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The monthly deadline for inclusion in the newsletter is the 15th.

One or more Sociology of Science open-rank positions, Michigan State University

Deadline: February 25 2018

http://careers.msu.edu/cw/en-us/job/498579/professortenure-system

Updated: February 15 2018

Job no: 489875
Major Administrative Unit / College: Lyman Briggs College & Department of Sociology, College of Social Science at Michigan State University
Location: East Lansing, MI
Working/Functional Title
Assistant/Associate/Full Professor , Tenure System Faculty,

Position Summary
Lyman Briggs College (http://lbc.msu.edu/) and the Department of Sociology (http://sociology.msu.edu/) at Michigan State University invite applications for one or more open rank (assistant/associate/full professor) tenure-system academic year positions in the sociology of science, medicine, and/or technology. The position will be 75% in Lyman Briggs College (LBC) and 25% in the Department of Sociology (SOC) in the College of Social Science and may start as early as August 16, 2018.

Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Sociology or an allied discipline. LBC has an ongoing commitment to inclusion and is keen to expand our expertise in areas of the sociology of science, medicine, and/or technology related to social justice issues. Preference will be given to candidates whose research and teaching focus on one or more of the following areas: health disparities; science, technology, and/or medicine in the global South; sociology of race and ethnicity; big data; the environment; and food and agriculture. Geographic area is open, although preference will be given to candidates whose scholarship and teaching engage non-Western or global contexts.

Duties include (1) teaching three small LBC undergraduate courses annually; (2) teaching one course annually in SOC; (3) maintaining an active program of research in sociology of science, medicine, and/or technology via publication, grant activity, and research-related outreach and engagement; and (4) typical academic service in LBC and SOC, with duties in each reflecting the split appointment. Preference will be given to candidates who (a) have demonstrable records of success in peer-reviewed publication; (b) have potential for and/or evidence of external grant support for their research; (c) use evidence-based teaching methods; (d) have experience teaching sociology of science, medicine, and/or technology; and (e) promote the value of inclusion in their teaching, research, and/or service (see: http://www.inclusion.msu.edu/).

For more information about LBC, SOC, Science Studies, and Inclusiveness at MSU please see the full job ad.

Minimum Requirements
Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Sociology or an allied discipline.

Desired Qualifications
Preference will be given to candidates whose research and teaching focus on one or more of the following areas: health disparities; science, technology, and/or medicine in the global South; sociology of race and ethnicity; big data; the environment; and food and agriculture. Geographic area is open, although preference will be given to candidates whose scholarship and teaching engage non-Western or global contexts.

Preference will be given to candidates who (a) have demonstrable records of success in peer-reviewed publication; (b) have potential for and/or evidence of external grant support for their research; (c) use evidence-based teaching methods; (d) have experience teaching sociology of science, medicine, and/or technology; and (e) promote the value of inclusion in their teaching, research, and/or service (see: http://www.inclusion.msu.edu/).

Required Application Materials
Complete applications will include a C.V., teaching portfolio (see guidelines at: http://lymanbriggs.msu.edu/faculty_staff/LBC-cand-teach-portfolio-2009-6-29.pdf), a cover letter that outlines the candidate’s expertise and qualifications for the duties described above, and an article or chapter length writing sample. In addition, three letters of recommendation that together address the candidate’s research expertise and/or teaching experience must be uploaded by the recommenders to MSU’s application system; the recommendation letters will be solicited after a candidate completes and submits their application.

Special Instructions
The deadline to ensure full consideration of applications is February 25, 2018, and review of applications will continue until the position is filled. Questions regarding this position may be directed to the search committee chair, Dr. Georgina M. Montgomery, at montg165@msu.edu.

Postdoc, Department of Science and Technology Studies, University of Vienna

Deadline: April 03 2018

https://univis.univie.ac.at/ausschreibungstellensuche/flow/bew_ausschreibung-flow?_flowExecutionKey=_cD58881A1-47A8-6C8A-053C-9B

Updated: February 15 2018

The University of Vienna (15 faculties, 4 centres, about 174 fields of study, approx. 9.500 members of staff, more than 94.000 students) seeks to fill the position from 01.06.2018 of a

University Assistant (post doc) at the Department of Science and Technology Studies to 31.05.2024.

Reference number: 8392

The Department of Science and Technology Studies is part of the Faculty of Social Sciences. Science and Technology Studies is a social science field with a strong interdisciplinary orientation. It analyzes the interactions of science, technology and society and is highly research oriented. Department research focuses on knowledge and technology cultures, the relations of techno-sciences and publics and the governance of techno-sciences and society. In teaching, the department offers the English language master program 'Science-Technology-Society', as well as a number of course formats for other programs.

Duration of employment: 6 year/s

Extent of Employment: 40 hours/week
Job grading in accordance with collective bargaining agreement: §48 VwGr. B1 lit. b (postdoc) with relevant work experience determining the assignment to a particular salary grade.

Job Description:
• Independent Research in Science and Technology Studies
• Publication of research results in/with recognized international journals and book publishers
• Application for research funding at funding agencies with a competitive and internationally oriented review system
• Independent teaching of courses in Science and Technology Studies at the bachelor and master level
• Supervision or Co-Supervision of students at master level
• Contribution to the administration and management of the department

Profile:
• Completed PhD (at the time the position begins)
• Broad knowledge of the topics, theories and methods of Science and Technology Studies
• Distinct profile in Science and Technology Studies, expressed in research and publications; proximity of the research profile to the department research foci is an advantage
• Teaching experience – the candidate should be capable to offer thematically focused research seminars as well as introductory courses with a broader thematic spectrum, both at bachelor and master level
• Experiences in (co-)supervising student theses are an advantage
• Excellent proficiency in English is a must; excellent or very good proficiency in German (or readiness to acquire it) is an advantage

Ability to work in a team, organising ability, reliability and high work motivation

Required Documents:
- Letter of Motivation
- Curriculum Vitae
- Syllabus of one or two taught courses or a detailed syllabus for an introductory course in Science and Technology Studies
- Two selected papers or parts of larger publications as „proof of writing skills“
- Expose of a research project
- Two letters of reference

Applications including a letter of motivation (German or English) should be submitted via the Job Center to the University of Vienna (http://jobcenter.univie.ac.at) no later than 03.04.2018, mentioning reference number 8392.

For further information please contact Fochler, Maximilian +43-1-4277-49613.

The University pursues a non-discriminatory employment policy and values equal opportunities, as well as diversity (http://diversity.univie.ac.at/). The University lays special emphasis on increasing the number of women in senior and in academic positions. Given equal qualifications, preference will be given to female applicants.

Human Resources and Gender Equality of the University of Vienna
Reference number: 8392
E-Mail: jobcenter@univie.ac.at

Instructor of Medical Anthropology, Butler University

Deadline: February 26 2018

https://www.butler.edu/hr/faculty-openings

Updated: February 14 2018

Butler University invites applications for a full-time instructor in medical anthropology that will also contribute substantially to the university's core curriculum. The position is non-tenure track with an initial two-year contract beginning August 2018, and with the possibility of continuing appointment.

Candidates should demonstrate excellence in teaching, and a strong commitment to undergraduate education. Preference will be given to candidates who complement existing faculty expertise in the Department of History & Anthropology and who can contribute to some of Butler's interdisciplinary programs (Science, Technology and Environmental Studies, Gender Studies, International Studies, and Peace Studies). Areas of specialization within medical anthropology are open. Preference will be given to applicants with expertise in Africa, although candidates working in other geographic areas will be considered.

The teaching load is 4/4. Most teaching will be in Butler's First Year Seminar (FYS) and Global and Historical Studies (GHS) programs; within these programs instructors have latitude to choose courses and topics that utilize their expertise.

Successful candidates will enjoy teaching across disciplines and topics, and must be committed to the teaching of writing. Applicants should have PhD in hand or anticipate defending by the beginning of their appointment.

To apply, please send a letter of application, current curriculum vita, (unofficial) transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and evidence of teaching excellence electronically to Elise Edwards, search chair, at medanthrosearch@butler.edu. Review of applications will begin Feb 26, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Butler University is committed to enhancing the diversity of the study body, faculty and staff. In Addition, hiring decisions are made on the basis of an individual's qualifications, past experience, overall performance and other employment-related criteria. Butler University provides equal opportunities for employment and advancement for all individuals, regardless of age, gender, race, religion, color, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, national origin, or any other legally protected category.

Two Postdoctoral Fellowships in Global Health, Yale University

Deadline: March 16 2018

https://apply.interfolio.com/48809

Updated: February 14 2018

The multidisciplinary academic program in Global Health at Yale seeks two Postdoctoral Fellows for the 2018-2019 Academic Year, with an option of renewal for the following academic year. Each Fellow will teach two undergraduate courses (one per semester) drawing on their respective areas of expertise in Global Health. They will also pursue research with a mentor of their choosing and participate in the interdisciplinary community provided by the Global Health Justice Partnership, directed by Professors Amy Kapczynski, Alice M. Miller, and Gregg Gonsalves. Participating Yale faculty in the program include members of Sociology, Anthropology, Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies, Biomedical Engineering, Medicine, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Public Health, History of Science and Medicine, Ethnicity Race & Migration. Successful candidates will also be granted a budget to host events that contribute to interdisciplinary conversations about Global Health.

Program Description

This program, administered by the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and led by the Global Health Justice Partnership, develops the ability of Yale undergraduates to think critically and analytically about key challenges in global health today. Students balance their appreciation for biomedical and technical issues related to diseases, their treatment and prevention, with their growing understanding of the historical, social, economic and political concerns that are implicated in how health is determined and experienced in the 21st century.

Qualifications

Requirements: Ph.D. awarded between 2015 and June 15, 2018 in any field, or J.D.; demonstrated record of interdisciplinary engagement across biomedical and social sciences and humanities. Field or teaching experience in global health preferred.

Application Instructions

To apply, please submit a cover letter, Short Research Statement (1 page), CV, one writing sample (dissertation chapter or published article on which you are the primary author), 1-2 sample course syllabi, and 3 confidential letters of recommendation. Applicants are encouraged to identify potential mentors in their cover letter.

All materials should be submitted online through interfolio at http://apply.interfolio.com/48809.

For further information, contact Jackson Institute for Global Affairs Deputy Director, Larisa Satara at larisa.satara@yale and/or Co-Director of the Global Health Justice Partnership, Professor Alice M. Miller at alice.miller@yale.edu

To ensure full consideration, please submit all materials by Friday, March 16, 2018. Please be sure that your recommenders address your teaching abilities in their letters.

Equal Employment Opportunity Statement

Yale University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer. Yale values diversity among its students, staff, and faculty and strongly welcomes applications from women, persons with disabilities, protected veterans, and underrepresented minorities.

New article from Michael Mascarenhas, “White Space and Dark Matter: Prying Open the Black Box of STS”

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0162243918754672

Updated: February 14 2018

Science, Technology, & Human Values 2018, Vol. 43(2) 151-170

Postdoc in gender/youth at Peanut Lab, University of Georgia

Deadline: February 28 2018

https://www.ugajobsearch.com/postings/17481

Updated: February 08 2018

Under the recently awarded Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research (Peanut Lab), the University of Georgia is seeking candidates for a Post-Doctoral Research Associate to focus on the role of gender and youth along the peanut value chain. The candidate will be based in Athens, GA and will work as a member of the Management Entity for the Peanut Lab in the Office of Global Programs, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The position will be based in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications (ALEC).

The Peanut Lab is a five-year, $14 million USAID-funded program supporting collaborative research between US and developing country partners in four Areas of Inquiry related to peanuts: varietal improvement, value-added gains along the value chain, understanding the role of peanuts in nutrition and health, and understanding the roles of gender and youth along the peanut value chain. Gender and youth are also crosscutting considerations for all Peanut Lab projects.

The University of Georgia is seeking an expert in these areas to conduct formative desk and field research, assist in the preparation and consideration of commissioned and competitive calls for research proposals under the Peanut Lab, and assist in the training and implementation of gender sensitive research by researchers from diverse disciplines. As a member of the Peanut Lab Management Entity at UGA, the Associate will also participate in the administration, monitoring and evaluation of the project.

The fellow will report to the Peanut Lab Director, Dr. Dave Hoisington, with a departmental home in the ALEC Department. Activities will be directed by the Peanut Lab Director in consultation with the ALEC Department Head.

The position is available immediately and the initial appointment is for a minimum of two years. Continuation of the position will depend on performance of the fellow, needs by UGA and Peanut Lab, and the availability of funding.

The successful applicant should have the following minimal qualifications:
• Must hold a Ph.D. in social sciences or other relevant discipline, preferably with experience in gender and/or youth in agriculture;
• Experience in international agriculture research, especially Africa;
• Excellent team skills;
• Willingness to travel internationally; and
• Excellent written and oral communication skills.

To apply, please use the following link: https://www.ugajobsearch.com/postings/17481.

Closing date for applications is 28 February 2018 or until the position is filled.

The University of Georgia is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applicants regardless of gender or ethnic background. Effective January 1, 2008, the Board of Regents has enacted a “background check” policy for new hires in the system as a condition of employment. This policy can be found at: www.policies.uga.edu/FA/nodes/view/1124/Background-investigations. Upon offer of employment, candidate must complete the “Consent for a Background Investigation” form.

Research position, Innovation through Gender in Computing, University of Kassel, Germany

Deadline: February 07 2018

https://www.uni-kassel.de/intranet/aktuelles/stellenangebote/stellenausschreibung-details/tx_ukstellenausschreibung/31044.html

Updated: February 03 2018

At the University of Kassel, Germany, Faculty of Electrical Engineering/Computing, Research Center for Information System Design (ITeG), Work Group “Gender/Diversity in Informatics Systems” the following position is to be filled as soon as possible:

Research position (EG 13 TV-H), full time, fixed term for 3 years (position for academic qualification according to § 65 HHG i. V. m. § 2 Abs. 1 Satz 1 WissZeitVG; the possibility of a doctorate/PhD is given).

The position is part of the research project "INTeGER: Innovation through Gender in Computing".

Postdoctoral Fellow, Responding to Crises in Science with New Models of Practice and Organization, UCLA

Deadline: March 15 2018

https://recruit.apo.ucla.edu/apply/JPF03531

Updated: February 03 2018

The Institute for Society and Genetics (ISG) at the University of California at Los Angeles (http://www.socgen.ucla.edu), invites applications for a postdoctoral fellow position beginning July 1, 2018. The Institute for Society and Genetics, housed in the Division of Life Sciences at UCLA, is an interdisciplinary research and teaching unit focused on issues at the intersection of biology and society. The successful candidate will work with Drs. Aaron Panofsky and Christopher Kelty on an NSF funded project (Grant # 1734683) about the dynamics and implications of recent projects, organizations, and reforms seeking to improve the robustness and reliability of biomedical and behavioral science by tracing examples of contemporary controversies surrounding, for example, the reproducibility crisis, post-publication peer review, “predatory” publishing. The postdoctoral fellow will support the PIs by conducting interviews and participant observation, collection and management of textual materials, the management of student researchers, data analysis, and write up of results.

Applicants with experience and interest in the fields of sociology and anthropology of science and science studies as well as skills in qualitative methodologies, literacy with quantitative methods, as well as strong organizational and interpersonal skills are invited to apply.

Applicants must have completed all Ph.D. requirements by the time of appointment, or have received their degree in the last five years. Certification of completion of Ph.D. degree requirements must be in hand at the time of the appointment start. This is a one-year appointment renewable for up to three years pending positive review. The pay scale follows NIH guidelines, (https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-17-003.html). The position includes health insurance plus a $1500 stipend for conference fees, travel, research equipment/supplies, and other approved research-related expenses.

Applicants are requested to submit a letter of application, which includes an explanation of the candidate’s research experience and interest in the topic, a curriculum vitae, a writing sample (an article or chapter), and the names and contact of three references. Please submit all application materials online via UCLA’s Academic Recruit Online at the following URL: https://recruit.apo.ucla.edu/apply/JPF03531. Review of materials will begin on March 15, 2018, and will close on April 15, 2018. Any questions about the position or the application process may be addressed to Aaron Panofsky (apanofsky@ucla.edu) or Christopher Kelty (ckelty@ucla.edu).

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status. For the complete University of California nondiscrimination and affirmative action policy, see: UC Nondiscrimination & Affirmative Action Policy (http://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4000376/NondiscrimAffirmAct).

Project Manager, Tisch College, Tufts University

http://www.Click2apply.net/q5282gndw9kzcpzv

Updated: January 26 2018

This is limited term position ending June 30, 2019.

The Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life prepares Tufts students to become active citizens and community leaders. As the only university-wide college of its kind, its mission is to engage Tufts students in meaningful community building, public service experiences, and transformational learning. It conducts groundbreaking research on young people’s civic and political participation, and forges innovative community partnerships. Tisch College is a national leader in civic education, whose model and research are setting the standard for higher education’s role in civic engagement.

Science, Technology, and Society (STS) is an interdisciplinary program in the College of Arts & Sciences at Tufts University. STS examines science and technology in their social and political context. The program has over 40 faculty affiliates from across the schools and departments of Tufts University and offers a major and minor.

This position will be split between several functions. One part of the job is to serve as Program Manager for the Science, Technology, and Society program, including long-range strategic program planning; budget, salaries, and reimbursements; event programming and planning (including lecture series); public outreach/marketing/communications; student services/outreach/activities; and program assessment. A second component is to serve as Project Manager for the Metric Geometry and Gerrymandering Group based at Tisch College of Civic Life, including seeking grant support; media strategy and coordination; conference organization and planning; managing publications. Finally, the position will entail management of grant-funded activities including website design; outreach; conference organization and planning; professional communication; study coordination (including IRBs). All functions will be carried out in collaboration with the Director and Principal Investigators.

Qualifications

Basic Requirements:
Master’s degree in related discipline and 3-5 years of program or project management experience or PhD in related discipline.
Preferred Qualifications:
Social media communications.
Database management.
IRB process.
Event organizing and planning.
Grant writing.
Website design.
STEM outreach.

An employee in this position must complete all appropriate background checks at the time of hire, promotion, or transfer. Equal Opportunity Employer – minority/females/veterans/disability/sexual orientation/gender identity.

New Book from Remedios and Dusek: Knowing Humanity in Social World:The Path of Steve Fuller’s Social Epistemology (Palgrave, 2018)

https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137374899

Updated: January 25 2018

This book examines Fuller’s pioneering vision of social epistemology. It focuses specifically on his work post-2000, which is founded in the changing conception of humanity and project into a ‘post-‘ or ‘trans-‘ human future. Chapters treat especially Fuller’s provocative response to the changing boundary conditions of the knower due to anticipated changes in humanity coming from the nanosciences, neuroscience, synthetic biology and computer technology and end on an interview with Fuller himself.

While Fuller’s turn in this direction has invited at least as much criticism as his earlier work, to him the result is an extended sense of the knower, or ‘humanity 2.0’, which Fuller himself identifies with transhumanism. The authors assess Fuller’s work on the following issues: Science and Technology Studies (STS), the university and intellectual life, neo-liberal political economy, intelligent design, Cosmism, Gnosticism, agent-oriented epistemology, proactionary vs precautionary principles and Welfare State 2.0.

CALL FOR PAPERS – Between the Local and the Global: Connection, Sharing, and Entanglement in the History of Technoscience

Deadline: February 10 2018

https://www.frombelow-stsitaliaconf.org/

Updated: January 22 2018

This track solicits contributions focused on the historical critique of diffusionist models of technoscience which represent innovations as originating in a single centre and diffusing in a one-way relationship to centres outside of the centre. Postcolonial critiques of diffusionist “centre-periphery” models inherited from the Cold War era have been highly effective in their exposure of the deeply embedded Eurocentrism of prevailing historical narratives in which social, cultural, and political formations are depicted as one-way relationships of “sending” colonisers and “receiving” colonial subjects. Additionally, these critiques have generated other lines of critique which feature what have variously been called “connected,” “shared,” and “entangled” approaches to history that stress networked relations and processes of mutual influencing in establishing innovation relationships. These lines of inquiry permit a foretaste of what can be achieved by untangling and reconnecting local histories of technoscience in ways that throw highlight, on the one hand, on unique schemes of local development according to the distinctive needs of local populations and, on the other, how local infrastructures are reworked and redeployed from below to accommodate global processes of technoscientific innovation. The convenors seek to open up and develop these lines of inquiry with a track that explores the role of bottom-up innovation processes and departs from the deeply rooted territorial approaches of the past.

