcome oversight. Explosions, collisions, arrests, threats, and insults abound.” Rust is the underside of cosmopolis. Rust belts follow industry and its corrosions; the parasitic Rust fungi are enemies of agriculture. And yet there is an irenic side to rust: it inspires contemplation, the search for beauty, and the effort to defend what is threatened. As an agent of time, rust sponsors stories of collapse-and-recovery, evolution-and-extinction, but it also questions them. Narratives of progress that see rust as the enemy are not universal. In Japanese aesthetics, for instance, sabi is the beauty of natural aging and aged materials; what is new is not as lovely as what has weathered. In a time obsessed by environmental apocalypse, rust may reveal other trajectories for cultures of recovery.

Resurget Cineribus, “It Will Rise from the Ashes,” is the motto of Detroit—our host city. Long associated with steel, car culture, and the music of Motown, Detroit is also a site of struggle for racial and environmental justice, against depopulation and “ruin porn,” and for the preservation of artistic heritage. A nexus of encounters between indigenous nations and the French fur trade, it became a locus of the Great Migration, “white flight,” and gentrification. Water-rich on the strait between Lake Huron and Lake Erie, Detroit and its neighbors struggle against corroded infrastructure and government corruption. For all those reasons, Detroit is an ideal place to confer about rust, resistance, and recovery. We invite participants to interpret the conference theme as broadly as possible and to imagine their work in terms of content and form. We particularly encourage non-traditional modes of presentation, including hybrid, performative and collaborative works; panels that minimize formal presentation in favor of engaged emergent discussion; interdisciplinary approaches; environmentally inflected readings of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, film, theatre and other media; and proposals from outside the academic humanities, including submissions from artists, writers, teachers, practitioners, activists and colleagues in the social and natural sciences.

Proposals must be submitted online at https://asle.submittable.com/submit All proposals must be submitted by December 12, 2016. We will evaluate your proposal carefully and notify you of its final status by February 15, 2017. If you are a panel organizer and would like a panel CFP posted to the ASLE website, please use the online submission form here: http://www.asle.org/panel-calls-for-papers/. Note: you must be or become a member of ASLE by the time of registration to present at the conference. Join or check your membership status at http://www.asle.org/. Read full CFP here:http://www.asle.org/wp-content/uploads/ASLE-2017-CFP.pdf

STS Underground: Investigating the Technoscientific Worlds of Mining and Subterranean Extraction

February 05 2017 to February 07 2017 | Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO

Deadline: September 15 2016

Updated: August 13 2016

A Three-Day Research Workshop

With keynote speaker Gabrielle Hecht, author of Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade (MIT Press, 2012)

This intensive three-day workshop aims to bring together interdisciplinary scholars whose work addresses technologies, practices, and forms of knowledge related to the mining of minerals, groundwater and fossil fuels. We seek papers that examine the technoscientific aspects of how questions about extraction are posed and deliberated, how extraction itself occurs, and how the consequences of such extraction are addressed.

Twelve abstracts will be selected for the workshop, and authors will circulate their papers one month in advance. We encourage participation from graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty.

The workshop will include a public keynote address, a field trip/excursion with mining and petroleum experts, and a panel discussion with invited guest scholars. We will also include informal opportunities to network with fellow participants. Participants will not present their papers. Rather, submitted papers will be workshopped in small groups with an assigned discussant.

The deadline for submitting abstracts is September 15, 2016. Please send proposals (no more than one page for a single abstract, as a word or pdf document to phadke@macalester.edu and kincha@rpi.edu). Include full contact details (email, affiliation and address for contact). Notifications and initial program details will be sent out by November 1, 2016.

The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference

September 07 2017 to September 10 2017 | Athens

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr/

Updated: May 10 2016

Borders and Technology

The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will have as its main theme the history of borders and technology. We invite papers studying the history of the relationship between national borders and transnational infrastructures, hidden technological linking and delinking that reinforced or challenged border delineations and demarcations, the relationship between borders and technologically-induced environmental crises and disasters, the virtualization of borders and the territories that they contain through the use of electronic and related technologies, geopolitics and technology, the redefinition of borders due to the use of technology (and vice versa), all the way from the production to the circulation and use of goods and commodities. One central aim is to cross-fertilize between disciplines and we therefore invite contributions from a wide variety of historical disciplines as well as from fields like Migration and Border Studies, Migration History, Mobility History, etc, especially in connection to borders and migrations from, to and within Europe.

Themes that fall under the general agenda of the Tensions of Europe network are very welcomed (e.g. transnational histories of technology, history of European infrastructures and networks, environment and technology, the democracy-technology relationship, conflicting interests and technology, technology and hidden integration, technology and culture, gender and technology, technology and ethnicity, technology and disability).

Tensions of Europe has a long tradition of fostering alternative meeting formats. We encourage proposals for non-traditional sessions with different formats and new ideas (e.g. round tables, agenda-building sessions, brainstorm sessions, break-out groups with assignments, poster discussion, film discussion, event-based sessions). As long as quality can be demonstrated, the program committee will not prioritize between formats. By quality we mean suggestions that promise constructive, stimulating and engaging discussion.

We invite scholars from all relevant fields to submit proposal to the website.
by 15 February 2017

All proposals should include a title, short abstract, the academic title and affiliation of the applicant(s) and a short bio. Please name your file with your surname. Abstracts for individual papers and posters should be no more than 300 words. For panels, we ask for a description of the theme of the panel (max 300 words) together with shorter abstracts (max 150 words) of the individual papers. If you wish to suggest a presentation of a different format, please use these word limits as guidelines. We will inform applicants by April 1st 2017 whether their contribution has been accepted. A second call for papers with information about keynote speakers will be distributed by the end of 2016. Conference website: http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr/

Welcome to Athens in September 2017!

Aristotle Tympas (Chair of the Organizing Committee)

Division of History of Science and Technology Department of Philosophy and History of Science School of Science National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

The Tensions of Europe conference is organized biennially. Tensions of Europe is an interdisciplinary community of scholars who study the shaping of Europe by paying attention to the role of technology and material culture. It welcomes fruitful interaction between historians of technology and scholars who study technology from all other fields of the humanities and the social sciences (http://www.tensionsofeurope.eu). The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will be co-organized by the Division of History of Science and Technology, Department of Philosophy and History of Science, School of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (http://www.phs.uoa.gr/hst/) and the Foundation for the History of Technology (http://www.histech.nl/www/en/), which is hosted by the Eindhoven University of Technology.

Institute for Advanced Studies

October 01 2016 to June 30 2017 | Graz, Austria

Deadline: December 31 2015

http://www.ias-sts.aau.at

Updated: November 06 2015

The IAS-STS in Graz, Austria, promotes the interdisciplinary investigation of the links and interactions between science, tech- nology and society, as well as technology assessment and research into the development and implementation of socially and

environmentally sound technologies. Broadly speaking, the IAS-STS is an institute for the enhancement of science, techno- logy and society studies. The IAS-STS invites researchers to apply for a stay between 1 October 2016 and 30 June 2017 as a

• Research Fellow (up to nine months); or, • Visiting Scholar (shorter period, e.g. a month).

The IAS-STS offers excellent research infrastructure. Close co-operation with researchers at the IFZ (Inter-University

Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture), and the Graz unit of STS (Institute of Science, Technology and Society

Studies, Klagenfurt University), guest lectures, colloquia, workshops, and conferences provide an atmosphere of creativity

and scholarly discussion. Furthermore, we can offer five grants, worth EUR 940,- per month, for long-term Research Fellows

at the IAS-STS.

The Fellowship Programme 2016-2017 is dedicated to projects investigating the following issues:

1. Gender – Technology – Environment

This area of research particularly focuses on gender and queer dimensions in science and technology. On the one hand, individual

perspectives of actors in the technological field are taken into account; on the other hand, educational, organisational, societal, envi- ronmental, and political issues (e.g. queer ecology or environmental justice) are gaining more and more relevance. Queer perspectives

on STS are of special interest, including analyses of the reproduction of sexual binaries or reproductions of marginalized/hegemonic

positions and normalizations in and through science and technologies.

2. Life Sciences/Biotechnology

Applications are sought in two thematic areas: First, following some 20 years of public debate, agricultural biotechnology continues to be a

deeply controversial issue in the EU, partly fueled by progress in science and technology innovation such as GM industrial and energy crops,

or novel breeding techniques. Research should contribute to a better understanding of the regulatory, broader policy and governance

challenges of agricultural biotechnology, and/or explore strategies to manage these challenges. Second, in recent years, social studies of

the life sciences were bound to large scale research programmes. In many countries, these funding schemes have now come to an end.

This is an opportunity to review these previous programmes via collaborative engagement with the life sciences, as well as to explore new

ways of inquiry. Applicants are encouraged to address these issues when analysing the life sciences as a social process.

3. Sustainable and Innovative Public Procurement & Ecodesign

The supply side policy “Ecodesign”, and the demand side policy “Public Procurement” are used to support the transition towards

green, socially responsible and innovative markets. Nonetheless, scientific research in these respective fields is still limited. Re- searchers investigating the following areas are encouraged to apply: The environmental impact or the innovation potential of green

public procurement and “Ecodesign”; the impact of socially responsible public procurement; the hurdles, success factors, efficacy,

and wider implications of European or national policies for sustainable and innovative public procurement and “Ecodesign”.

4. Towards Low-Carbon Energy Systems

Based on analyses of social, technological and organisational frameworks of energy use, projects should contribute to the shaping

of sustainable energy, climate and technology policies. They should focus on socio-economic aspects of energy technologies or on

strategies of environmental technology policy. They should develop measures and strategies for the promotion of renewable energy

sources; for the transition to a sustainable energy system; or, contribute to the field of sustainable construction. Regional governance,

climate policy strategies, innovation policy, participation and the role of users are important themes. In addition, the Manfred Heindler

grant is awarded to research projects concerning the increased use of renewable energies and the more efficient use of energy.

5. Sustainable Food Systems

Food security, nutrition, food quality and safety, resource scarcity, carbon foot prints and other challenges faced in urban or rural

areas are currently dominating the industrialized and globalized food systems. Research applications exploring different forms of

sustainable food systems, as well as related social practices and socioeconomic/technical processes in the production, distribution,

marketing, and consumption of food are encouraged. A particular focus lies on governance mechanisms, policies, and their (potential)

contribution to a wider transformation towards more sustainable cities, regions and societies.

Applications must be submitted to the IAS-STS by 31 December 2015.

For application forms and further information:

Please visit our website: www.ias-sts.aau.at

Institute for Advanced Studies on Science, Technology and Society (IAS-STS)

Attn. Günter Getzinger • Kopernikusgasse 9 • 8010 Graz • Austria • E-mail: ias-sts@aau.at