Contributions could include (but are not limited to) studies of “connected,” “shared,” and “entangled” relations of technoscience which:

- have occurred between colonial powers and (now) independent former colonies

- have occurred under (pre- or post-1989) first-second-third world interactions

- have occurred in the course of development (i.e., developing/developed nations)

- have occurred as a result of collaborations in international and/or supranational technoscientific projects (e.g., Human Genome Projects, LIGO Scientific Collaboration, CERN and SESAME, Millennium Seed Bank Partnership).

Submissions: To submit a paper for this track, we require an abstract of roughly 300 words submitted as .docx, .doc, or .pdf.

Please send submission directly to the co-convenors: William Leeming, OCAD University, bleeming@faculty.ocadu.ca and Ana Barahona, National Autonomous University of Mexico, ana.barahona@ciencias.unam.mx

PhD DAYS INGENIO 2018: Science, Technology and Innovation: New challenges and practices

February 03 2018 to February 05 2018 | Valencia, Spain

Deadline: February 23 2018

http://www.ingenio.upv.es/en/teams/phd-students/ingenio-phd-days-2018

Updated: January 22 2018

INGENIO is pleased to announce the 2018 PhD Days, a three-day conference organized by doctoral students for doctoral students. The event seeks to provide early career researchers the opportunity to develop and refine research capabilities, presentation and communication skills as well as building career networks.

The main themes of interest of the 2018 PhD Days are aligned with the European Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (Horizon 2020), with a particular emphasis on societal concerns in areas such as environmental sustainability, innovative and reflective societies, climate action, food security, inequality and social well-being. The Early Career conference will be especially receptive to contributions from a variety of disciplines including - but not limited to - economics, sociology, political science, management, scientometrics, geography, as well as their cross-fertilization. Topics

The conference will be built around five main lines. 1. Science Communication & Dissemination of Research

This theme focuses on the permeability between science and society, in particular the mechanisms that encourage the participation of informed citizens in the public debate. Potential contributions may include, among other: measurement of trust, understanding and engagement in science, technology & innovation; impact of public outreach activities; commitment of scientists and institutions to the dissemination of research; the perception of science and the values of scientific inquiry. 2. Innovation: sources, effects and implementation

There is growing demand for greater connection between the study of Science, Technology and Innovation and the application of scientific insights to societal challenges. This theme seeks to attract contributions from a variety of perspectives (i.e. Economics, Management, Sociology, et cetera) and devoted to a wide range of societal issues including, but not limited to, employment; inequality; climate change; local economic development; migration; causes and consequence of the emerge and decline of industrial sectors. 3. Science, Open Science and evaluation policies

We welcome contributions that analyze the alignment between science performance, evaluation policies and science-governing practices. Potential contributions to this theme should address, but are not limited to: managing and evaluating science; the effects of scientific evaluation on the scientific community; methods and indicators for evaluation of research; Open Science policies and practices and their implications for evaluation; mechanisms to promote Open Science. 4. Practices and strategies for engagement and collaboration for sustainability

This theme focuses on the use of tools, mechanisms and practices that promote innovation engagement and collaboration toward environmental sustainability. We seek contributions focusing on, among other things: new market strategies for more integrative and sustainable business models; coordination and cooperation among firms, local communities, scientific and technical sectors as well as policy makers for planning sustainable development; promotion of inter-organizational and inter-institutional conditions to incentivize emerging innovation; development and orchestration of human resources within and between organizations. 5. Social innovation to promote transformative transitions

This theme focuses on social innovations promoting transformative transitions across a broad spectrum of sectors (i.e. energy, food, housing). We invite contributions that examine the politics of transition with special interest on innovations promoting citizen engagement, equity and reducing inequalities and vulnerabilities. Potential themes include, but are not limited to: case studies of grassroots innovations emerging from the civil society; reflections on the connections, commonalities and shared features of transitions in different sectors; and the linkage between social justice theories (mainly energy justice and food justice) and social innovation and socio-technical transition. Paper submission

Potential participants are invited to submit a short bio (about 150 words) and an extended abstract (up to 1.500 words) no later than 23th February 2018.

Abstracts will be in English and should include: (i) main objectives of research; (ii) research questions; (iii) methodology; (iv) key findings or expected results. Applicants must select one of the research lines indicated above.

Australasian STS Graduate Network (AusSTS)

January 31 2018 | Melbourne

Deadline: January 25 2018

https://blogs.deakin.edu.au/science-and-society-network/graduate-network/

Updated: January 22 2018

Announcing the launch of the a network of early career researchers and postgraduate students in social studies of science and technology. The network was established in late 2017 by a small group of STS PhDs and ECRs in Melbourne, Australia.

We host social, professional and academic events to support ECRs and PhDs to create a community in STS across Australia.

To join AusSTS and receive updates about events and activities signup at our Google group ‘Australasian STS Grad Network (AusSTS)’ and follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/gradSTSau.

If you would like to get more actively involved (eg: hosting an event or activity or presenting) please contact us at AuGradSTSnetwork@gmail.com and let us know how we can assist.

Our official launch will be held on Wednesday 31st of January. Event details: Australasian STS graduate network (AusSTS) official launch and inaugural meeting Date: Wednesday 31st January, 2018 4pm - 6pm Venue: Deakin Downtown – Level 12 Tower 2 - 727 Collins Street Melbourne Cost: Free, please register with eventbrite no later than January 25.

Light refreshments will be served following official launch and talks.

About the Speakers: Emma Kowal is Professor of Anthropology at the Alfred Deakin Institute and Convener of the Science and Society Network at Deakin University. She is a cultural and historical anthropologist who previously worked as a medical doctor and public health researcher in Indigenous health. Much of her work is at the intersection of science and technology studies, postcolonial studies and indigenous studies. Her publications include the monograph Trapped in the Gap: Doing Good in Indigenous Australia and the collection (co-edited with Joanna Radin) Cryopolitics: Frozen Life in a Melting World. Her current book project is entitled Haunting Biology: Science and Indigeneity in Australia.

Professor Helen Verran scholarly life began in the natural sciences. She wrote Science and an African Logic (Univ of Chicago Press, 2001) after wrestling with philosophical questions around science and numbers when working in teacher education in Nigeria. Between late 1980s and 2012 she taught the History and Philosophy of Science at University of Melbourne. During that time, her research focus involved working with Yolngu Aboriginal Australians in Arnhem Land as they endeavoured to engage with science and scientists. She is currently working at the Northern Institute, interested in policy and politics in the areas of environmentalism and indigeneity. Her approach to analysis in these areas can be understood as a form of empirical philosophy.

For any other information, please contact AuGradSTSnetwork@gmail.com or visit us at Deakin SSN.

The Nuclear Origins of the Anthropocene

August 12 2018 to August 15 2018 | Prague, Czech Republic

Deadline: January 30 2018

http://www.eisapec18.org

Updated: January 22 2018

For this year's Pan-European Conference on International Relations Abstracts of 200 words should be sent to rmu@diis.dk.
*Rens van Munster (rmu@diis.dk )*
At a time when human disturbances threaten the liveability of the planet, the concept of the Anthropocene has captured the popular and scholarly imagination with plots of mass extinction, ecocide and ecological collapse. Geologists have yet to formally agree on the start date of the Anthropocene, but the early Cold War period of fervent atmospheric nuclear testing is increasingly mentioned as the prime candidate. Yet, despite the centrality of nuclear weapons for the discipline of IR, surprisingly few IR scholars have paid systematic attention to the multiple and often paradoxical links between the nuclear age and the age of the Anthropocene. This panel seeks to remedy this situation and calls for papers that explicitly explore *the Anthropocene as the radioactive afterlife of the Cold War*. To what extent do radioactive ecologies of the Cold War foreshadow the emerging global condition of the Anthropocene? What role does visual iconography of the Cold War play in current visualizations of the Anthropocene? In what ways have Cold War science and technology (satellite technology, nuclear weapons science, Earth science) produced (our understanding) of the Anthropocene? What does it mean for our understanding of security and survival to view the Anthropocene as the environmental, social and technological fallout of the Cold War? The panel welcomes any paper that engages and gauges the historical, theoretical and empirical connections between the Cold War and the Anthropocene.

The 7th STS Italia Conference

June 14 2018 to June 16 2018 | University of Padova, Italy

Deadline: February 10 2018

https://www.frombelow-stsitaliaconf.org/call-for-abstracts

Updated: January 22 2018

The conference will be an opportunity to present empirical and theoretical work from a variety of disciplines and fields: sociology, anthropology, design, economics, history, law, philosophy, psychology and semiotics. The focal theme of the 7th STS Italia Conference will be Technoscience from Below. By focusing on Technoscience from Below, the 7th STS Italia Conference will offer the opportunity to explore alternative co-productive paths of science, technology, and innovation. The conference will be articulated in 26 tracks (clustered in five main thematic streams), focusing on several different topics, including: environmental issues, biomedical settings, communication and digital media, responsible research and innovation, design, infrastructures and co-shaping of science and technology at large.

Abstracts (written in English, or in Italian in case of tracks in double language) should be submitted by February, 10 to the conference email address (7thstsitaliaconf@gmail.com) and to the emails of convenors' selected track. Track Convenor(s) will be responsible for reviewing, accepting/rejecting and organising submissions into their track.

THE FINAL PROGRAM OF THE CONFERENCE WILL BE RELEASED BY MAY 20, 2018.

Submission (to the conference email address <7thstsitaliaconf@gmail.com> and to the emails of convenors' selected track) should include:


1. Author’s name and surname, institution and email address
2. Title
3. Abstract’s text (no more than 300 word all included)


THEMATIC STREAMS


Participation, citizen engagement and democracy from below
The shaping of biomedicine, medical expertise and healthcare from below

Innovation, design and standardization from below

Imaginaries, knowledge and networks from below

Including and connecting from below

18th annual Society for History and Philosophy of Science Conference

June 10 2018 | Van Leer Jerusalem Institute.

Deadline: March 28 2018

Updated: January 22 2018

The aim of the conference Is to bring together under one roof researchers from the great variety of disciplines that have turned their attention to the study of science, medicine, and technology: history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology. psychology, political science, economics, geography, literature, education, medicine, natural and life sciences, and more.

We invite proposals for individual lectures (20 minutes in length) and for full sessions (90 minutes in length, comprising three or four lectures). Every proposal for a reflective investigation of any aspect of science, medicine, or technology, past or present, will be considered. We are especially interested in receiving proposals concerning science, medicine, and technology in Israel.

Submission guidelines: For individual lectures, please submit a 250-400 word abstract describing briefly the subject of your research, your methods, and your principal findings. For session proposals, please submit (1) a 250-400 description of the panel, (2) the names, Institutional affiliations, and contact information for each of the proposed presenters, and (3) a 250-400 word abstract for each lecture in the session, as described above.

Proposals should be submitted as a Word or Open Office document and sent as an email attachment to isrhps@gmail.com. Preference will be given to sessions that include researchers from at least two different academic Institutions.

Submission deadline: February 28, 2018.

For additional information or assistance regarding topics for individual lectures or sessions, please write to isrhps@gmail.com.

Conference committee (In alphabetical order): Anat Ben David, Hagai Boas, Nadav Davidovltch, Noah Efron, Shaul Katzir, Nurit Kirsh, Agate Krauss, David Rier, Orly Shenker.

The First Open Congress of Russian Society for History and Philosophy of Science (RSHPS)

September 14 2018 to September 16 2018 | Moscow, Russia

Deadline: March 01 2018

http://rshps.org/?lang=en

Updated: January 22 2018

The Organizing Committee cordially invites historians, philosophers and all scientists interested in HPS from all over the world to participate. The Congress will be organized by the Institute of Philosophy, Russian Academy of Sciences, in cooperation with Lomonosov Moscow State University and other leading educational and academic institutions.

The aims of the Congress include a promotion of new agendas in HPS, discussing of structural shifts in this field of research and making certain decisions in RSHPS. The Congress covers all areas of HPS, which are present today in Russia, including new emerging areas, which only begin to develop in this country. For more information about the RSHPS and the Congress you can refer to our official website. The working languages of the Congress are Russian and English. KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Harry Collins, Distinguished Research Professor, the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Wales, UK John Duprė, the director of the ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society and professor of philosophy at the University of Exeter, UK Steve Fuller, Auguste Comte Chair in Social Epistemology at the Department of sociology at University of Warwick, UK Vladislav Lektorsky, Prof. Dr., Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia Elisabeth Lloyd, the Arnold and Maxine Tanis Chair of History and Philosophy of Science, Professor of Biology, and Adjunct Professor of Philosophy at Indiana University, USA Trevor Pinch, Goldwin Smith Professor of Science & Technology Studies, Cornell University, USA Vjacheslav Stepin, Prof. Dr., Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

Submissions Potential contributors are asked to send abstracts up to 10 000 character or 1500 words by March 1, 2018 to congress18 (at) rshps (dot) org as attachments in RTF or DOC format. In the beginning of the abstract please specify your full name, affiliation, email and the name of section or round table where you prefer to present your paper. Then follow a short abstract (up to 100 words) and the main body of your submission. Please use automatic endnotes rather than footnotes. The list of accepted abstracts will be published on the Congress’ site by April 1, 2018. Accepted abstracts will be published in the Congress Proceedings in August 2018. The Organizing Committee reserve the right to offer a contributor to deliver a plenary or section talk, participate in a round table or make a poster presentation. Program Scientific sessions will be held on September 14-15. Plenary talks in the morning will be 45 minutes long, including a 10 minute question-answer session. 11 sections and 5 round tables will be held parallel in the afternoon after plenary session. 1 invited lecture (1 hour long including 15 minute question-answer session) will take place in the evening. The open annual conference of RSHPS will be held on September 16. Sections 1. History and Philosophy of Mathematics (organizers: V.A. Bazhanov, A.N. Kritchevetz, E.A. Zaytzev) 2. Philosophical Issues of Natural Sciences (D.A. Bayuk, A.Yu. Sevalnikov, E.A. Zatzeva-Baum) 3. Philosophical Problems of Cognitive Science (V.A. Lektorsky) 4. Philosophical Logic (V.I. Markin) 5. Logic and Rhetoric of Science (I.N. Griftzova, G.V. Sorina) 6. Ethics of Science (P.D. Tischenko) 7. History and Philosophy of Humanities (M.S. Kisselyova, I.E. Sirotkina) 8. History of Philosophy of Psychology (A.G. Asmolov, A.N. Mazilov, V.F. Petrenko) 9. Philosophical Issues of Technoscience (V.I. Arshinov, V.G. Budanov) 10. History of Philosophy of Science (I.T. Kasavin, T.D. Sokolova) 11. Philosophical Issues of Computer Science and Information Technologies (P.N. Baryshnikov, A.V. Rodin) Round Tables: 1. Communication in Science (E.O. Trufanova and A.F. Yakovleva) 2. Philosophical Problems of Normative Sciences (I.D. Nevvazhai) 3. Convergence of natural sciences, social sciences and humanities (T.G. Leshkevich) 4. Alchemy as a cultural phenomenon 5. Cultural and Philosophical Foundations of Modern Science (D.N. Drozdova) Conference fee 50 Euro (normal) and 25 Euro (for students) could be paid by the conference registration. This includes the distribution of the conference proceedings, organization of coffee breaks & welcoming party, Russian visa support and a competence advice in terms of the hotel accommodation.

New Book: Fractivism by Sara Ann Wylie (Duke University Press, 2018)

https://www.dukeupress.edu/fractivism

Updated: January 21 2018

Duke University Press is pleased to announce the publication of Fractivism: Corporate Bodies and Chemical Bonds by Sara Ann Wylie (Northeastern University).

Fractivism traces the history of fracking in the United States and how scientists, nonprofits, landowners, and everyday people are coming together to hold the fossil fuel industry accountable through the creation of digital platforms and databases that document fracking's devastating environmental and human health impacts.

Postdoctoral Researcher in ethics of data protection, privacy-preserving technologies, ETH Zurich

Deadline: February 01 2018

https://apply.refline.ch/845721/5927/pub/1/index.html

Updated: January 09 2018

The Health Ethics and Policy Lab is a multidisciplinary research group established in 2017 at the Department of Health Sciences and Technology (D-HEST) at ETH Zurich. Our current work focuses on the ethical, legal, societal and policy implications of precision medicine, biotechnology and digital health. We are looking for an outstanding postdoctoral researcher to work with Prof. Vayena and her team on ethical and regulatory challenges of data privacy and security in precision medicine.

Postdoctoral Researcher working on the ethics of data protection and privacy-preserving technologies in precision medicine (100%)

As a member of the Health Ethics and Policy Lab, the selected candidate will be in charge of activities related to a newly awarded PHRT research project on Data Protection in Personalized Health (https://www.sfa-phrt.ch/approved). In this capacity, the postdoctoral researcher will be in charge or contribute to study design, qualitative and quantitative data collection, literature reviews, policy analyses and normative analyses. Moreover he/she will take the lead or collaborate in the publication of research results. The selected candidate is also expected to help in the dissemination of research activities by collaborating to the organization of academic events, by participating in scientific conferences, and by curating content for blogs and social media platforms. The duration of the position is 2 years with possibility of extension and the preferred starting date is April 1, 2018 (or later).
The position is suited to candidates who have recently completed a doctorate or a post-doctoral appointment in social sciences (e.g. bioethics, law, sociology, anthropology, science and technology studies and related fields). We are looking for candidates with a strong interest for the ethical, legal and social implications of technology; previous experience in areas such as personalized medicine, genomics or research ethics, privacy (appreciated); demonstrated experience with social science methods (e.g. literature review, qualitative research); a record of publications in peer-reviewed journals; excellent writing and oral presentation skills in English; ability to work in team and to develop respectful working relations with colleagues.

We look forward to receiving your online application including a cover letter showing why you think you are a good match for this position (maximum one page) until February 1, 2018. Short-listed candidates will be invited for face-to-face interviews taking place in Zurich between February 15 and March 5, 2018. Please note that we exclusively accept applications submitted through our online application portal. Applications via email or postal services will not be considered.

For further information about the Chair of Bioethics please visit our website http://www.bioethics.ethz.ch/. Questions regarding the position should be directed to Christian Rossi at crossi[at]ethz.ch (no applications).

Postdoctoral Researcher in ethics of data governance, citizen participation in precis med ETH Zurich

Deadline: February 01 2018

https://apply.refline.ch/845721/5926/pub/1/index.html

Updated: January 09 2018

he Health Ethics and Policy Lab is a multidisciplinary research group established in 2017 at the Department of Health Sciences and Technology (D-HEST) at ETH Zurich. Our current work focuses on the ethical, legal, societal and policy implications of precision medicine, biotechnology and digital health. We are looking for an outstanding postdoctoral researcher to work with Prof. Vayena and her team on ethical issues in participatory data governance for precision medicine.

Postdoctoral researcher working on the ethics of data governance and citizen participation in precision medicine (100%)

As a member of the Health Ethics and Policy Lab, the selected candidate will be in charge of activities related to a newly awarded PHRT research project on the development of novel models to foster participatory data governance in precision medicine (https://www.sfa-phrt.ch/approved). In this capacity, the postdoctoral researcher will be in charge or contribute to study design, qualitative and quantitative data collection, literature reviews, policy analyses and normative analyses. Moreover he/she will take the lead or collaborate in the publication of research results. The selected candidate is also expected to help in the dissemination of research activities by collaborating to the organization of academic events, by taking part in scientific conferences, and by curating content for blogs and social media platforms. The duration of the position is 2 years with possibility of extension and the preferred starting date is April 1, 2018 (or later).

The position is suited to candidates who have recently completed a doctorate or a post-doctoral appointment in social sciences (e.g. bioethics, law, sociology, anthropology, science and technology studies and related fields). We are looking for candidates with a strong interest for the ethical, legal and social implications of biomedicine; previous experience in areas such as personalized medicine, genomics or research ethics (appreciated); demonstrated experience with social science methods (e.g. literature review, qualitative research); a record of publications in peer-reviewed journals; excellent writing and oral presentation skills in English; ability to work in team and to develop respectful working relations with colleagues.

We look forward to receiving your online application including a cover letter showing why you think you are a good match for this position (maximum one page) until February 1, 2018. Short-listed candidates will be invited for face-to-face interviews taking place in Zurich between February 15 and March 5, 2018. Please note that we exclusively accept applications submitted through our online application portal. Applications via email or postal services will not be considered.

For further information about the Chair of Bioethics please visit our website http://www.bioethics.ethz.ch/. Questions regarding the position should be directed to Christian Rossi at crossi[at]ethz.ch (no applications).

Mary Frank Fox elected to AAAS Committee on Nominations

Updated: January 09 2018

Mary Frank Fox (School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology) has been elected to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Committee on Nominations that determines the candidate slate for the AAAS Annual Election for President-elect, the Board of Directors, and the Committee on Council Affairs. Her term begins in 2018.

New Title: The Anthem Companion to Karl Mannheim (Anthem, 2017)

http://www.anthempress.com/the-anthem-companion-to-karl-mannheim

Updated: January 03 2018

The Hungarian-born Karl Mannheim became recognized as a pathbreaking sociologist in Germany when he published 'Ideologie und Utopie' (1929) and in the English-speaking world upon publication of 'Ideology and Utopia' (1936), a book in which he explored the possibilities of an approach to political thought by way of sociology of knowledge. Eighty years later, and viewed from varied substance-rich perspectives worldwide, the many facets of Mannheim’s original work are examined in their bearing on numerous other questions in political theory, cultural studies and social analysis. 'The Anthem Companion to Karl Mannheim' is an international collection of original articles on the classical sociologist and documents the current revitalization of the reception of this social thinker. Using “learning from Mannheim” as their motif, the chapters in this volume favor fresh negotiations with his works, including the writings published posthumously in recent decades.

About the Author

David Kettler is research professor at Bard College, US, and professor emeritus at Trent University, Canada. His publications include five coauthored books on Karl Mannheim. Volker Meja is professor emeritus at Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.

About Anthem Press

Anthem Press is a leading independent publisher of innovative academic research, educational material and reference works in established and emerging fields.

CFP for the Forum of the Philosophy of Engineering and Technology

May 30 2018 to June 01 2018 | University of Maryland, College Park

Deadline: January 14 2018

http://www.philosophyengineering.com/

Updated: December 18 2017

The 2018 Forum on Philosophy, Engineering and Technology (fPET) welcomes abstract submissions. The mission of fPET is to encourage reflection on engineering, engineers, and technology; and to build bridges between existing organizations of philosophers, engineers and scholars in related fields.

There will be three fPET 2018 keynote speakers, with the only currently confirmed speaker being:

William Wimsatt (University of Minnesota, author of Re-Engineering Philosophy)

Abstracts (500 words max) are invited for submission in three tracks:

Track 1: Philosophy of engineering and technology,
Track 2: Ethics relating to engineering and technology, and
Track 3: Interdisciplinary reflections on engineering practice.

In the interdisciplinary Track 3, fPET 2018 welcomes submissions such as a) the implications of philosophy of engineering for policy in Washington, DC and elsewhere; b) maintenance in engineering, including ethical and epistemological issues; c) modularity in engineering systems and design; and d) how science fiction and art can inform our understanding of engineering.

All submissions will be peer-reviewed by the program committee listed below. Abstracts accepted for presentation will be published on the fPET website. Podium presentations will be 30 minutes, including Q&A. Following the conference, we expect to invite selected papers for publication in an edited volume.

Submit abstracts electronically at https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=fpet2018 by January 14, 2018. 500 word maximum abstract length excludes citations. Notification of acceptances will be sent by March 15, 2018.

HOPOS 2018 Call for Submissions

July 09 2018 to July 12 2018 | Groningen, The Netherlands

Deadline: December 01 2017

http://www.hopos2018.nl/

Updated: December 18 2017

HOPOS: The International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science will hold its twelfth international congress. The Society hereby requests proposals for papers and for symposia to be presented at the meeting. HOPOS is devoted to promoting research on the history of the philosophy of science. We construe this subject broadly, to include topics in the history of related disciplines and in all historical periods, studied through diverse methodologies. In order to encourage scholarly exchange across the temporal reach of HOPOS, the program committee especially encourages submissions that take up philosophical themes that cross time periods. *SUBMISSION DEADLINE: December 1, 2017* To submit a proposal for a paper or symposium, please visit the conference website: http://www.hopos2018.nl/ For details about the mentoring program for junior scholars, please see: http://www.hopos2018.nl/programme/hopos-mentoring-program/

Technoscience from Below

June 14 2018 to June 16 2018 | University of Padova, Italy

Deadline: November 15 2017

http://www.stsitalia.org/?p=1856&lang=en

Updated: December 18 2017

The 7th STS Italia Conference will be hosted at the University of Padova, Italy, June 14 through 16, 2018, by the Italian Society of Science and Technology Studies, in collaboration with the FISPPA Department and the University of Padova.

The conference will be an opportunity to present empirical and theoretical work from a variety of disciplines and fields: sociology, anthropology, design, economics, history, law, philosophy, psychology and semiotics. This work will focus on diverse aspects of the social study of science, technology, and innovation.

The focal theme of the 7th STS Italia Conference will be Technoscience from Below. The conference will be organized around multiple thematic tracks, which will be selected by the scientific committee based on the outcome of this call for tracks, expiring November 15, 2017.

By focusing on Technoscience from Below, the 7th STS Italia Conference will offer the opportunity to explore alternative co-productive paths of science, technology, and innovation. Contemporary research on alternative paths to innovation show that the production of science and technology is blooming in a variety of alternative domains. These cover previously unexpected geographical contexts and organizational settings, involving a wide array of unconventional actors. Some examples of emerging processes of co-production coming from unpredicted places and actors are DIY practices in biomedicine, technoscientific research from the periphery, marginalised contexts of a globalised world, scattered groups of hackers, and lively local communities active in environmental sensing through crowd data generation. These processes are carried out by a combination of public authorities and grassroots participation of citizens and other non-institutional actors (i.e., environmental citizen groups, hackerspaces, and independent groups of patients), as well as with other economic and social actors. Moreover, these collective and distributed processes, in which humans and non-humans interact, also question the political role of technoscience and innovation institutions. They place themselves as alternative or even antagonistic points of view around issues of access to innovation, particularly its transparency and democratization. Technoscience from Below cannot be explained as the result of independent choices by isolated groups, whether designers, producers, or users; rather, it emerges as the collective performance of new ways of engagement in research and innovation governance. For these reasons, the exploration of alternative patterns of technoscientific innovation represents an increasingly important task for the STS community and other related fields.

Based on this broad reflection, the 7th Edition of the STS Italia conference sets out with a call for tracks intended to select topics of focus for the conference’s sessions, which will then form the basis of the call for abstracts. Each track must be presented and managed by one or more convenors. Convenors will be responsible for formulating the call for abstracts, selecting abstracts, and organizing the track.

Track proposals should be submitted via e-mail to the organizing committee (7thstsitaliaconf@gmail.com) by November 15, 2017. Proposals may cover all topics related to the social study of innovation processes, technology, and science. Proposals on the following topics are especially welcome:

• Processes and practices of technological innovation

• Forms of participation and engagement with technoscience

• Design practices inside and outside official research institutions

• Postcolonial technoscience: science and technology in non-Western countries

• The use and deployment of technology, technical devices, and artefacts

• The relationship among innovation, ethics, and responsibility

• Regulation and governance of innovation

• Communication, media, and digital technologies

• Alternative medical practices and healthcare environments

• The public shaping of medical research

• Hackerspaces, makerspaces, and DIY centres

• The relationship among innovation, market, and macro-economic in subaltern contexts

• Grassroots innovations for sustainable development

• Methodologies for studying technoscientific processes from below

• Alternative strategies for communicating science and technology

• Research policies and knowledge production in non-institutional loci

• Groups, organizations, and places of innovation

• The relationship between knowledge and techniques in material and digital products

• The body, gender, and technoscientific performance

• Critical reflection on the gender-technology relationship

• Expectations and promises related to innovation processes

• Critical debate on mainstream accounts of the West’s technoscientific practices


Submissions for thematic tracks should be written in English and Italian and include a short description of the proposed theme and area of interest (max. 400 words), as well as some information about the convenors (max. 50 words each, including email addresses). Convenors will be notified of track acceptance by November 30, 2017.

Convenors will independently set session topics and organize each track according to numerical constraints specified by the scientific board. Convenors who consider an abstract interesting but not suited to their thematic track will be free to redirect the abstract to the scientific board for submission to another track. If a track draws less than three abstracts, the scientific board will decide whether to run the track or merge it with another track.


IMPORTANT DATES



· November 15, 2017: Deadline of the call for tracks

· November 30, 2017: Notification of track acceptance

· December 15, 2017: Conference announced with call for abstracts

· February 15, 2018: Deadline for abstract submission

· March 15, 2018: Authors notified of abstract acceptance or rejection

· March 30, 2018: Early registration deadline

· April 30, 2018: Closing date for registration

· May 15, 2018: Publication of final conference program

· June 14-16, 2018: Conference




CONTACTS: 7thStsItaliaConf@gmail.com

Making Sense of the Underground

August 27 2018 to August 28 2018 | University of Wollongong, Australia

Deadline: February 01 2018

https://www.mines.edu/stsu/2018workshop/

Updated: December 17 2017


DEADLINE EXTENDED TO FEBRUARY 1, 2018

What does the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) have to say about the underground? Mining, subterranean exploration, burial, and other forms of underground work are rich areas of investigation for STS scholars. This workshop aims to strengthen and expand the network of researchers in STS who address the underground in their work. Our focus will be on methodology: what research methods and analytical strategies can we use to observe and make sense of human interactions with subterranean materials and places? By focusing on method, we can better understand and share the ways in which we come to know and mobilize the underground spaces and places that are so difficult to see, explore and develop.

Our workshop will be sited in Wollongong, about 1.5 hrs from Sydney, and located in the heart of what is called the “Southern Coal Fields” of New South Wales. The workshop will include opportunities to share research in progress and network with international colleagues. Activities will include a keynote address by a noted scholar, a field excursion to a coal mining region, a panel discussion with activists confronting the mining industry, and exchanges with Sydney-based scientists and engineers working in mining and other related fields.

This workshop is sponsored by the United States National Science Foundation, the University of New South Wales and the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (AUSCCER) at the University of Wollongong. It is organized by Roopali Phadke (Macalester College), Jessica Smith (Colorado School of Mines), Abby Kinchy (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) and Matthew Kearnes (U. of New South Wales).

Applications to participate should include a 200-word biographical statement and a 500-word statement that describes and reflects upon the methodological challenges and opportunities that subterranean STS entails. For example, applicants could focus on:

Research techniques for probing, seeing, and representing human interactions with the underground.
Ways of connecting with networks and partners to facilitate engaged and community based practice.
Analytical frameworks that move up and down scales of analysis.

We are particularly interested in including scholars whose work addresses public issues or involves collaboration with scientists, engineers, or members of the lay public.

Applications to participate in the workshop are due on February 1, 2018 and should be emailed to Abby Kinchy (kincha@rpi.edu). The subject line of the email should read “STSU Sydney (surname of applicant)”.

Up two twenty applications will be chosen. Travel from Sydney to Wollongong, lodging and meals will be covered by the organizers. Ten workshop participants will be selected to receive a travel stipend of $500. Priority for stipends will be given to those traveling from outside Australia, particularly graduate students and junior scholars.

The workshop is timed to precede the 2018 meetings of the Society for Social Studies of Science in Sydney. There will be a related panel (open session) for the 4S meetings titled “STS UNDERGROUND: Investigating the Technoscientific Worlds of Mining and Subterranean Extraction”. Please consider submitting a paper abstract to that session (listed as #12 under open panels on the 4S Sydney meeting website), in addition to applying to participate in this workshop. The deadline for applying for 4S Sydney open sessions is February 1, 2018.

Questions about the workshop can be directed to Abby Kinchy (kincha@rpi.edu).

NSF Smart and Connected Communities (S&CC) program solicitation

Deadline: January 30 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf18520

Updated: December 17 2017

The goal of the NSF Smart and Connected Communities (S&CC) program solicitation is to accelerate the creation of the scientific and engineering foundations that will enable smart and connected communities to bring about new levels of economic opportunity and growth, safety and security, health and wellness, and overall quality of life. This goal will be achieved through integrative research projects that pair advances in technological and social dimensions with meaningful community engagement.

It will include regular research grants ($750,000 to $3,000,000, up to 4 years). This program differs from other NSF cross-directorate research programs because it requires a collaboration with one or more physical communities (e.g., cities).

Call for Papers: DASTS Biennial Conference Theme: Engaging ‘the Data Moment’

May 24 2018 to May 25 2018 | IT University of Copenhagen

Deadline: February 01 2018

http://DASTS.dk

Updated: December 17 2017

Our contemporary moment is increasingly characterized by and through data. Imaginaries run wild; data is the new oil, the new currency, our new vehicle of growth, even. From quantified-self movements, to newly emerging forms of economics (such as bit coin and platform capitalism), to sensing-based environments (the internet of things), to the Janus-faced potentials of data analytics, data continues to proliferate, and in the process, transform people, organisations and societies. Given the speculative and hype infused conjuncture we find ourselves in, this conference encourages an engagement with the making and unmaking, potentials and pitfalls, of data, in all its various nomenclatures, guises and manifestations – data work, data practices, data imaginaries, models and infrastructures, and so forth. The so-called ‘data moment’ poses compelling empirical, theoretical and ethical challenges and is an opportunity to take stock of how STS might engage, and think with, data. One move is to rethink data through STS’s long history of engagement with, for example, classification and quantification, as well as the making of data in the sciences and beyond. At the same time, STS’s more recent foray into the arenas of Big-data, algorithms, machine-learning, as well as a host of state and governance issues relating to data citizenship, rights, and privacy, opens up fertile grounds for new forms of analysis, critique and intervention. Reflexively, how might we think about the making of research ‘data’ in STS vis-à-vis the various data producing, data defining activities studied by STS-scholars? The theme is inspirational only, and we welcome papers which address other issues, forms of analysis and concerns related to STS and neighbouring academic fields. We also hold open a space for alternatives to paper presentation sessions, so please feel free to submit abstracts that reflect this or contact us about your idea. Important Information - nAbstracts should be submitted to jmag@itu.dk no later than February 1st - nNotification of acceptance by March 1st - bAbstracts should be no longer than 300 words and contain the name(s) and institutional. affiliation(s) of the author(s). They should also include a selection of 1-5 keywords. - Abstracts can be submitted in either English or Danish. - Registration details will be posted on DASTS.dk closer to the conference date . Keynote speakers

Amade M’charek is Professor Anthropology of Science at the department of Anthropology of the University of Amsterdam. Her research interests are in forensics, forensic anthropology and race. She is the PI of the project Dutchness in Genes and Genealogy, a project examining how Dutchness is enacted in collaborations between population geneticists, archaeologists and genealogists. Amade is also the PI of the project Sexuality & Diversity in the Making. She is the founding chair of the European Network for the Social Studies of Forensics (EUnetSSF) and the convenor of the seminar series Ir/relevance of Race in Science and Society. Her most recent research is on face making and race making in forensic identification, for which she received a five-year ERC consolidator grant in December 2013. Alberto Corsín Jiménez is Associate Professor at the Spanish National Research Council, and an anthropologist of cities and science. With an interest in the history and ethnography of science and experimentation he has been drawn to the study of ‘interfaces’, understood as technical and experimental designs between nature and culture. For the past ten years he has been studying the work of “free culture” urban activism and is interested in how such expressions of “free urbanism” compare with other accounts of informality in the city (auto-construction, makeshift urbanism, slum urbanism, etc.), as well as in the socio-technical assemblages through which such free and open-source prototype projects problematize anew forms of urban complexity.

Governance in the History of Computing

Deadline: January 26 2018

Updated: December 17 2017

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing invites submissions for a special issue titled “Governance in the History of Computing.” Edited by Gerardo Con Diaz (University of California, Davis), this special issue will showcase how formal and informal forms of governance (from law and policy to self-policing) have shaped the history of computing broadly conceived.

In recent years, scholars have developed a keen interest on the historical relationships between information technology and governance. Their work is revealing that computing and telecommunications technologies have been inseparable from the web of formal and informal forms of governance in which they are embedded. In the process they are showing how the study of law, policy, and regulation can shed new light on every major theme in the history of computing—from the design and commercialization of specific technologies, to the politics of their usage, representation, and disposal.

This special issue aims to bring these scholars together. We welcome papers that draw from the history of computing and its allied fields, including STS, media studies, environmental studies, business history, and gender and sexuality studies, to name a few. Papers addressing any time period from the early nineteenth century to recent past are welcome, as are those with any geographical focus.

Some topics of interest include:

· Computing, free speech, privacy, and censorship; Criminal activity, due process, and punishment; Corporate governance and industry standards; Gender and race politics of IT governance; Computing and environmental policy; Internet standards and regulation; Ownership rights and piracy; Influential court opinions at the local, national, or international level

If you are interested, please submit an abstract (250 words) to Gerardo Con Diaz (Condiaz@ucdavis.edu) by January 26, 2018. Accepted papers will be due for peer review in the summer of 2018. You may also contact him with any questions, or to discuss potential topics.

Faculty Position, History of Science and Technology, Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne

Deadline: March 19 2018

https://facultyrecruiting.epfl.ch/position/7962624

Updated: December 15 2017

The College of Humanities at EPFL invites applications for a junior faculty position. We seek individuals who will develop and drive an interdisciplinary research program at the intersection of the humanities and engineering and who are dedicated to teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The holder of this Chair must be a specialist in the history of science and technology of the modern period (19th and 20th centuries), including the recent past, who studies the evolution of science and technical knowledge in connection with major social, economic and/or political changes. The holder of this position will carry out her or his research on the epistemology of exact sciences and life sciences, on scientific knowledge, and also on know-how and technical objects (on their conception, their fabrication and their different uses), aiming to understand the transmission and the worldwide circulation of this knowledge and these objects, highlighting in the process the role of experts together with the more general implication of citizens in the dissemination and circulation of such scientific knowledge.

The holder of this position will also have as a mission to promote the collection of the Museum of Physics of UNIL (http://museephysique.epfl.ch). Experience in promoting knowledge outside the academic world will be an asset.

EPFL, with its main campus located in Lausanne, Switzerland, is a dynamically growing and well-funded institution fostering excellence and diversity.

EPFL offers internationally competitive salaries, start-up resources, and research infrastructure. The EPFL environment is multi-lingual and multi-cultural, with English generally serving as a common interface.

Applications should include a cover letter with a statement of motivation, a curriculum vitae including a list of publications and patents, concise and separate statements of research and teaching interests, together with the names and addresses of at least three potential references for junior and six for senior positions. Applications must be uploaded in PDF format to the recruitment web site:

https://facultyrecruiting.epfl.ch/position/7962624

Formal evaluation of candidates will begin on March 19, 2018 and will continue until the position is filled.

Enquiries may be addressed to:

Prof. Thomas David
Search Committee Chair
Email: dhg_search@epfl.ch

For additional information on EPFL, please consult the web sites http://www.epfl.ch and http://cdh.epfl.ch

EPFL is an equal opportunity employer and a family friendly university.

Assistant Professor in Space and Society, Arizona State University

Deadline: January 26 2018

https://sjobs.brassring.com/TGWebHost/home.aspx

Updated: December 13 2017

Assistant Professor in Space and Society
School for the Future of Innovation in Society, Arizona State University
Job 12224

Arizona State University’s School for the Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS; http://sfis.asu.edu) is seeking applications for a tenure track position at the Assistant Professor level in the area of space and society, with an emphasis on the societal, ethical, and regulatory/governance aspects of an increased human presence in the solar system and beyond. The successful candidate will be expected to collaborate closely with ASU’s School for Earth and Space Exploration (SESE; http://sese.asu.edu).

We seek an outstanding individual who is adept at working across and between disciplines to develop and apply new knowledge around the societal aspects of space exploration broadly understood. Areas of particular interest include, but are not limited to: The development and implementation of space policies and the regulation and governance of activities in space; the societal aspects of space exploration; public-private partnerships in space–based ventures (“New Space”); planetary protection in research, exploration, exploitation and settlement of space; societal aspects of human space exploration; public engagement around space exploration and commercialization; responsible innovation in space-focused technologies and activities; and the societal opportunities and value of space exploration and commercialization.

ASU is already a leader in space science and technology, as well as in informal science education and science engagement around space. The successful candidate will thus be expected to work closely with colleagues across disciplines – including not just space scientists and engineers but also social scientists, informal educators, humanists and artists – to develop a robust and influential program of work and, over time, assume a leadership role in cross-disciplinary collaborations. In accord with the ASU Charter and design aspirations of a New American University, we seek a dynamic scholar and educator who will pursue use-inspired research that transcends disciplinary boundaries and who will further engage effectively with broad communities to both serve and transform society at all levels.

Required: A PhD or other appropriate terminal degree in the social sciences, natural sciences or engineering relevant to the societal aspects of space exploration. Demonstrated potential for independent, well-regarded knowledge generation and utilization. Evidence of potential for effective interdisciplinary research, synthesis and collaboration. A demonstrated commitment to ensuring access to knowledge; excellence in knowledge creation; and the translation of knowledge into societally relevant impacts. Evidence of an ability to inspire and instruct students from diverse backgrounds.

Desired: Experience collaborating effectively with colleagues from diverse disciplines to grow a dynamic academic program; especially between the natural sciences/engineering and the social sciences. Experience in communicating and engaging effectively with non-academic audiences, including policymakers, government agencies, businesses, non-government organizations, and members of the public.

As one of the newest elements of ASU’s approach to building a “New American University” SFIS provides robust opportunities for intellectual fusion, use-inspired research, and global engagement via ongoing projects and centers. SFIS hosts a Ph.D. in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology, a Master of Science and Technology Policy, and a Master of Science degree in Global Technology and Development, as well as an undergraduate major, minor and certificate in Innovation in Society.

To apply, please submit (as a single PDF): 1) a detailed cover letter that includes a description of the applicant's research and teaching interests and experience (limited to 4 pages); 2) a current Curriculum Vitae; and 3) the names, email addresses and telephone numbers of three references. All materials should be submitted as a single PDF document to sfis@asu.edu. Review of applications will begin Friday January 26, 2018. If not filled, a review will occur every Friday thereafter until the search is closed. A background check is required for employment.

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer committed to excellence through diversity (see ASU’s Prohibition Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation policy at http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html). All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law (see ASU’s Title IX policy at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/). Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Program solicitation for CRISP 2.0, National Science Foundation (NSF)

Deadline: March 07 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18523/nsf18523.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

Updated: December 07 2017

The new title (CRISP 2.0) reflects significant changes, in large part designed to make the solicitation more appealing to our communities. One change is that the new solicitation requires only two PIs: an SBE scientist and an engineer. The solicitation (Critical Resilient Interdependent Infrastructure Systems and Processes) still also requires a focus on two or more infrastructures that are interdependent.

Science Policy Fellows, Gulf Research Program, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Med

Deadline: March 14 2018

http://www.nas.edu/gulf/fellowships/science-policy/

Updated: December 07 2017

The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is now accepting applications for Science Policy Fellows.

Our Science Policy Fellows gain first-hand experience at the interface of science and policy as they spend one year alongside decision-makers at agencies across Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, and Florida.
- Fellows who have completed an MA, MS, or MPH/MSPH degree or who are currently enrolled in a doctoral program will receive an annual stipend of $45,000. Fellows who have completed a PhD, ScD, EngD, MD, DrPH, or DVM will receive an annual stipend of $55,000. Stipends will be paid directly to the fellow in monthly disbursements.
- Applications are due March 14, 2018.
- Learn more: http://www.nas.edu/gulf/fellowships/science-policy/

Early-Career Research Fellows, Gulf Research Program, National Academies of Sciences, Eng, and Med

Deadline: February 21 2018

http://www.nas.edu/gulf/fellowships/early-career/

Updated: December 07 2017

The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is now accepting applications for Early-Career Research Fellows.

Our Early-Career Research Fellows receive two years of unrestricted funding to pursue the innovative research and unique collaborations that move coastal science forward.
- An award of $76,000 is paid to each fellow’s institution in the form of a two-year grant. $75,000 is available for the fellow to use for research-related expenses, including equipment purchases, professional travel, professional development courses, trainee support, salary, or any other costs directly related to the fellow’s research. The remaining $1,000 of the award serves as an honorarium for a mentor.
- Applications are due February 21, 2018.
- Learn more: http://www.nas.edu/gulf/fellowships/early-career/

New MA Programme in STS at Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main

Deadline: June 15 2018

https://www.uni-frankfurt.de/63707506/Master

Updated: December 07 2017

New MA programme:

Science and Technology Studies. Economies, Governance, Life.

For more information check https://www.uni-frankfurt.de/63707506/Master
or like us on Facebook under FrankfurtSTS https://www.facebook.com/FrankfurtSTS/

Smart and Connected Communities (S&CC) solicitation, National Science Foundation (NSF)

Deadline: February 28 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf18520

Updated: December 04 2017

The goal of the NSF Smart and Connected Communities (S&CC) program solicitation is to accelerate the creation of the scientific and engineering foundations that will enable smart and connected communities to bring about new levels of economic opportunity and growth, safety and security, health and wellness, and overall quality of life. This goal will be achieved through integrative research projects that pair advances in technological and social dimensions with meaningful community engagement.

It will include regular research grants ($750,000 to $3,000,000, up to 4 years). This program differs from other NSF cross-directorate research programs because it requires a collaboration with one or more physical communities (e.g., cities).

Letter of Intent Due Date(s) (required) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time): January 30, 2018
Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time): February 28, 2018

Research Asst, Phil of sci & tech with focus on logic of research, RWTH Aachen University

Deadline: December 15 2017

http://www.rwth-aachen.de/cms/root/Die-RWTH/Jobs-Ausbildung/Jobboerse/~kbag/JOB-Einzelansicht/file/21246/

Updated: November 29 2017

The Chair of Philosophy of Science and Technology under the direction of Prof. Dr. Gabriele Gramelsberger is part of the Center of Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Studies (currently being established) as well as of the Institute of Philosophy. Its main focus of research and teaching is the transformation of science into computational science.

Your Profile
- Ph.D. degree or equivalent in philosophy with focus on the philosophy of science and/or technology
- good computer skills
- good English skills
- ability to independently conduct scientific work
- creativity, flexibility, team orientation, readiness to teach

Your Responsibilities
Research in the field of philosophy of science and technology with emphasis on applied logic, machine learning and big data in order to prepare an application for research funding in this field. Desirable are experiences in the reflection of current developments in science and technology.

Our Offer:
- The successful candidate will be employed as a public servant.
- The position is to be filled as soon as possible and for 2 years.
- This is a full-time position.
- The salary corresponds to level EG 13 TV-L.

RWTH Aachen University is one of Europe’s leading technical universities. It is certified as a Family-Friendly University. We particularly welcome and encourage applications from women, disabled persons and ethnic minority groups, recognizing they are underrepresented across RWTH Aachen University. The principles of fair and open competition apply and appointments will be made on merit.

Application Number: 21246
Application deadline: 15.12.2017

Mailing address: bewerbungen@humtec.rwth-aachen.de
Prof. Dr. Gabriele Gramelsberger
Chair of Philosophy of Science and Technology
Human Technology Centre
Theaterplatz 14
D-52056 Aachen
Germany

Research Asst, Phil of sci & tech with focus on phil of engineering, RWTH Aachen University

Deadline: December 31 2017

http://www.rwth-aachen.de/cms/root/Die-RWTH/Jobs-Ausbildung/Jobboerse/~kbag/JOB-Einzelansicht/file/21316/

Updated: November 29 2017

The Chair of Philosophy of Science and Technology under the direction of Prof. Dr. Gabriele Gramelsberger is part of the Center of Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Studies (currently being established) as well as of the Institute of Philosophy. Its main focus of research and teaching is the transformation of science into computational science.

Your Profile
- university degree (Master’s or comparable) in philosophy with focus on the philosophy of science and/or technology
- good computer skills, good English skills
- ability to conduct scientific work independently
- creativity, flexibility, team orientation, readiness to teach philosophy

Your Responsibilities
Research in the field of philosophy of science and technology with an emphasis on the philosophy of engineering. Experience in reflecting on current developments in science and technology are welcome, especially on epistemic and structural transformation by the computer.

Our Offer
- The successful candidate will be employed as a public servant.
- The position is to be filled from 1 April 2018 for a period of 3 years.
- This is a part-time position with 50% of the regular weekly working hours.
- The successful candidate has the opportunity to pursue a doctoral degree in this position.
- The salary corresponds to level EG 13 TV-L.

RWTH Aachen University is one of Europe’s leading technical universities. It is certified as a Family-Friendly University. We particularly welcome and encourage applications from women, disabled persons and ethnic minority groups, recognizing they are underrepresented across RWTH Aachen University. The principles of fair and open competition apply and appointments will be made on merit.

Application Number: 21316
Application deadline: 31.12.2017

Mailing address: bewerbungen@humtec.rwth-aachen.de
Prof. Dr. Gabriele Gramelsberger
Chair of Philosophy of Science and Technology
Human Technology Centre
Theaterplatz 14
D-52056 Aachen
Germany

Assistant Professor in Environmental Studies, Carleton University

Deadline: January 03 2018

https://carleton.ca/provost/2017/geography-environmental-studies-environmental-studies-assistant-professor/

Updated: November 27 2017

The Department of Geography and Environmental Studies invites applications from qualified candidates for a tenure-track appointment in Environmental Studies at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning July 1, 2018.

Applications are invited from scholars doing empirically grounded and theoretically significant research from a critical social science perspective who are excited to contribute to our Environmental Studies program. We seek a dynamic colleague to complement and expand existing departmental strengths in research and teaching through work that broadens how the environment is understood, and how environmental challenges are addressed. We welcome applications from scholars focusing on issues such as race, identity, inequality, and justice, as well as those who draw on innovative approaches (for example, feminist political ecology, action research, or Indigenous methodologies) to examine topics that might include but are by no means limited to climate change, water, health, and food or agriculture. Demonstrated commitments to engaged scholarship, or research in conversation with the natural sciences, will be considered assets. Special consideration will be given to applicants who increase departmental faculty diversity.

About the Academic Unit:

Carleton’ s Department of Geography and Environmental Studies (DGES) delivers five undergraduate programs (BA in Environmental Studies, BA and BSc in Geography, BA and BSc in Geomatics), three undergraduate minors (Environmental Studies, Urban Studies, and Geomatics), and three graduate programs in Geography (MA, MSc and PhD). It is home to 400 undergraduate majors and 70 graduate students.

Carleton’s Environmental Studies program (https://carleton.ca/geography/environmental-studies/) is anchored in the critical analysis of nature-society relations, with a mission to train students to be scientifically literate, politically engaged contributors to environmental concerns. We seek a colleague who will teach undergraduate courses in Environmental Studies and contribute to other teaching, research, and service needs, including graduate programs in Geography (https://carleton.ca/geography/graduate-programs-2).

Qualifications:

Applicants must hold a PhD in Environmental Studies, Geography, or a related discipline by time of appointment; demonstrate their dedication to excellence in teaching and research; and be committed to developing a strong program of research and scholarship in Environmental Studies, as evidenced by peer-reviewed publications and active participation in relevant interdisciplinary scholarly debates. Applicants should consult the Department’s website (www.carleton.ca/geography) for details on current research activities and course offerings. Information on Carleton’s strategic and academic planning is available from http://www.carleton.ca/sip/ and https://carleton.ca/provost/academic-planning/.

The successful applicant will be required to develop a research program with appropriate funding and resources to attract and support graduate students, and develop and deliver innovative teaching in Environmental Studies. Ability to make contributions to student recruitment will also be considered an asset.

Application Instructions:

Applications for this entry-level appointment must be sent electronically in separate files which include the following: 1) a cover letter and curriculum vitae; 2) a teaching portfolio that includes relevant experience, evidence of teaching innovation and performance, and pedagogical approaches to teaching; 3) a summary statement of research interests and experience; 4) up to three research publication reprints (individual files); and 5) contact details for three referees.

Please submit your electronic application to the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies, Environmental Studies Position Search Committee at: geography_jobapplication@carleton.ca. Applications submitted in hard copy will not be considered. Questions about this position should be directed to the Departmental Chair, Scott Mitchell, at: geography_jobapplication@carleton.ca with “Environmental Studies Appointment” in the subject line or call the Chair at (613) 520-2561. The closing date for applications is January 3, 2018, or until the position has been filled.

Please indicate in your application if you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada.

Mary Frank Fox elected to American Association for the Advancement of Science

Updated: November 27 2017

Mary Frank Fox, ADVANCE professor in the School of Public Policy at Georgia Institute of Technology, was recently elected as Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a fellow of AAAS is an honor bestowed by the council of scientists of AAAS.

Fellows are recognized for meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications. Fox was recognized “for distinguished research on women and men in scientific organizations and occupations, and for national leadership on issues related to diversity, equity, and excellence in science.”

Fox’s research has introduced and established ways in which scientists’ participation and performance reflect and are affected by the social and organizational settings in which they are educated and work, with significant implications for science and technology policy. Her research is published in over 60 different journals, books, and collections. She has brought to the national forefront issues of diversity, equity, and excellence through her work with advisory boards and panels including those as Member of the Social Science Advisory Board, National Center for Women and Information Technology; Council Member, Section on Science, Knowledge, and Technology, American Sociological Association; Advisory Board, Expanding Computer Education Pathways Alliance; Editorial Board Member of Social Studies of Science; and elected member of the AAAS Electorate Nominating Committee, Division on Social, Economic, and Political Sciences.

Professor in Technology and Social Change, Linköping University, Sweden

Deadline: January 15 2018

https://liu.se/en/work-at-liu/vacancies?rmpage=job&rmjob=6811&rmlang=UK

Updated: November 27 2017

Professor in Technology and Social Change, formally based at the Department of Thematic Studies

Technology and Social Change is a nationally and internationally leading environment for research and education in how people create and use technology, and how technological change is interwoven with cultural patterns, everyday life, politics and economy. Third cycle and first cycle studies specialising in issues of technology and social change are carried out at the department.

Research and teaching within the department are focused on a number of important technological fields, and conducted from a number of different theoretical perspectives. The activities are currently organized into four broad programme areas. One group researches topics of agency, care, embodiment, knowledge practices, normativities, and subjectivities in science, medicine and other technological practices. These topics are examined from social, cultural, philosophical, and ethical perspectives, contributing to feminist theory, medical humanities, and science, technology and society studies. A second group deals with the development and transformation of infrastructure systems, such as energy, IT, transport and buildings, and how these systems are governed at a regional and local level, and how they are used in and impact our daily lives. A third group researches valuation as practice: the use of rankings, evaluations and indicators within the fields of science and technology and beyond, including clinical trials, big data, patient experiences, the development and use of algorithms. The fourth group focuses on the broad interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities and addresses the subject of nature and ecological matters. Special attention is paid to discourses of environmental consequences and risks related to the development of large scale socio-technical systems. Tema T participates in national doctoral schools in 'Environmental Humanities' and 'Energy Systems' and plays a key role in the recently started undergraduate programme in 'Urban and Regional Planning'.

The tasks within the announced professorship will comprise individual research, teaching and supervision of post-graduate students, research leadership, active responsibility for the continued development of Tema T, and collegial participation in intellectual, leadership and administrative roles.

The candidate shall demonstrate scientific expertise and a publication record at a high international level within fields relevant for the study of technology and social change. Documented scientific skills within humanities and/or social science are of particular merit as is research in interdisciplinary contexts.

The candidate will also have a track record of receiving external donations and lead research projects, collaborate with participants outside of the academy and supervision of post-graduate students.

Evidence of pedagogical skills from teaching in fields relevant for 'Urban and Regional Planning' are an additional merit.

Assistant/ Associate/ Full Professor (Open Rank), Societechnical scholar, University of Maryland

Deadline: December 15 2017

https://ejobs.umd.edu/postings/56154

Updated: November 27 2017

The University of Maryland’s College of Information Studies (iSchool) invites applications from sociotechnical scholars at all ranks. We seek exceptional candidates with high-quality research and publication records in interdisciplinary fields that include or blend social and behavioral sciences, economics, law, and/or human-computer-interaction.

We are growing quickly, and so we seek to hire faculty members conducting a broad range of sociotechnical research. We are especially interested in the following specializations, but strong candidates in any sociotechnical area are encouraged to apply:

- Privacy and security
- Community engagement, such as open data, citizen or open science
- Digital government, information and civic challenges, urban computing

We are also particularly interested in scholars who study phenomenon beyond the individual level (including, but not limited to group, organizational, national, and societal levels), who apply theory to sociotechnical research problems, and who complement and extend existing research being done in the iSchool. We welcome applications from scholars conducting research grounded in theory, rooted in empirical methods, and producing broadly applicable and transferable results that augment policy, knowledge, and practice.

Director, Center for Engineering Ethics and Society (CEES), National Academy of Engineering

Deadline: January 08 2018

http://www.nationalacademies.org/humanresources/index.html

Updated: November 21 2017

Job req # 170214-4

The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Center for Engineering Ethics and Society (CEES) focuses the talents of the nation on addressing the ethical and social dimensions of engineering, as both a profession and an agent of innovation. The Center’s mission is to engage current and future engineering leaders in industry and academia as well as representatives of public and private organizations and government in (1) identifying and examining the ethical and societal challenges of engineering, (2) bringing these challenges to the attention of the engineering profession and society, and (3) developing programs and recommendations to address these challenges.

CEES activities address ethically significant issues that arise in engineering and scientific research, education, and practice for individual engineers and scientists as well as professional organizations and institutions. They may involve cooperation and collaboration with NAE's sister academies, the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine, as well as other program units of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM).

As a crucial component of its mission, CEES manages the NAE Online Ethics Center for Engineering and Science (OEC), a dynamic, widely used electronic repository of resources on ethics in science, engineering, research, and education for engineers, scientists, scholars, educators, students, and interested citizens. CEES also organizes studies, workshops, public symposia, and educational activities; publishes informative materials; and collaborates with industry, educators, and students to advance its mission.

The CEES Director will work closely with the NAE Executive Officer, NAE Program Office Director, and an appointed CEES Advisory Group to develop a program strategy, determine budget and staffing requirements, secure funding, and implement a multiyear portfolio of activities that advance the CEES mission, ensuring that CEES and the OEC meet their stated objectives. As part of these responsibilities, the Director will conduct background research on topics for new programs or activities; develop project prospectuses/proposals and solicit and negotiate funding with sponsors; hire, train, and supervise staff; and represent CEES within and outside the National Academies. To ensure diverse perspectives and representation, the Director will work with staff in the NAE Program Office and across the NASEM as well as with members of the National Academies, educators and other experts in science, engineering, and ethics research, practice, education, and policy, public and private sector sponsors, community representatives, engineering and scientific professional societies, and other groups to identify creative and effective ways to work with these stakeholders in furthering the CEES mission. The CEES Director will report directly to the NAE Program Office Director.

Preferred qualifications: PhD in engineering, physical sciences, social sciences, humanities, or public policy with extensive knowledge of scholarship in engineering and science ethics, history of technology, engineering and science education, and public policy. Extensive experience interacting with engineering and science educators, employers, professional societies, public and private sector funders, and policymakers, and strong knowledge of/experience with fundraising and strategic planning.

Minimum requirements: Master’s degree in engineering, physical sciences, social sciences, humanities, or public policy or equivalent knowledge with 6 years of related professional experience, 2 of them in a supervisory capacity. Strong program/project development, management, and facilitation skills. Ability to independently develop and manage multiple complex projects, work successfully in a team environment, and form and maintain effective teams. Experience with proposal writing and fundraising. Experience working in complex environments with a high degree of organizational effectiveness. Excellent communication skills with a proven ability to effectively interact with all levels of staff and constituents. Ability to understand and communicate technical/scientific issues with diverse audiences; solve problems using originality and ingenuity; serve as a resource to others in the resolution of complex problems and issues; operate using substantial latitude for independent judgment and action; train and develop staff; and develop and maintain effective relationships and communication with coworkers, employees in other National Academies units, and external constituents.

Applications including a cover letter, names and contact information of three references, and curriculum vitae should be submitted online no later than January 8, 2018, to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Office of Human Resources http://www.nationalacademies.org/humanresources/index.html Job req # 170214-4

The National Academy of Engineering (NAE; http://www.nae.edu) is a private, independent, nonprofit institution that provides engineering leadership in service to the nation. Established in 1964, it operates under the same congressional act of incorporation that established the National Academy of Sciences, signed in 1863 by President Lincoln. Under this charter the NAE is directed “whenever called upon by any department or agency of the government, to investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art.” In addition to its role as advisor to the federal government, the NAE conducts independent studies, symposia, and public information activities that identify and illuminate issues at the intersections of engineering, technology, and society that impact our quality of life. These activities are carried out both independently by the NAE Program Office and jointly with other units of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Current program activities of the NAE address the advance of engineering education, research, and practice; the vitality of the nation’s engineering workforce; public understanding of engineering and technology; and the role of engineering in addressing grand challenges facing society in the areas of energy, environment, health, resilience, and economic growth.

Lecturer in the School of Communication, Simon Fraser University

Deadline: January 03 2018

http://www.sfu.ca/vpacademic/faculty_openings/cat.html

Updated: November 21 2017

The School of Communication, at Simon Fraser University, invites applications from outstanding candidates for a continuing appointment at the rank of Lecturer, commencing summer 2018.

Candidates are expected to have a completed Ph.D. (or Ph.D. near completion) in a relevant subject area, with substantial experience, and a record of achievement in undergraduate teaching. We are looking for a scholar with expertise in curriculum development and pedagogy in the field of communication, and a research publication record. Candidates are expected to demonstrate a clear potential to contribute to the School’s teaching culture. The successful candidate will be a leader and innovator in teaching and learning and demonstrate a range and versatility in undergraduate teaching. Subfields may include media and culture, technology and society, political economy and policy, globalization. We seek someone who demonstrates enthusiasm for teaching foundational undergraduate courses and core courses in theory and methods. Candidates should have the ability to teach theoretical concepts and empirical and applied research.

Situated in the Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology, the School of Communication is a national and global leader in the discipline. The School is a dynamic site of research and teaching in critical communication studies, and in a range of areas, established and emergent, including: media and culture, technology and society, political economy of global communication, research design and communication research methods, cultural industries and policy, communication policy and industry, digital media and culture, visual culture, history of communication, media production, media literacy, popular culture, applied communication, and more.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. Simon Fraser University is committed to employment equity and welcomes applications from all qualified women and men, including visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ-identified persons.

Applications must include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a teaching dossier (including examples of applied pedagogy), and a sample of published work, or work prepared for publication if applicable. Please submit all documents in a single PDF with bookmarks. In addition, three letters of reference should be sent under separate cover.

Dr. Peter Chow-White, Director School of Communication Simon Fraser University
8888 University Drive
Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6
Website: http://www.sfu.ca/communication.html

Review of applications will begin on Wednesday, January 3, 2018, and continue until the position is filled.
The position is subject to funding and final approval by the SFU Board of Governors. Under the authority of the University Act, personal information that is required by the University for academic appointment competitions will be collected. For further details, please see:
http://www.sfu.ca/vpacademic/faculty_openings/collection_notice.html

Workshop on Science, Technology, Society (STS)/History, Technology, Society

April 19 2018 to April 20 2018 | Historical Archive of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece

Deadline: December 10 2017

Updated: November 21 2017

Bioeconomy, Biotechnology, Medical Technologi
The workshop is organized in the context of the research project “The public debate on umbilical cord blood banking in Greece: Approaches from the interdisciplinary field Science, Technology, Society (STS)”. This project is funded by the Onassis Foundation and is hosted by the Department of History and Philosophy of Science , School of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens.

This 2-day research workshop will focus on recent approaches to biotechnology and medical technologies from the fields of Science, Technology, Society (STS) and History, Technology, Society (HTS). The emphasis is placed on the growing economy of biobanks, especially in connection to the bioeconomy of umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking. The workshop will bring together scholars working on UCB biobanking and the STS/HTS research community. We invite contributions from scholars who are interested in critical approaches to the theoretical framework and the methodology involved in STS/HTS perspectives on UCB biobanking. *Possible topics include:* - Commercialization initiatives in UCB biobanking / the production of biovalue(s). - Ideologies of UCB biobanking. - Varieties of UCB biobanking institutional configurations and regulatory issues. - Public awareness and citizen participation in UCB donation/storage: the perspective of the voluntary donor, the organization of patient engagement, other non-expert involvement in UCB banking settings. - UCB biobanking in global, national and local media (newspapers, tv broadcasting, social media). The connection between media coverage/framing and UCB banking practices and health policies. - Futuristic discourses and science/technology forecasting of UCB bioeconomies: challenges, public health policies and cooperation strategies (e.g. the financial sustainability of UCB banks, the future value of UCB as inscribed in current banking configurations). - Big data issues in UCB banking settings. - Approaches to the use of UCB in therapeutic practices (allogeneic and autologous transplants) and regenerative medicine. *Structure of the research workshop:* The workshop will consist of two parts. During the first part, doctoral and post-doctoral researchers will present their ongoing research projects on biomedical technologies and will discuss theoretical and methodological challenges with STS/HTS scholars. During the second part, the sessions will focus on theoretical reflections and empirical research regarding the configurations of UCB biobanking. Τhe workshop will additionally include a discussion with stakeholders active in the field of UCB biobanking in Greece. During the first day of the workshop, there will be a keynote speech (name: TBA).

*Participation* in the workshop is free of cost. A limited number of travel grants will be offered. *Proposals*: Proposals should include an abstract (ca. 300 words) and a brief biographical note (ca. 100 words). Please indicate whether you are applying for a travel grant and the grant amount that you apply for. Proposals are to be submitted by email to sts.biobanks@phs.uoa.gr by *December 10th of 2017*. *You will be notified if your proposal has been accepted by January 12th of 2018. *

If you have any questions, please contact the organizers at sts.biobanks@phs.uoa.gr

Nuclear Diplomacies

November 09 2018 to November 11 2018 | SOKENDAI’s Hayama Campus in Kanagawa, Japan

Deadline: February 15 2018

https://nucleardiplomacies.weebly.com/

Updated: November 21 2017

​Nuclear Diplomacies: Their Past, Present, and Future.
National Technical University of Athens, *Greece*, June 2019 Responding to the recent North Korea crisis the US President Donald Trump tweeted on August 30, 2017 that “talking is not the answer.” Minutes later the US Defense Secretary James Mattis argued to reporters, contradicting President Trump’s statement that “We’re never out of diplomatic solutions.” While the president undermines the role of diplomacy, diplomats and scientists remind us in the blandest way the power of science diplomacy, one of the emerging key elements of the Cold War era. A turning point in the global socio-economic environment for science and technology, the Cold War has been strongly connected to the rapid growth of government and military spending on research and development; the development of closer ties between the military and the academia; the proliferation of large scale research projects. It was the time that international relations began to play even more significant roles in shaping science and technology than before, highlighting the role of diplomacy in resolving political conflicts among nations with an emphasis on those dealing with nuclear energy and military programs. But although for scientists international collaborations have long been constitutive and natural part of their work even in periods of intense political upheavals, to diplomats and policy makers the institutional link of science to diplomacy has been fairly new. In 2009 in a founding text the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) described science diplomacy through three types of activities: a. science informs issues of diplomatic concern (science in diplomacy); b. diplomacy facilitates scientific cooperation on an international level (diplomacy for science) and c. science functions as a diplomatic tool when other diplomatic mechanisms fail (science for diplomacy).

A year later the British Royal Society organized a landmark meeting in collaboration to the AAAS enforcing the idea that although science diplomacy is not new, it has never been more important. Given the recent US-North Korean conflict over the latter’s nuclear program, nuclear diplomacy emerges once again as key in international relations. This workshop seeks to bring together scholars working on the history of nuclear sciences and the role of international organizations in shaping nuclear diplomacy; diplomatic historians and political scientists focusing on the ways nuclear scientists and engineers have contributed, and, continue to do so, in international negotiations. We are interested in papers employing historical, philosophical, sociological methods and methodological tools from political sciences and international relations in order to a. investigate the notion of nuclear diplomacy/ies and explore its various aspects including diplomacy concerning nuclear energy production as well as the circulation of related knowledge and materials. b. critically analyze those national, political,economic, and technological interests that have shaped nuclear diplomacies throughout the post World War Period (without excluding earlier instances of nuclear diplomacies) c. understand the significance of nuclear diplomacies in today’s international geopolitical order and their future evolvement. Possible topics include, but not limited to, nuclear diplomacy in and around international organizations such as IAEA; bilateral negotiations as well as public diplomacy in relation to exchange of material and human resources; science diplomacy concerning radiation protection, nuclear safeguards, and technical assistance programs; and the historical role of diplomats and science/technical experts in negotiating nuclear agreements. This workshop is also concerned with the historical formulation of nuclear issues as a discrete diplomatic and cultural concern. This concern may point to conducts beyond the official actions of institutions and states, and the possibility of yet to be identified material and discursive factors in those conducts. We welcome papers examining historically indeterminate nature of nuclear knowledge, subjects, and power.

The first workshop takes place in SOKENDAI’s Hayama Campus in Kanagawa, Japan, which is located approximately two hours from the Haneda Airport. Accommodations and meals will be provided, but participants are responsible to fund their transportation. Paper proposals (no more than 400 words) are due *February 15th, 2018.* Participants will be notified by *mid-March 2018*. Those accepted are expected to submit full *first draft papers on August 30, 2018*. A second-follow up workshop will take place in *June 2019* in Athens, Greece where full papers are expected to be submitted and presented. The two workshops will lead to the publication of a peer review collected volume. Launching a pilot effort we call *editorial sponsorship*, the editors of *History + Technology* will provide editorial support during the two workshops, with the aim of helping participants produce manuscripts for a special issue of the journal based on the project’s themes, and for submission to other publications.

Call for Papers: Tapuya, the new Latin American Science, Technology and Society

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/25729861.2017.1361123

Updated: November 21 2017

Tapuya, the new Latin American Science, Technology and Society journal, has a number of call for papers open on different topics. I would like to draw your attention to the special issue I´m co-editing with Claudia Magallanes Blanco on Indigenous Knowledges and Technologies. Please find further information on submission at the link.

And this is the special issue description: Indigenous Knowledges and Technologies Editors: Tiago Ribeiro Duarte, Universidade de Brasília, Brazil Claudia Magallanes-Blanco, Universidad Iberomericana-Puebla, Mexico Indigenous knowledges and technologies continue to be a marginal topic in STS. Yet there has been an array of approaches to such phenomena from such other fields as media studies, visual anthropology, telecommunications, and human rights. STS appears to still be in the process of decolonization insofar as it continues to ignore knowledges, technologies, and epistemologies treated by Europeans as irrelevant to knowledge production. This cluster welcomes submissions on indigenous knowledges and technology appropriation, biopiracy, and/or technological policy making, indigenous uses and developments of information and communication technologies, decolonial and postcolonial indigenous STS, and clashes between indigenous and modern ontologies.

Reformatting the World: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Technology and the Humanities

February 23 2018 to February 24 2018 | York University (Canada)

Deadline: December 08 2017

https://yuhumaconference.wordpress.com/

Updated: November 21 2017

The Graduate Program in Humanities and the Humanities Graduate Student Association (HuGSA) at York University are pleased to announce an interdisciplinary conference interrogating the critical role of technology, both past and present, in shaping human culture and society. Technology, in the broadest sense, has enriched our lives by opening up new vistas of knowledge about ourselves (or our selves) and the natural world. Digital technologies, for example, have made possible new, highly-advanced forms of social organization. They have also revolutionized almost every aspect of our lives, from travel, communication, entertainment, culture and the arts to food, medicine, education, politics, and science.

However, technology is also associated with the rise of technical rationality and a cold, calculating approach to the creation and application of technological innovation. From the industrial revolution to the development of the atomic bomb, politics in alliance with private interests have wreaked havoc on the environment, peoples and communities across the world, and threatens to alter or destroy the things we value the most. Where, for instance, is the place for privacy, freedom, spirituality, and other aspects of the human experience as we move forward in increasingly technologically administered bodies and societies? Are we destined to become slaves to our own creations, the “sex organs of the machine world,” as Marshall McLuhan predicted? Can humanism and morality withstand—or even make use of—technology for the genuine betterment of humankind?

Or, perhaps it is technology itself that must be rethought. What changes if we conceive of a technology as anything instrumental (a material, tool, text, medium, digital platform, etc.) and/or social (writing, discourse, institution, etc.) that exerts its own subtle pressure, penetrating deeply into in human experience or culture? What happens when our discourses of social/political/cultural technological “progress” are supplemented with that of “affordances” and “constraints?” In other words, can we attend to the stakes of technicity itself as an increasingly prominent (and often assumed) conceptual framework? How can such interdisciplinary approaches trace the real and imagined effects of a given technology across past and present human societies, and where do discourses and practices of technology and the humanities converge?

Panel themes and topics might include (but are not limited to):
• Digital Humanities: collaboration, new perspectives and communicative technology
• Technology and the Arts: literature, fine arts, music, film, theatre, sound, fashion, etc.
• Human–Machine Interaction: cyborgs, the social and the technological,
• Biotechnology and Biopolitics: policies, ethics and technologies of living organisms
• Epistemologies: disciplines, divides and the production of knowledge
• Media Studies: communication and culture, social impact of media
• History and Philosophy of Technology: past and present perspectives
• Profit and loss: Potentials of new technologies and what is made antiquated in turn
• Prophets and the lost: how varieties of spirituality have adapted with/to technology

We welcome submissions from graduate students of any level, as well as early career researchers, from a wide cross-section of disciplines, fields and critical approaches, including (but not limited to) anthropology, art history, classics, communications and culture, comparative literature, critical theory, cultural memory, digital humanities, education, film studies, fine arts, futurism, historicism, history of science and technology, media studies, medical humanities, medicine, philosophy, popular cultural studies, religious studies, representation studies, sociology, translation studies, and women’s studies.

Submissions may take the form of 20-minute papers, or 12–15 minute roundtable papers in either English or French. Those wishing to participate are invited to submit a 250-word abstract to humacon...@gmail.com by 8 December, 2017.

Submissions must be accompanied by:
• the presenter’s name
• institutional affiliation, program and level of study
• e-mail address
• tentative title
• a short (150-word) bio
• as well as an indication of whether any computing or electronic equipment (e.g., laptop, projector) is needed

We are also very pleased to welcome practitioners of digital technologies who wish to present their work. We are offering access to the Digital Media Studio in the York University School of the Arts, Media, and Performance & Design building in the evenings for post-panel workshops. This room is equipped with Oculus Rift and Vive virtual reality hardware and Unreal virtual reality software. For those wishing to organize such a session, please contact us with technology requirements. Other submissions, in the form of poster sessions, visual art, or performance, will also be considered.

Reformater le monde: Une conférence interdisciplinaire sur technologie et les Humanités

Université York (Canada)


février 23 - 24, 2018

L'Association des étudiants des cycles supérieurs en humanités (HuGSA) de l'Université York est heureuse d'annoncer une conférence interdisciplinaire sur le rôle crucial de la technologie, passée et présente, dans la formation de la culture et de la société humaines. La technologie, au sens le plus large du terme, a enrichi nos vies en ouvrant de nouvelles perspectives de connaissances sur nous-mêmes (ou sur nous-mêmes) et sur le monde naturel. Les technologies numériques, par exemple, ont rendu possibles de nouvelles formes d'organisation sociale très avancées. Ils ont également révolutionné presque tous les aspects de nos vies, du voyage, de la communication, du divertissement, de la culture et des arts à la nourriture, à la médecine, à l'éducation, à la politique et à la science.

Cependant, la technologie est également associée à la montée de la rationalité technique et à une approche froide et calculatrice de la création et de l'application de l'innovation technologique. De la révolution industrielle au développement de la bombe atomique, la politique en alliance avec des intérêts privés a dévasté l'environnement, les peuples et les communautés à travers le monde et menace d'altérer ou de détruire les choses que nous apprécions le plus. Où, par exemple, est le lieu de la vie privée, de la liberté, de la spiritualité et d'autres aspects de l'expérience humaine à mesure que nous avançons dans des organismes et des sociétés de plus en plus technologiquement administrés? Sommes-nous destinés à devenir esclaves de nos propres créations, les «organes sexuels du monde de la machine», comme l'avait prédit Marshall McLuhan? L'humanisme et la moralité peuvent-ils résister - ou même utiliser - la technologie pour le véritable salut de l'humanité?

Ou peut-être que c'est la technologie elle-même qui doit être repensée. Ce qui change si nous concevons une technologie comme instrumentale (matériel, outil, texte, support, plateforme numérique, etc.) et / ou sociale (écriture, discours, institution, etc.) qui exerce sa propre pression subtile, pénétrant profondément dans l'expérience humaine ou la culture? Que se passe-t-il lorsque nos discours de «progrès» social / politique / culturel sont complétés par celui de «affordances» et de «contraintes»? En d'autres termes, pouvons-nous prendre en compte les enjeux de la technicité elle-même? cadre conceptuel? Comment ces approches interdisciplinaires peuvent-elles retracer les effets réels et imaginaires d'une technologie donnée à travers les sociétés humaines passées et présentes, et où convergent les discours et les pratiques de la technologie et des humanités?

Les thèmes et sujets du panel peuvent inclure (mais ne sont pas limités à):
• Digital Humanities: collaboration, nouvelles perspectives et technologie communicative;
• La technologie et les arts: littérature, beaux-arts, musique, cinéma, théâtre, son, mode, etc.;
• Interaction Homme-Machine: les cyborgs, le social et le technologique;
• Biotechnologie et biopolitique: politiques, éthique et technologies des organismes vivants;
• Epistémologies: disciplines, divisions et production de connaissances;
• Études médiatiques: communication et culture, impact social des medias;
• Histoire et philosophie de la technologie: perspectives passées et présentes;
• Profit et perte: Potentiels des nouvelles technologies et ce qui est rendu archaïque à son tour;
• Les prophètes et les perdus: comment les variétés de spiritualité se sont adaptées avec / à la technologie.

Nous accueillons les candidatures d'étudiants diplômés de tous les niveaux, ainsi que des chercheurs en début de carrière, issus d'un large éventail de disciplines, domaines et approches critiques, incluant (mais non limité à) anthropologie, histoire de l'art, classiques, communication et culture, littérature, théorie critique, mémoire culturelle, humanités numériques, éducation, études cinématographiques, beaux-arts, futurisme, historicisme, histoire de la science et de la technologie, études médiatiques, sciences humaines médicales, médecine, philosophie, études culturelles populaires, études religieuses, études de représentation, sociologie , des études de traduction et des études féminines.

Les soumissions peuvent prendre la forme de documents de 20 minutes ou de tables rondes de 12 à 15 minutes en anglais ou en français. Les personnes souhaitant participer sont invitées à soumettre un résumé de 250 mots à humacon...@gmail.com avant le 8 décembre, 2017.

Les soumissions doivent être accompagnées par les suivantes:
• le nom du présentateur;
• Affiliation institutionnelle, programme et niveau d'études;
• adresse e-mail;
• titre provisoire;
• une courte biographie (150 mots);
• ainsi qu'une indication de la nécessité d'équipement informatique ou électronique (par exemple, ordinateur portable, projecteur).

Nous sommes également très heureux d'accueillir des praticiens des technologies numériques qui souhaitent présenter leur travail. Nous offrons l'accès au Digital Media Studio dans les locaux de l'École des arts, des médias et de la performance et du design de l'Université York le soir pour des ateliers post-panel. Cette salle est équipée du matériel de réalité virtuelle Oculus Rift et Vive et du logiciel de réalité virtuelle Unreal. Pour ceux qui souhaitent organiser une telle session, veuillez nous contacter avec les exigences technologiques. D'autres soumissions, sous forme de séances d'affiches, d'art visuel ou de performance, seront également considérées.

Contact Info:
Department of Humanities Graduate Conference Committee, York University
humacon...@gmail.com
https://yuhumaconference.wordpress.com/

34th EGOS Colloquium 2017

July 05 2018 to July 07 2018 | Estonian Business School (EBS), Tallinn, Estonia

Deadline: January 08 2018

https://www.egosnet.org/2018_tallinn/paper_submission_important_information

Updated: November 21 2017

Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected

If you intend to submit a short paper, please take note of the “Guidelines and criteria for the submission of short papers at EGOS Colloquia”.

The convenors of the sub-theme to which you have submitted your short paper will let you know by mid/end of February 2018 whether your short paper is accepted or rejected.

However: if the convenors of “your” sub-theme have decided to send your short paper to the so-called “Re-Routing Pool” – because they think that your paper would fit better in another sub-theme –, it may happen that you will be notified only by beginning/mid of March 2018.

If your short paper is accepted, you are expected to submit [via the EGOS website] a full paper version (approx. 20–25 pages) by June 25, 2018 at the latest – which you [and/or your co-author/s] will then personally present in your sub-theme at the 34th EGOS Colloquium 2018 in Tallinn.

Furthermore, please note:

You can only submit ONE short paper to ONE sub-theme with your EGOS number!

You are expected to attend all 7 sessions (= Sessions I to VII) of the sub-theme to which you have submitted your accepted short/full paper!

10th conference DIAGRAMS

June 18 2018 to June 22 2018 | Edinburgh

Deadline: November 30 2017

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=diagrams2018

Updated: November 21 2017

It will include presentations of refereed Papers, Abstracts, and Posters, alongside tutorials, workshop sessions, and a graduate symposium. It provides a united forum for all areas concerned with the study of diagrams.

We invite submissions for peer review that focus on any issue pertaining to diagrams. In particular, we welcome papers on visualization in science communication.

Submissions can be: - Long Papers (16 pages max.) - Short Papers (8 pages max.) - Posters (4 pages, min. and max.) - Abstracts (3 pages max.) Long Papers and Short Papers categories should report on original research contributions. Abstracts category should report on significant research contributions, which may have been published elsewhere (such submissions must clearly cite prior work) or are intended to be published elsewhere. Poster submission category should be used for work-in-progress.

How to Submit For all categories, the new deadlines are:

- Pre-submission of a title and a short descriptive abstract (200 words) due by 30th November 2017. - Submission of full versions due by 7th December 2017

For all categories, submissions should be made by the respective deadline via EasyChair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=diagrams2018 All submissions must follow Springer’s LNCS formatting guidelines: https://www.springer.com/gp/computer-science/lncs/conference-proceedings-guidelines The Proceedings will be published by Springer. The Long papers, Short papers, and Posters will be indexed by Springer, whilst the Abstracts will not.

Please find the detailed call for papers and the program committee at the following page: http://www.diagrams-conference.org/2018/home/cfp/116-2/

Navigating Habitats: Feminist Explorations of Disability, Climates, Ecosystems, and Technologies

August 01 2018 to August 05 2018 | Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA

Deadline: February 26 2018

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=femmss7

Updated: November 21 2017

Submission deadline noon February 26th, 2018 PST; acceptance notifications by noon April 2nd, 2018, PST.

Submissions are invited for the seventh meeting of the Association for Feminist Epistemologies, Methodologies, Metaphysics, and Science Studies hosted by Sharyn Clough, to be held at the Courtyard by Marriott hotel in downtown Corvallis, Weds. August 1 through Sunday August 5, 2018. FEMMSS is a multidisciplinary organization. We welcome papers, posters, panels, and workshops from any academic discipline and from outside the academy. We especially encourage work that crosses traditional boundaries—disciplinary and academic/non-academic, among others—to expose how issues of disability, gender, race, socioeconomic status, and other areas of difference shape our understandings of the world, including science scholarship, participation, policies, outcomes, and practice. In addition to showcasing innovative work, FEMMSS aims to build a supportive network in feminist science studies, epistemologies, metaphysics, and feminist methodologies across disciplines, from humanities to social sciences to STEM fields. It especially aims to include and encourage those who are underrepresented or are in other ways disadvantaged within their home disciplines.

Topics for FEMMSS 7 include but need not be limited to:

1. Disability, its technologies, and epistemologies 2. Ecosystems, their climates, and ways of knowing them 3. Indigenous ways of knowing, the environment, and disability 4. Public understanding, the environment, and disability 5. Disabling, racialized, and gendered epistemologies and methodologies in the disciplines. 6. The ethics, politics, ontology, and epistemology of biomedical research 7. Engineering technologies for environmental justice and global peace 8. STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education: Strategies for equity throughout the pipeline (pre-K through gray) 9. Accessibility and STEM education: Supporting disabled students and staff 10. Professional Development: Thriving when you are ‘the only…’ in your unit 11. Professional Development: Promoting interdisciplinary scholarship/service/teaching Submission instructions: You are permitted one submission, unless you are submitting a poster. If you are submitting a poster, you can also submit an abstract for a paper, panel, or workshop. To submit please go to https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=femmss7: and sign up for an account. Guidance on making presentations accessible will be provided to presenters on notification of acceptance of a submission. Direct questions regarding submissions to tracy.bowell@waikato.ac.nz

● Individual papers and posters: Please provide a title, put a 300-word abstract in the text box, and select 3-10 topics/keywords. At the beginning of the abstract indicate if your submission is a poster. Please do not include any identifying information in your abstract. ● Panels: For the panel as a whole, provide a title, include a 300-word abstract in the text box, and select 3-10 topics/keywords. Upload a single document that includes each paper’s title and 300-word abstract. Please take care not to identify authors in the abstracts. ● Workshops: Provide a title, include a 300-word abstract with goals and rationale in the text box, and select 3-10 keywords/topics. Workshops require audience/participant engagement of some kind beyond a Q/A session. Upload an additional 300-word description of the activities in which your audience/participants will engage. Consider activities that are broadly accessible, or that have variants that make them accessible. We can help you with questions of accessibility. Please take care not to identify authors in the abstract or activity description. ● Keywords/Topics: Easy Chair requires submission of 3 keywords. You can copy keywords from the topic list or create unique keywords if your topics are not on the list.

FEMMSS was founded in 2004. Central aims of the organization include the encouragement of networking and collaboration among scholars in diverse fields; the development of analytic and pedagogical skills to aid such interdisciplinary work; the support of women and other underrepresented scholars in the various humanities, social sciences, and STEM fields, and the sharing of strategies for facilitating their success; and the mentoring of junior scholars. FEMMSS has a strong commitment to work that crosses boundaries among disciplines and between the academy and the public.

Note: Oregon State University in Corvallis, OR is located in the traditional territory of the Chepenefa ("Mary's River") band of the Kalapuya. After the Kalapuya Treaty (Treaty of Dayton) in 1855, Kalapuya people were forcibly removed to what are now the Grand Ronde and Siletz reservations, and are now members of Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon (https://www.grandronde.org) and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians (http://ctsi.nsn.us).

ADA guest rooms have been reserved at the conference hotel for participants. Further accessibility information for the venue can be found here: http://www.marriott.com/hotels/fact-sheet/travel/eugco-courtyard-corvallis/#accessbility

Intimacies online, online intimacies

May 30 2018 to June 01 2018 | Roskilde University, Denmark

Deadline: January 15 2018

Updated: November 21 2017

We are delighted to announce this international conference about intimacy online, digitally mediated intimacies and how intimacies influence (new) mediascapes.

Online media are increasingly intersecting and intertwined with our daily lives, bodily and intimate practices, and relationships. This conference highlights how different digital, social and online media enable and/or produce new intimacies, as well as how practices and understandings of intimacy are both embedded in digitally mediated communication and generate innovative uses or forms of new media.

We invite papers (or other forms of expression) that explore various media sites and forms, including (but not limited to) social media, digital media, online media and mobile devices. And we invite papers investigating various intimacies, including but not limited to intimate and/or affective encounters, relationalities, practices, belongings, desires, proximities, kinships, friendships, or communities, as well as online and /or digital affective intensities, viralities, and connectivities. Papers discussing both methodological and empirical aspects are welcome.

Papers analysing the bodily and intimate doing of technology, and papers questioning the boundaries between body, media, technology and affect are welcome. Also, papers discussing the commercialization and capitalization of intimacies online are of interest. In particular, we welcome papers analyzing the ways in which new mediated intimacies (re)produce, configure and/or challenge power relations and hierarchal structures in relation to: • Sexual cultures, dating and hook-up, sexualities, and sexual identities • Kinship and new (queer) families and reproduction • Bodies and bodily markers of difference • Migration, nation, borders, and surveillance • Activism, resistance, counter publics, and subcultures

The confirmed keynotes include Prof. Jack Halberstam (University of Southern California and Columbia University, US), Dr. Debra Ferreday (Lancaster University), and Dr. Sharif Mowlabocus (University of Sussex).

The conference will take place at Roskilde University, Denmark, May 30th– June 1st, 2018. Please send your abstract to newmedianewintimacies@gmail.com. Abstracts should be maximum 200 words long and written in English. Please include your name, title, and affiliation. Deadline of submission of abstract: Jan. 15th, 2018.

LIMITS 2018 Fourth Workshop on Computing within Limits

May 12 2018 to May 13 2018 | Toronto, Canada

Deadline: February 02 2018

http://www.computingwithinlimits.org

Updated: November 21 2017

ABOUT ACM LIMITS 2018

The ACM LIMITS workshop aims to foster discussion on the impact of present and future ecological, material, energetic, and societal limits on computing. These topics are seldom discussed in contemporary computing research. A key aim of the workshop is to promote innovative, concrete research, potentially of an interdisciplinary nature, that focuses on technologies, critiques, techniques, and contexts for computing within fundamental economic and ecological limits. A longer-term goal is to build a community around relevant topics and research. We hope to impact society through the design and development of computing systems in the abundant present for use in a future of limits. This year we are colocating for the first time with ICT4S.

IMPORTANT DATES

Abstract registration deadline: Feb 2, 2018, 11:59pm Pacific Time
Paper submission deadline: Feb 9, 2018, 11:59pm Pacific Time
Paper reviews available: March 7, 2018

CSHPS Annual Conference

May 26 2018 to May 28 2018 | Regina, Saskatchewan

Deadline: January 12 2018

http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/meeting.html

Updated: November 21 2017

Congrès annuel de la SCHPS Regina

[La version française suit]

The Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science (CSHPS) is holding its annual conference as part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Regina, Saskatchewan, May 26-28, 2018 (http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/meeting.html).

The Program Committee invites scholars working on the history and philosophy of science to submit abstracts for individual papers or proposals for sessions (3 and 4 papers). We particularly encourage scholars to engage with the theme for Congress 2018 – “Gathering diversities”. Unrelated topics and themes are also welcome. Meeting languages: The CSHPS is a bilingual society. Individual papers may be given in English or French, but efforts to broaden participation are appreciated (e.g. a presentation in English could be accompanied by a PowerPoint in French, and vice versa). Similarly, sessions can be presented in either English or French, but bilingual sessions are especially welcomed. Joint sessions: The CSHPS meeting overlaps with the meeting dates of a number of other member societies of the CFHSS, including the Canadian Historical Association, Women’s and Gender Studies et Recherches Féministes, and Canadian Society for the History of Medicine.

We welcome proposals for joint sessions with these and other societies (please mention this specifically in your session proposal). However, no talk will be accepted for presentation at more than one society. Number of submissions: Individuals can only submit one abstract for the CSHPS meeting (i.e. either an abstract for an individual paper or an abstract part of a session proposal). Submissions In order to preserve the anonymity of authors, it is important that contact information and other identifying information be excluded from the file containing the abstract. Individual paper submissions should consist of a title, a brief abstract (150-250 words), a list of keywords, and—in the accompanying email—the author’s name and contact information. Session proposals should consist of a session title, titles and brief abstracts (150-250 words) for each paper, a list of keywords, and—in the accompanying email—the names and contact information of the presenters and session organizer. Proposals should be in MS Word, pdf, odt or rtf format. Deadline: January 12th, 2018 Submission email address: program.cshps@gmail.com Presenters: All presenters must be members of the CSHPS at the time of the meeting. For more information about CSHPS membership, consult: http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/join.html. Student Prize: The CSHPS offers the Richard Hadden Award, a book prize for the best student paper presented at the meeting. To be considered for the award, students should submit a copy of their paper by e-mail by May 4th, 2018. Details of this prize can be found at: http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/HaddenPrize.html CFHSS: Information about Congress registration and accommodation will be available at the CFHSS congress website: http://congress2018.ca.

Program Committee (2017-2018): François Claveau (Sherbrooke) Chair, Vivien Hamilton (Harvey Mudd College), Jennifer Hubbard (Ryerson) Local Arrangements: Yvonne Petry (Regina)

La Société canadienne d'histoire et de philosophie des sciences (SCHPS) tiendra son congrès annuel dans le cadre du Congrès des sciences humaines, Regina, Saskatchewan, 26-28 mai 2018 (http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/meeting_fr.html).

Le comité de programme invite les historiens et philosophes des sciences à soumettre un résumé pour une communication individuelle ou une proposition de séance pour le congrès. Les propositions de séances pour 3 ou 4 communications seront particulièrement bienvenues. Nous sommes notamment à la recherche de contributions sur le thème du Congrès des sciences humaines 2018, « Diversités convergentes ». Les contributions qui ne sont pas liées à ce thème seront également considérées.

Langues du congrès : La SCHPS est une société bilingue. Les communications individuelles peuvent être en français ou en anglais, mais les efforts pour faciliter une participation diversifiée sont encouragés (par exemple, une communication en français accompagnée d’une présentation PowerPoint en anglais, ou vice-versa). De façon similaire, les séances peuvent être en anglais ou en français, mais les sessions bilingues sont particulièrement appréciées. Séances conjointes : Le congrès de la SCHPS se déroule en même temps que ceux de plusieurs autres sociétés membres de la FCSH, comme la Société historique du Canada, Women’s and Gender Studies et Recherches féministes, et la Société canadienne d’histoire de la médecine. Nous encourageons les propositions de séances conjointes avec d’autres sociétés (merci de bien préciser cela dans votre proposition). Cependant, aucune communication ne peut être présentée à plus d’une société. Nombre de soumissions : Une personne ne peut soumettre qu’un résumé de communication (c.-à-d. soit pour une communication individuelle soit pour une communication faisant partie d’une séance). Soumissions Afin de préserver l’anonymat des auteurs, aucune coordonnée personnelle ne doit être incluse dans le fichier contenant une proposition de communication. Les propositions de communication individuelle doivent comprendre un titre, un résumé (entre 150 et 250 mots), une liste de mots clés, et, dans le courriel les accompagnant, les coordonnées de l’auteur. Les propositions de séance doivent comprendre le titre de la séance, les titres et résumés (entre 150 et 250 mots) de chaque contribution, une liste de mots clés, et, dans le courriel les accompagnant, les noms et coordonnées des auteurs et de l’organisateur de la séance. Les propositions doivent être soumises dans des fichiers de format MS Word, pdf, odt ou rtf. Date limite de soumission: 12 janvier 2018. Adresse courriel pour les soumissions: program.cshps@gmail.com Présentateurs : Tous les présentateurs doivent être membres de la SCHPS au moment du congrès. Pour plus d’information sur l’inscription à la SCHPS, consulter le site: http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/join_fr.html. Prix étudiant: La SCHPS décerne le prix Richard Hadden pour le meilleur texte étudiant présenté lors du congrès. Les candidats qui souhaitent concourir devront envoyer par courriel une copie de leur article avant le 4 mai 2018. Pour plus d’information sur le prix, voir: http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/HaddenPrize_fr.html Les informations concernant l’inscription et les possibilités d’hébergement pour le congrès se trouveront sur le site Internet du congrès de la FCSH: http://congres2018.ca/.

Comité de programme (2017-2018) : François Claveau (Sherbrooke) président, Vivien Hamilton (Harvey Mudd College), Jennifer Hubbard (Ryerson) Organisation locale: Yvonne Petry (Regina)

Call for Papers: DASTS Biennial Conference Theme: Engaging ‘the Data Moment’

May 24 2018 to May 25 2018 | IT University of Copenhagen

Deadline: February 01 2018

http://www.dasts.dk/?p=3167

Updated: November 21 2017

Our contemporary moment is increasingly characterized by and through data. Imaginaries run wild; data is the new oil, the new currency, our new vehicle of growth, even. From quantified-self movements, to newly emerging forms of economics (such as bit coin and platform capitalism), to sensing-based environments (the internet of things), to the Janus-faced potentials of data analytics, data continues to proliferate, and in the process, transform people, organisations and societies. Given the speculative and hype infused conjuncture we find ourselves in, this conference encourages an engagement with the making and unmaking, potentials and pitfalls, of data, in all its various nomenclatures, guises and manifestations – data work, data practices, data imaginaries, models and infrastructures, and so forth. The so-called ‘data moment’ poses compelling empirical, theoretical and ethical challenges and is an opportunity to take stock of how STS might engage, and think with, data. One move is to rethink data through STS’s long history of engagement with, for example, classification and quantification, as well as the making of data in the sciences and beyond. At the same time, STS’s more recent foray into the arenas of Big-data, algorithms, machine-learning, as well as a host of state and governance issues relating to data citizenship, rights, and privacy, opens up fertile grounds for new forms of analysis, critique and intervention. Reflexively, how might we think about the making of research ‘data’ in STS vis-à-vis the various data producing, data defining activities studied by STS-scholars? The theme is inspirational only, and we welcome papers which address other issues, forms of analysis and concerns related to STS and neighbouring academic fields. We also hold open a space for alternatives to paper presentation sessions, so please feel free to submit abstracts that reflect this or contact us about your idea.

Important Information - nAbstracts should be submitted to jmag@itu.dk no later than February 1st - nNotification of acceptance by March 1st - bAbstracts should be no longer than 300 words and contain the name(s) and institutional. affiliation(s) of the author(s). They should also include a selection of 1-5 keywords. - Abstracts can be submitted in either English or Danish. - Registration details will be posted on DASTS.dk closer to the conference date . Keynote speakers

Amade M’charek is Professor Anthropology of Science at the department of Anthropology of the University of Amsterdam. Her research interests are in forensics, forensic anthropology and race. She is the PI of the project Dutchness in Genes and Genealogy, a project examining how Dutchness is enacted in collaborations between population geneticists, archaeologists and genealogists. Amade is also the PI of the project Sexuality & Diversity in the Making. She is the founding chair of the European Network for the Social Studies of Forensics (EUnetSSF) and the convenor of the seminar series Ir/relevance of Race in Science and Society. Her most recent research is on face making and race making in forensic identification, for which she received a five-year ERC consolidator grant in December 2013. Alberto Corsín Jiménez is Associate Professor at the Spanish National Research Council, and an anthropologist of cities and science. With an interest in the history and ethnography of science and experimentation he has been drawn to the study of ‘interfaces’, understood as technical and experimental designs between nature and culture. For the past ten years he has been studying the work of “free culture” urban activism and is interested in how such expressions of “free urbanism” compare with other accounts of informality in the city (auto-construction, makeshift urbanism, slum urbanism, etc.), as well as in the socio-technical assemblages through which such free and open-source prototype projects problematize anew forms of urban complexity.

Fellowships at Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC), Stanford University

Deadline: January 15 2018

http://cisac.fsi.stanford.edu/content/applying-cisac-fellowship

Updated: November 16 2017

Program Overview

CISAC Fellows spend the academic year engaged in research and writing, and are encouraged to participate in seminars and to interact and collaborate with leading faculty and researchers. Natural scientists have the opportunity to conduct research on the scientific and technical aspects of security topics, as well as to work in collaboration with faculty members. The Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) provides an unparalleled opportunity for scholars and professionals to explore complex international problems and innovative solutions in a collegial and collaborative environment.

Areas Of Research

CISAC fellows may focus on any of the following topics:
- Nuclear weapons and nonproliferation
- Nuclear energy
- Cybersecurity and the future of the Internet
- Biosecurity and global health
- Terrorism, and homeland security
- Domestic and international conflict and post-conflict environments
- Global governance and cooperation
- Other topics related to international security are considered on a case by case basis

Fellowship Opportunities

CISAC offers numerous fellowships. Applicants will be considered for all fellowships for which they are deemed eligible. Current fellowship opportunities include:
- Social Sciences or Humanities International Security Fellowship
- Natural Sciences or Engineering International Security Fellowship
- Cybersecurity and International Security Fellowship
- Nuclear Security Fellowship (Sponsored by Stanton and MacArthur Foundations)

Program Requirements

- Meet with your faculty mentor at least twice per month to review and refine your research topic, discuss project progress, and receive general career and intellectual guidance. Except in exceptional cases, these meetings should begin very shortly after your arrival. We also ask that you complete an Individual Development Plan and review it with your mentor within the first month of your appointment.
- Make tangible progress toward completing your dissertation in the form of several completed chapters.
- Participate in the Fellows’ Policy Workshop (typically 2-3 sessions per month).
- Regularly attend and present your research at one of CISAC’s weekly seminars.
- Participate in our winter quarter simulation for the course “International Security in a Changing World” if selected.
- Produce at least one policy relevant document as preparation for a mock congressional testimony, press briefing, or interagency meeting (to be presented during the Fellows’ Policy Workshop series).
- Publish a short op-ed, blog post, or other media piece that provides insights gleaned from your scholarly work to the public.
- Write brief, quarterly fellowship reports in which you describe your research, writing, and presentation activities during that period. (These are for our grant reports to funders.)

Assistant/Associate Professor in Intersectional Surveillance Studies, Queen’s University, Canada

Deadline: December 15 2017

http://www.queensu.ca/sociology/sites/webpublish.queensu.ca.doswww/files/files/QNS%20advertisement%202017.pdf

Updated: November 15 2017

The Department of Sociology at Queen’s University invites applications for a Queen's National Scholar (QNS - http://queensu.ca/vpr/prizes-awards/queens-national-scholars) position at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor with a specialization in Intersectional Surveillance Studies with an emphasis on Big Data and Social Inequality. The successful candidate is expected to teach undergraduate and graduate level courses in surveillance studies and contemporary critical theories (e.g. feminist theory, post-colonial theory, queer theory, critical theory). This is a tenured or tenure-track position with a preferred starting date of July 1, 2018. Further information on the Queen’s National Scholar Program can be found on the website of the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) (http://queensu.ca/vpr/prizes-awards/queens-national-scholars).

Candidates must have a PhD in Sociology or a related discipline completed or near completion at the start date of the appointment. The main criteria for selection are academic and teaching excellence. The successful candidate will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research leading to peer assessed publications and the securing of external research funding, as well as strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and an ongoing commitment to academic and pedagogical excellence in support of the department’s programs. Candidates must provide evidence of an ability to work collaboratively in an interdisciplinary and student-centered environment. The successful candidate will be required to make substantive contributions through service to the department, the Faculty, the University, and/or the broader community. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The Queen’s National Scholar Program expects that the successful candidate will demonstrate their ability to provide a rich and rewarding learning experience to all their students, and to develop a research program that aligns well with the University’s priorities. Further information on teaching and research priorities at Queen’s is available in the Queen’s Academic Plan (http://www.queensu.ca/strategicplanning/academic), and the Queen’s Strategic Research Plan (http://www.queensu.ca/strategicplanning/research).

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority.

To comply with federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information as to how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship; however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

A complete application consists of:
- a cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);
- a current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications);
- a writing sample;
- a statement of research interests;
- a statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching outlines and evaluations if available); and,
- three letters of reference to be sent directly by the referees to Dr. Annette Burfoot, Department Head at schulerw@queensu.ca.

The deadline for applications is December 15, 2017. Applicants must send all documents in their application packages electronically as PDFs to Ms. Wendy Schuler at schulerw@queensu.ca addressed to:

Dr. Annette Burfoot
Department Head
The Department of Sociology
Queen’s University
Kingston, Ontario
CANADA K7L 3N6

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Ms. Wendy Schuler in The Department of Sociology, at schulerw@queensu.ca.

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/collective-agreement and at http://www.qufa.ca.

Appointments are subject to review and final approval by the Principal. Candidates holding an existing tenure-track or continuing-adjunct appointment at Queen’s will not be considered.

Lecturer in Computing and Information Science, Cornell University

Deadline: December 01 2017

https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/10025

Updated: November 15 2017

The college of Computing and Information Science (CIS) at Cornell University invites applications for a full time Lecturer position focused on teaching innovation and excellence, to be hired in one of its three academic departments-Computer Science, Information Science or Statistical Science. Information about CIS and these departments can be found at http://cis.cornell.edu. The position offers a professional career track with possibility of growth: a three year (Lecturer) or five year (Senior Lecturer) appointment, depending on candidate qualifications, with the expectation of renewal.

We seek candidates to take a lead in developing innovative and effective teaching methods for CIS faculty in partnership with university teaching excellence programs. We expect that candidates will also teach, work with, and advise students in one or more of our undergraduate programs. Candidates for the position should hold a PhD and have demonstrated excellence in teaching CIS related undergraduate courses. Candidates holding a Masters who have shown exceptional teaching ability will also be considered.

CIS has as its foundation an outward-looking inter-disciplinary approach to computing and information, from a faculty that is grounded in core excellence within academic disciplines in its three departments. Computer Science brings together faculty, students and researchers in a broad range of interests including AI/machine learning, data science, graphics, human interaction cyber-security, scientific computing, systems/networks and theory. Information Science advances understanding of how people and society interact with computing and information. Statistical Science research and teaching includes statistical theory, statistical computing, data science or general methodology.

Evaluation of applicants will begin December 1, 2017. To ensure full consideration, applications should be received by January 1, 2018, but will be accepted until the position is filled.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae with a teaching statement including evidence of their teaching abilities and background with innovative teaching methodologies, and arrange for three letters of reference directed towards their teaching performance to be submitted electronically.

Application materials must be submitted at: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/10025

CIS Cornell University is located in Ithaca, New York, a city of about 30,000 people in the heart of the Finger Lakes region. Both Cornell and Ithaca offer a wide range of cultural activities, sports, and outdoor activities with the pleasures of both city and country close at hand.

Diversity and inclusion are a part of Cornell University’s heritage. We are a recognized employer and educator valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities.

2018 Call for post-doctoral positions, IFRIS (France)

Deadline: February 05 2018

http://ifris.org/actualites/2018-call-for-ifris-post-doctoral-positions/

Updated: November 15 2017

Seven (7) post-doctoral positions are available at the Institute for Research and Innovation in Society. IFRIS (http://ifris.org/) welcomes science, technology and society scholars in all social science disciplines: history, sociology, political sciences, anthropology, economics, management sciences or law.

STS is understood in a broad sense of issues related to the production and use of science and technologies in societies. The post-doc candidates should propose original research projects on specific issues that relate to public health, biomedicine, agricultural sciences, food security, climate change, biodiversity, environmental questions, ICT, “big data” and internet, historical and social construction of technologies, risk and regulation, development and research policies, global distribution of knowledge, intellectual and property rights and global commons, circulation of knowledge, construction of public research policies, multilevel governance of science and technology, knowledge and local development, regimes of regulations and production of sciences and innovation in society.

See the list of projects funded by IFRIS to date (http://ifris.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2017/11/Post-doctorates-funded-by-IFRIS.pdf) for your information.

Selected candidates will be attached to one of the following IFRIS research units (name and acronym are followed by the scientific organisation to which the unit is attached). See the website links for more details on these units.

- Centre Alexandre Koyré (CAK - http://koyre.ehess.fr/), CNRS, EHESS, Muséum
- Centre Population et développement (CEPED - http://ceped.org/), IRD, Université Paris Descartes
- Centre d’Economie de Paris Nord (CEPN - https://www.univ-paris13.fr/Tout/cepn/), Université Paris 13, CNRS
- Centre de recherche médecine, sciences, santé, santé mentale, société (CERMES3 - http://www.cermes3.cnrs.fr/fr/), CNRS, INSERM, EHESS, Université Paris Descartes
- Histoire des Technosciences en Société (HT2S - http://technique-societe.cnam.fr/), CNAM
- Laboratoire Techniques, Territoires, Sociétés (LATTS - https://latts.fr/), UPEM, Ecole des Ponts, CNRS
- Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire pour la Sociologie Economique (LISE - http://lise-cnrs.cnam.fr/), CNAM
- Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Sciences Innovations Sociétés (LISIS - http://umr-lisis.fr/), CNRS, ESIEE, INRA, UPEM Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Recherche en Science de l’Action (LIRSA - http://lirsa.cnam.fr/), CNAM
- Patrimoines locaux et gouvernance (PALOC - http://www.paloc.fr/index.php/en/), IRD, MNHN

Candidates do not need to have previous knowledge of these research groups. Nonetheless, it might be useful for them to consult their websites or take contacts that might help them designing their research project. Contacts can be made through the IFRIS Secretariat: rust[at]ifris.org

Selected candidates are eligible for a 24-month contract, under the French standard in relation to salary and work status. Contracts will start as soon as possible after selection, according to candidates’ previous obligations and engagements, and on January 1st, 2019 at the latest.
Requirements

To be eligible, post-doc candidates should hold a Ph.D. or doctoral degree as on the date of December 15th, 2018 at the latest and should have already fulfilled all the obligations for the acquisition of their Ph.D. or doctoral degree. In case the candidate do not have their degree by the date of this submission, he/she should present a reference letter from their doctoral supervisor certifying that he/she will hold his/her Ph.D. or doctoral degree as on the date of December 15th, 2018 at the latest.

If an applicant is selected but does not meet the deadline – December 15th – to obtain his/her PhD, he/she will loose the benefit of his/her selection. Candidates cannot apply for a post-doc position within a research group where they have prepared their doctoral research work.

Applications

Candidates should fill out the online form by clicking on the following link and send their research proposals by February 5th, 2018, consisting of:

- A cover letter written by the candidate to indicate the way she/he believes her/ his project contributes to IFRIS research agenda. The candidate should indicate her/his former relations to IFRIS research units, in case they exist. Candidates are not requested to indicate in which IFRIS research unit they would like to be hosted, but nevertheless can do so.
- A one page Curriculum Vitae. The Vitae should indicate diplomas, trajectory, places and institutions where the candidate has worked and studied. Previous post-docs should be indicated in case there has been any.
- A research project (no more than 8 pages). The project should be written in English, including a plan of activities for the whole 24-month period and a tentative budget. The project should clearly state its objective, methodology, theoretical position, type and mode of collection of empirical material, research strategy, and expected outcomes. It should also indicate the type of expected production out of this period of time (workshops, book, articles, or any other envisioned material).
- A complete list of publications.
I- n case the candidate do not have their degree by the date of this submission, he/she should present a reference letter from their doctoral supervisor certifying that he/she will hold his/her Ph.D. or doctoral degree as on the date of December 15th, 2018 at the latest. For the French candidates, their viva report is also required (“rapport de soutenance”).

Selection criteria

- Quality of the research project
- Relevance in relation to IFRIS agenda
- Potential of the topic to favour the integration of the candidate to the hosting research group
- Quality of the candidate’s academic and research trajectory

The application will be sent in one single file, pdf format, and should be saved under the following name:
Name_appelpostdoc_IFRIS.pdf (where “name” is the last name of the candidate)

To IFRIS Secretariat: rust[at]ifris.org

Deadline: February 5th, 2018. Successful candidates will be notified by May 30th, 2018.

Postdoc in societal aspects of new digital technologies, Arizona State University

Deadline: December 01 2017

Updated: November 15 2017

The School for the Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS) at Arizona State University invites applications for a POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATE in the societal aspects of new digital technologies. Start date is flexible, with first anticipated start date 2 January 2018.

The postdoctoral research associate is expected to collaborate closely with the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering (FSE) in a study of the use of new digital devices by FSE students in their dorms. S/he should also have a scholarly agenda beyond this assignment that complements the ongoing scholarship, education and engagement activities performed at SFIS and its companion Institute for the Future of Innovation in Society.

The fellowship is available for one year and renewable for up to one additional year, contingent upon satisfactory performance, availability of funding, and the needs of the university.

Required qualifications for the post-doctoral fellowship include: a doctorate in science and technology studies (STS), anthropology, or a related area by the time of appointment; demonstrated skills in conducting ethnography of people’s interactions with technologies, particularly digital devices; interest in the societal aspects of scientific and technological advance in general and emerging technologies and publics in particular; and evidence of high achievement in research. Applicants must be within five years of receipt of their doctoral degree to be considered eligible for this position.

Desired qualifications include interest and/or experience in: working in cross-disciplinary teams including scientists, engineers, social scientists, humanists and artists; public engagement and deliberation activities; evident teaching skills, particularly in an online environment.

To apply, please submit as one pdf document a detailed letter of application stating qualifications, experience, research plans, and teaching interests; curriculum vitae; and the names and contact information of three references to: Lorri Gums (lorri.gums@asu.edu). Initial review of applications will begin on Friday December 1, 2017 and continue every week thereafter until the search is closed. A background check is required for employment.

As the newest element of ASU’s approach to building a “New American University” (http://newamericanuniversity.asu.edu/), SFIS (http://sfis.asu.edu) provides robust opportunities for intellectual fusion, use-inspired research, and global engagement via ongoing projects and centers. SFIS hosts a variety of degrees including a Ph.D. in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology, a Master of Science and Technology Policy, and a Master of Science in Global Technology and Development, as well as an undergraduate major, minor and certificate in Innovation in Society. Research is coordinated through the Institute for the Future of Innovation in Society (http://ifis.asu.edu).

Arizona State University is a new model for American higher education, an unprecedented combination of academic excellence, entrepreneurial energy and broad access. This New American University is a single, unified institution comprising four differentiated campuses positively impacting the economic, social, cultural, and environmental health of the communities it serves. Its research is inspired by real world application blurring the boundaries that traditionally separate academic disciplines. ASU serves more than 70,000 students in metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, the nation’s sixth largest city. ASU champions intellectual and cultural diversity, and welcomes students from all fifty states and more than one hundred nations across the globe.

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. https://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/

Research Opportunities at the Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center

Deadline: December 01 2017

Updated: November 14 2017

Through its fellowships and travel grants, the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation supports research projects that present creative approaches to the study of invention and innovation in American society. Projects may include (but are not limited to) historical research and documentation projects resulting in dissertations, publications, exhibitions, educational initiatives, documentary films, or other multimedia products.

Our programs provide access to the expertise of the Institution's research staff (http://americanhistory.si.edu/about/staff) and the vast invention and technology collections of the National Museum of American History (NMAH). The NMAH Archives Center (http://americanhistory.si.edu/archives/collections) documents both individuals and firms across a range of time periods and subject areas. Representative collections include the Western Union Telegraph Company Records, ca. 1840-1994 and the Earl S. Tupper Papers, documenting Tupper, and his invention, Tupperware. In addition, the NMAH Library offers long runs of historical technology serials like Scientific American and American Machinist, and the American Trade Literature collection (http://library.si.edu/trade-literature), which includes 300,000 catalogs, technical manuals, and advertising brochures for some 30,000 firms, primarily from 1880-1945. For a comprehensive catalog of objects, manuscripts, images and research materials available at the NMAH (and other Smithsonian units), see http://www.collections.si.edu/.

The Arthur Molella Distinguished Fellowship supports the work of an experienced author or senior scholar (at the associate/full professor level or equivalent) from the history of technology, science and technology studies, business history, museum studies, STEAM education, or an allied field. The specific arrangement is flexible: the Molella Fellow may use the funds as a sabbatical supplement; for several short-duration visits; for a single residency focused on research and writing; or for a series of lectures leading to a major publication. The stipend is $35,000. Funds may be used flexibly to support travel for several short-term visits, living expenses for longer residences up to six months, and related research expenses; dates are flexible. Applications are due December 1, 2017. For application procedures and additional information, see http://invention.si.edu/arthur-molella-distinguished-fellowship. Applicants may wish to consult with the fellowship coordinator before submitting a proposal – contact historian Eric S. Hintz, Ph.D. at +1 202-633-3734 or hintze@si.edu.

The Lemelson Center Fellowship Program annually awards 2 to 3 fellowships to pre-doctoral graduate students, post-doctoral and experienced scholars, and other professionals who have completed advanced training. Fellows are expected to reside in the Washington, D.C. area, to participate in the Center's activities, and to make a presentation of their work to colleagues at the museum. Fellowship tenure is based upon the applicants’ stated needs (and available funding) up to a maximum of ten weeks. Stipends will be $630/week for pre-doctoral fellows and $925/week for post-doctoral and professional fellows. Applications are due December 1, 2017. For application procedures and additional information, see http://invention.si.edu/lemelson-center-fellowship-program. Researchers may wish to consult with the fellowship coordinator before submitting a proposal – contact historian Eric S. Hintz, Ph.D. at +1 202-633-3734 or hintze@si.edu.

The Lemelson Center Travel to Collections Award Program annually awards 3 to 4 short-term travel grants to encourage the use of its invention-related collections. Awards are $150 per day for a maximum of 10 business days and may be used to cover transportation, living, and reproduction expenses; they are intended only for applicants who reside or attend school beyond commuting distance of the NMAH. Applications are due December 1, 2017. See http://invention.si.edu/lemelson-center-travel-collections-awards for application procedures and additional information. Researchers may wish to consult with the travel award coordinator before submitting a proposal – contact archivist Alison Oswald at +1 202-633-3726 or oswalda@si.edu

Lecturer in Sociology (Education & Research), University of Exeter

Deadline: December 11 2017

https://jobs.exeter.ac.uk/hrpr_webrecruitment/wrd/run/ETREC107GF.open?VACANCY_ID=600249KApZ&WVID=3817591jNg&LANG=USA

Updated: November 09 2017

The salary will be £34,520 - £42,418 per annum on Grade F for Lecturers subject to knowledge, skills and experience.

Generous holiday allowances, flexible working, pension scheme and relocation package (if applicable).

Applications are invited from candidates with teaching and research interests in any area of Sociology, though particular consideration will be given to candidates working in Cultural Sociology, Science and Technology Studies, or Health and Well-being. In addition to the potential to publish in leading journals and secure research funding, it is expected that you will play a leading role in the development and delivery of the Department's Sociology curriculum across core and optional modules, including sociological theory and methods.

You will hold a PhD in Sociology or a closely related discipline and have an independent, internationally-recognised research programme.

You will be joining an interdisciplinary Department that has an outstanding international reputation. SPA was submitted to the Sociology review panel in the 2014 REF, and placed 4th nationally (when power is taken into account; 100% of research staff were submitted). This is a testament to the Department's vibrant and strongly inter- and trans-disciplinary research culture.

Applicants will be able to demonstrate: a strong programme of research that has international recognition; a record in attracting research funding, or a potential to attract funding; an ability to work within an inter-disciplinary department and to develop research links across specialisms; a willingness to engage in continuous professional development; the ability to develop and use a variety of strategies to promote and assess learning; a commitment to delivering the Department's undergraduate and postgraduate programmes; and enthusiasm for the supervision of research students.

This full-time post is expected to be available from 1 September 2018 on a permanent basis.

What we can offer you
-Freedom (and the support) to pursue your intellectual interests and to work creatively across disciplines to produce internationally exciting research;
-Support teams that understand the University wide research and teaching goals and partner with our academics accordingly
-An Innovation, Impact and Business directorate that works closely with our academics providing specialist support for external engagement and development
-Our Exeter Academic initiative supporting high performing academics to achieve their potential and develop their career
-A beautiful campus set in the heart of stunning Devon.

The University of Exeter is a Russell Group university that combines world-class research with very high levels of student satisfaction. Exeter has over 21,000 students from more than 130 different countries and is in the top 1% of universities in the world with 98% of its research rated as being of international quality. Our research focuses on some of the most fundamental issues facing humankind today.

For further information please contact Professor Mike Michael: m.michael@exeter.ac.uk

To view the Job Description and Person Specification document please click here: http://www.admin.ex.ac.uk/personnel/jobs/P59771.pdf

The University of Exeter is an equal opportunity employer which is 'Positive about Disabled People'. Whilst all applicants will be judged on merit alone, we particularly welcome applications from groups currently underrepresented in the workforce.

New Book from Susan Merrill Squier, Epigenetic Landscapes (Duke University Press, 2017)

https://www.dukeupress.edu/epigenetic-landscapes

Updated: November 09 2017

Description
Devised in the 1940s by the biologist C. H. Waddington, the epigenetic landscape is a metaphor for how gene regulation modulates cellular development. As a scientific model, it fell out of use in the late 1960s but returned at the beginning of the twenty-first century with the advent of big-data genomic research because of its utility among scientists across the life sciences to think more creatively about and to discuss genetics. In Epigenetic Landscapes Susan Merrill Squier follows the model’s cultural trail, from its first visualization by the artist John Piper to its use beyond science. Squier examines three cases in which the metaphor has been imaginatively deployed to illustrate complex systems that link scientific and cultural practices: graphic medicine, landscape architecture, and bioArt. Challenging reductive understandings of epigenetics, Squier boldly reclaims the broader significance of the epigenetic landscape as a figure at the nexus of art, design, and science.

About The Author(s)
Susan Merrill Squier is Brill Professor Emerita of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and English at Pennsylvania State University. Her many books include Communities of the Air: Radio Century, Radio Culture and Liminal Lives: Imagining the Human at the Frontiers of Biomedicine, both also published by Duke University Press; Poultry Science, Chicken Culture: A Partial Alphabet; and, as coauthor, Graphic Medicine Manifesto.

Berggruen Fellowship, The Transformation of the Human, University of Southern California (USC)

Deadline: January 05 2018

https://usccareers.usc.edu/job/los-angeles/usc-berggruen-fellow-the-transformation-of-the-human/1209/6145589

Updated: November 06 2017

Fellowship Seeks Innovative Thinkers

USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and the Berggruen Institute will sponsor up to five (5) fellowships at the University of Southern California for the academic year 2018-2019. The selected USC Berggruen Fellows will work on the topic area of “The Transformation of the Human”:

New technologies are changing how we understand ourselves as individuals, in relationships, and as a species. Humans have historically defined themselves by contrast to machines and animals, by having language and intelligence, and by the idea of a soul. Just as earlier changes such as the evolution of language, literacy, and better nutrition changed what it means to be human, so are new technologies changing our material realities and thus destabilizing old definitions of the human. We are interested, for example, in artificial intelligence and gene editing, as well as developments in neuroscience, bio-engineering, and interventions into the human microbiome. At the same time, we recognize that changing social and cultural norms are part of the process of redefining of the human, not least as different civilizational traditions inform and challenge each other.

USC Berggruen Fellows need not be academics, but they must be committed to intellectual work of the highest quality. We seek academics with an existing appointment (most likely for a sabbatical year). We also seek intellectuals without an existing academic appointment, for whom the Berggruen Fellowship may serve as a retreat from work in industry, government, or the arts. Applicants should have a terminal degree or commensurate research expertise in appropriate field of study.

USC Berggruen Fellows will be provided with an office in the Downtown Los Angeles headquarters of the Berggruen Institute, and will have access to the scholarly resources of the University of Southern California. They will also participate in a working group focused on the theme of the transformation of the human. Fellows with academic appointments will be paid half of their annual academic year salary, up to $75,000 with the expectation that their home institution will make up the remainder. Fellows without sabbatical half-salary or a similar particle remuneration package can be paid up to $90,000, depending on position and seniority.

Founded in 2010, Berggruen Institute’s mission is to develop new ideas for shaping social and political institutions in the current era of Great Transformations. We study these transformations not only by looking at how new technologies are remaking the world, but also by considering cultural and religious shifts, upheavals in politics and efforts to reform governance, changes to the structures of economic organization, and environmental change. And we consider the scales of changes at everything from the level of human beings themselves; to social groups and other forms of collective identity; to human interaction on a planetary scale.

To Apply

In order to be considered for this position, all candidates must apply via the "Apply" link at the top or bottom of this page. Please upload the following materials:

I. Full curriculum vitae

II. Project Statement

Your project statement, up to 750 words, should answer two questions:

Question #1: What is your proposed project?

Concisely describe the work you plan to do during your fellowship years:

Explain the intellectual agenda of your project: what does the project imply for our thinking about the changing relation between technology and the human? What literatures or conversations is it most deeply engaged with? What is most innovative about the proposed work?
Address the public dimensions of this project: How will your project “make a difference”? How would you propose collaborating with the Berggruen Institute to raise public awareness of your topic and work?
Question #2: What is your most important work to date?

Identify your most important book, book chapter, or article and explain why it was important—how it corrected a misconception in the literature, how it advanced thinking in some important way, and/or how it filled in an important gap in knowledge.

III. Two reference letters

At least one letter should be from an expert in your area of interest.

IV. One writing sample

Please provide the link to one short writing sample, such as an article, essay, or book chapter.

The application deadline is January 5, 2018. Awardees will receive notification of their fellowships by mid-February, 2018. Inquires can be addressed to jb@berggruen.org .

USC is an equal-opportunity educator and employer, proudly pluralistic and firmly committed to providing equal opportunity for outstanding persons of every race, gender, creed and background. The University particularly encourages women, members of underrepresented groups, veterans and individuals with disabilities to apply. USC will make reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with known disabilities unless doing so would result in an undue hardship. Further information is available by contacting uschr@usc.edu .

2 tenure-track Assistant Professor positions in Communication, Simon Fraser University

Deadline: November 30 2017

http://www.sfu.ca/vpacademic/faculty_openings/cat.html

Updated: November 04 2017

1. News, Social Media, and Public Communication

Intersection of news, social media and public communication. Specific areas of focus may include but are not limited to political economy and governance of news production and distribution; the impact of social media on journalism and public communication; news, democracy and the public sphere; critical analysis of news discourse; independent media, ethnic media and alternative journalism; the influence of public relations and marketing on news media; data journalism; communication rights and access to information; media activism; studies of users, creators, and publics. We are searching for candidates who address these or other issues using qualitative, quantitative, media and news analysis that might include discourse and frame analysis, content analysis, ethnography, and computational or digital methods or a combination of approaches.

2. Big data
Area of big data in relation to theories and methodologies in the field of communication. Specific areas of focus may include but are not limited to social media, algorithmic culture, critical data studies, digital humanities, surveillance, critical artificial intelligence, platform studies, blockchain and crypto technologies, data visualization, infrastructure studies, quantified self, data politics, data ethics, privacy, and health. We are searching for candidates who address these or other issues using qualitative, quantitative, computational, digital methods or a combination of approaches.

Situated in the Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology, the School of Communication is a national and global leader in the discipline. The School is a dynamic site of research and teaching with a strategic focus on digital media and communication. Our critical tradition to the study of communication includes approaches such as media and culture, technology studies, global communication, culture industries and policy, history of communication, and applied media production, among others. The successful candidate will build on the School’s history of critical engagement while developing new directions in research and teaching to reflect contemporary and emergent issues of digital media and communication. We seek an innovative colleague who will challenge traditional distinctions between critical analysis and applied approaches.

Candidates are expected to have a completed Ph.D. (or Ph.D. near completion) in Communication or a cognate discipline, a record of teaching experience and excellence, a clear potential to contribute to the School’s research culture, and an emerging publication record appropriate to the position. The successful candidate will be expected to teach and supervise students at all undergraduate and graduate levels and to work with partners inside and outside the University.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply. However, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. Simon Fraser University is committed to employment equity and welcomes applications from all qualified women and men, including visible minorities, persons of aboriginal heritage, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ-identified persons.

Applications should include a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, a concise statement of research established and projected, a statement of teaching experience, performance and philosophy, and two writing samples. Please submit all documents in a single PDF file with bookmarks. In addition, three letters of reference should be sent under separate cover. Please direct all materials to:

Director, School of Communication
Simon Fraser University
8888 University Drive
Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6
c/o: bebaldwi@sfu.ca

Review of applications will begin on November 30th, 2017 and will continue until the position is filled.

These positions are subject to funding and final approval by the SFU Board of Governors. Under the authority of the University Act, personal information that is required by the University for academic appointment competitions will be collected. For further details, please see: http://www.sfu.ca/vpacademic/faculty_openings/collection_notice.html

Energy Justice in Global Perspective Postdoctoral Position, UC Santa Barbara

Deadline: December 18 2017

https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/apply/JPF01127

Updated: November 03 2017

The Global Studies department at the University of California, Santa Barbara invites applications for a Mellon Sawyer Seminar Postdoctoral Scholar on the theme of “energy justice in global perspective.” This seminar focuses on the ways in which certain communities are disproportionately affected by energy regimes and seeks to advance energy justice scholarship with the goal of analyzing and transforming, at this pivotal time, how decisions about energy development, production, and use are made. The Mellon Sawyer Seminar award is being managed by the Institute for Social, Behavioral and Economic Research.

The successful candidate will have a track record of research in energy justice that is interdisciplinary and global, and have plans for extending this research agenda. The Postdoctoral Scholar will also assist in all aspects of the organization of a year-long seminar that includes keynote speakers, roundtables, and public film screenings, and will work with two graduate students affiliated with the seminar. The Postdoctoral Scholar will be mentored by one of the UCSB faculty leading the seminar.

Requirements: Ph.D. in the humanities or interpretive sciences, including Native American and indigenous studies, ethnic studies, feminist studies, global studies, history, film and media studies, environmental studies, or related fields. Ph.D. must be awarded from an accredited university within the last five academic years. For Ph.D. candidates - degree must be awarded by the anticipated start date of July 1, 2018. Applicants with experience organizing and hosting academic events are particularly encouraged to apply.

This is a full time, 12-month appointment with an anticipated start date of July, 2018 or later. Postdoctoral Scholars are required to be in residence for the entirety of the 2018-2019 program. Sawyer Seminar organizers are especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, professional activity, and service. Primary consideration will be given to applications submitted by December 18, 2017. If a successful candidate isn't identified from the applications received by the primary consideration date, applications received after the primary consideration date will be reviewed. Questions about the position should be directed to Jana Bentley, jana.bentley@ucsb.edu.

Applications should be submitted via UC Recruit and should include:

-- Brief Cover letter
-- Curriculum vitae
-- Statement of Research (1,000 words maximum) summarizing the applicant's intellectual interests, scholarly training, research agenda, and relevant experience as these relate to our seminar's projected themes
-- A writing sample
-- Two letters of recommendation
--if applicant is ABD, one of these letters should be from the dissertation advisor indicating expected date of degree.

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Post-Doctoral Fellowship on the Plantationocene, 2018-2020, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Deadline: December 15 2017

https://www.nelson.wisc.edu/careers/details.php?j=6301

Updated: November 01 2017

The University of Wisconsin-Madison invites applications for a two-year postdoctoral fellowship on the Plantationocene sponsored by an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar grant.

In addition to pursuing her/his research, the Postdoctoral fellow will be in charge of administrating a seminar that will run from the spring of 2019 through the spring of 2020 working in collaboration with faculty seminar leaders (Monique Allewaert, Pablo Gómez, and Gregg Mitman). This seminar will gather scholars from a range of disciplines to explore and deepen the concept of the Plantationocene. We will attend to other recent ways of naming our epoch (Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene) and interrogate the past and present of plantations: their materialities; the economic, ecological, and political transformations they wrought; and their significance to the making of human bodies, capitalism, and land over the course of four centuries.

The fellow will also teach one class during the entire fellowship period in conjunction with the Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies and will be hosted by the Nelson Institute’s Center for Culture, History, and Environment. The position pays an annual salary rate of $55,000, plus fringe benefits, for two years starting August 20, 2018 and ending June 30, 2020. Applicants should have some background in STS, Environmental Humanities, and/or Political Ecology but might come from any relevant discipline (including Anthropology, History, Geography, Sociology, African and African American Studies, Diaspora Studies, Literary Criticism, American Studies).

https://www.nelson.wisc.edu/careers/details.php?j=6301

Applicants should submit the following electronically to the address shown below by 12/15/2017:
- a cover letter;
- a c.v.;
- a writing sample (of 25 pages);
- a two-page research proposal that should include details about the following: the research project the candidate proposes to advance during her/his time at UW; the departments/programs with which the candidate’s work best intersects; and, different types of classes s/he envisions teaching in conjunction with the Holtz Center;
- names and contact information for three referees.

Documentation that all requirements for the doctorate have been met or will be met by the start date of the appointment.

Submit all materials electronically to:
Lynn West
Assistant Director for Administration
Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies
hr@nelson.wisc.edu

New Book: Meloni et al., The Palgrave Handbook of Biology and Society (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)

https://link.springer.com/book/10.1057%2F978-1-137-52879-7

Updated: November 01 2017

Meloni, M., J. Cromby, D. Fitzgerald, and S. Lloyd (2017) The Palgrave Handbook of Biology and Society. Palgrave Macmillan: New York and London. pp. 926

This comprehensive handbook synthesizes the often-fractured relationship between the study of biology and the study of society. Bringing together a compelling array of interdisciplinary contributions, the authors demonstrate how nuanced attention to both the biological and social sciences opens up novel perspectives upon some of the most significant sociological, anthropological, philosophical and biological questions of our era.

The six sections cover topics ranging from genomics and epigenetics, to neuroscience and psychology to social epidemiology and medicine. The authors collaboratively present state-of-the-art research and perspectives in some of the most intriguing areas of what can be called biosocial and biocultural approaches, demonstrating how quickly we are moving beyond the acrimonious debates that characterized the border between biology and society for most of the twentieth century.

This landmark volume will be an extremely valuable resource for scholars and practitioners in all areas of the social and biological sciences.

IEEE History Center Life Member Internship, 2018

Deadline: March 01 2018

https://www.ieee.org/about/history_center/internship.html

Updated: October 30 2017

Scholars early in their career studying the history of electrical technology and computing are invited to contact the Center to be considered for a paid Internship at the Center's offices on the Stevens Institute of Technology campus in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA. The IEEE History Center, a center for the public history of technology, is cosponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE)—the world’s largest professional technical society—and Stevens Institute of Technology.

The intern program seeks to provide research experience for graduate students and other young scholars in the history of electrical and computer sciences and technologies and related fields, while enlisting the help of promising young scholars for the Center's projects. The Intern generally works full-time for two months at the History Center on a Center project that is connected to his or her own area of interest. This time is usually during the summer, but other arrangements will be considered. The stipend paid to the intern is US$5,000, but additional funds may be available to defray travel costs, depending on the intern’s circumstances. This internship is supported by the IEEE Life Members Committee, and the stipend was recently increased thanks to a generous gift from Emerson Pugh.

There is no formal application form. To apply, please mail curriculum vitae showing your studies in electrical history, a three- to five-page page (single or double spaced) writing sample, along with a cover letter describing the sort of project you would be interested in doing (see contact information below). The deadline for contacting the IEEE History Center is 1 March 2018. More details and contact information can be found at https://www.ieee.org/about/history_center/internship.html.

The IEEE Life Member Fellowship in the History of Electrical and Computing Technology, 2018-2019

Deadline: February 01 2018

https://www.ieee.org/about/history_center/fellowship.html

Updated: October 30 2017

The IEEE Life Members Fellowship in the History of Electrical and Computing Technology supports either one year of full-time graduate work in the history of electrical or computer science or technology or a related field at a college or university of recognized standing, or up to one year of post-doctoral research for a scholar in this field who has received his or her Ph.D. within the past three years. This award is supported by the IEEE Life Members Committee and administered by the IEEE History Center. The stipend is $17,000, with a research budget of up to $3,000. Recipients are normally expected to take up the Fellowship in the July of the year that it is awarded. Fellowship checks are normally mailed to the Fellow quarterly in July, October, January, and April. For Fellows in the southern hemisphere who follow the southern hemisphere academic year, arrangements can be made to mail the checks in December (two quarters worth), March, and June.

Pre-doctoral fellows must pursue full-time graduate work and evidence of satisfactory academic performance is required. In addition, pre-doctoral recipients may not hold or subsequently receive other fellowships, but they may earn up to $5,000 for work that is directly related to their graduate studies. These restrictions do not apply to post-doctoral applicants.

The Fellow is selected on the basis of the candidate's potential for pursuing research in, and contributing to, the field of the history of technology. The deadline for completed applications for the 2018-2019 Fellowship year is 1 February 2018. More information, contact information, and an application form are available at: https://www.ieee.org/about/history_center/fellowship.html

New Book by Jennifer Terry, Attachments to War (Duke University Press, 2017)

https://www.dukeupress.edu/attachments-to-war

Updated: October 30 2017

In Attachments to War, Jennifer Terry traces how biomedical logics entangle Americans in a perpetual state of war. Focusing on the Afghanistan and Iraq wars between 2002 and 2014, Terry identifies the presence of a biomedicine-war nexus in which new forms of wounding provoke the continual development of complex treatment, rehabilitation, and prosthetic technologies. At the same time, the U.S. military rationalizes violence and military occupation as necessary conditions for advancing medical knowledge and saving lives. Terry examines the treatment of war-generated polytrauma, postinjury bionic prosthetics design, and the development of defenses against infectious pathogens, showing how the interdependence between war and biomedicine is interwoven with neoliberal ideals of freedom, democracy, and prosperity. She also outlines the ways in which military-sponsored biomedicine relies on racialized logics that devalue the lives of Afghan and Iraqi citizens and U.S. veterans of color. Uncovering the mechanisms that attach all Americans to war and highlighting their embeddedness and institutionalization in everyday life via the government, media, biotechnology, finance, and higher education, Terry helps lay the foundation for a more meaningful opposition to war.

About The Author(s)
Jennifer Terry is Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Irvine, the author of An American Obsession: Science, Medicine, and Homosexuality in Modern Society, and coeditor of Processed Lives: Gender and Technology in Everyday Life and Deviant Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Difference in Science and Popular Culture.

Assistant Professor in Environment and Race, University of South Carolina

Deadline: November 20 2017

https://uscjobs.sc.edu/postings/20441

Updated: October 25 2017

The School of the Earth, Ocean, and Environment invites applications for a tenure-track, assistant professor position to begin August 16, 2018. We seek an individual with outstanding research and teaching capabilities and interests that focus on the intersections of race and the environment. The area of specialization is open. Research interests may include, but are not limited to: environmental justice; race, nature, and landscape; diversity in environmental institutions; race and class in environmental movements; the intersections of social inequality and environmental conflict; race and conservation; and race and environmental imagery. We seek candidates whose scholarship is theoretically grounded and who can work across disciplinary boundaries to produce innovative research and teaching. Potential disciplinary backgrounds could include sociology, geography, anthropology, history, public policy, political science, environmental humanities, comparative literature, African American studies, American studies and related fields.

The successful candidate is expected to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in the School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment and to maintain an active research agenda. The School (http://www.seoe.sc.edu) is a multidisciplinary unit with a strong commitment to expanding its faculty in the areas of environmental social science and humanities. Potential collaborative interactions exist within the School and with other units across the University. Teaching responsibilities will include introductory courses that support interdisciplinary degrees in Environmental Studies and Environmental Science as well as upper-level undergraduate and graduate level courses related to the candidate’s specialty, with a standard teaching load of two courses per semester. Cross appointment with an appropriate unit is possible, depending on the candidate’s expertise. A Ph.D. is required at the time of appointment. Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vita, research statement and statement of teaching interests in a single pdf file and a list of contact information for three references through https://uscjobs.sc.edu/postings/20441. For more information please contact: Alicia Wilson, Environment & Race Search Committee Chair, School of the Earth, Ocean & Environment, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, awilson@seoe.sc.edu.

To ensure full consideration, applications and letters should be received by Nov 20, 2017. We will review files until a candidate is selected. The University of South Carolina is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer and is responsive to the needs of dual-career couples. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of South Carolina does not discriminate in educational or employment opportunities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender, age, disability, veteran status or genetics.

The School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment is a multidisciplinary unit of approximately 600 undergraduate students, more than 80 graduate students, and 32 faculty representing research areas ranging from Earth and Ocean Sciences to Environmental Policy and History. The University of South Carolina’s main campus in Columbia is a Carnegie “very high research activity” institution with over 34,000 students on the main campus, more than 450 academic programs, and the top Honors College in the United States. Columbia is a vibrant community with approximately 800,000 people across the greater metropolitan area. It is the home of state government, major corporate headquarters, diverse entertainment venues, a lively arts scene, and affordable neighborhoods.  Located in the middle of the state, Columbia provides easy access to South Carolina’s beautiful beaches and mountains.

Assistant Professors and Instructors in Global Sustainability, University of South Florida

http://www.usf.edu/work-at-usf/careers/

Updated: October 24 2017

Deadline: December 1 2017 & December 30 2017

Assistant Professor - Tenure Earning Multiple Positions
The Patel College of Global Sustainability at the University of South Florida is searching for innovative scholars, who want to work within an interdisciplinary team committed to addressing the social, economic and environmental challenges of local and global communities for achieving sustainable development that is just and equitable. The focus of teaching and research is in: Renewable Energy, Water, Climate Change, Food Security, Sustainable Enterprise & Innovation, Sustainability Policy, Sustainable Engineering, Sustainable Transportation, Sustainable Urbanization, Biodiversity, Coastal & Marine Ecosystems, Environment & Health, Earth System Modeling, and related fields.

Successful candidates will have a PhD (ABDs accepted PhD required by August 1, 2018) in an appropriate field related to global sustainability with a focus on at least two or more areas of global sustainability listed above from accredited reputable institutions with proven ability to work across disciplinary boundaries on innovative projects that move knowledge into practice. Completed application packet will include a cover letter, 3 letters of recommendation and updated academic CV. Review of applications will begin on December 1, 2017 and short-listed candidates will be invited to campus starting mid-January 2018. Appointments will be effective August 7, 2018.

Teaching/Instructors (Multiple Positions)
The Patel College of Global Sustainability at the University of South Florida is searching for highly-motivated full-time instructors to join an interdisciplinary core faculty. Instructors are sought in fields that include: Renewable Energy, Water, Climate Change, Food Security, Sustainable Enterprise & Innovation, Sustainability Policy, Sustainable Engineering, Sustainable Transportation, Sustainable Urbanization, Biodiversity, Coastal & Marine Ecosystems, Environment & Health, Earth System Modeling, and related fields. Demonstrated teaching experience at the graduate level with excellent teaching evaluations are required.

Successful candidates will have a PhD (ABDs accepted PhD required by August 1, 2018) in an appropriate field related to global sustainability with a focus on at least two or more areas of global sustainability listed above from accredited reputable institutions with proven ability to work across disciplinary boundaries on innovative projects that move knowledge into practice. Completed application packet will include a cover letter, 3 letters of recommendation and updated academic CV. Application due by December 30, 2017 and review of applications will begin shortly thereafter. Appointments will be effective August 7, 2018.

Salary and benefits for both positions are highly competitive, depending on experience and qualifications.

For more details for each position and how to apply, visit the website Careers@USF: http://www.usf.edu/work-at-usf/careers/

Postdocs in Adv Biomedical Ethics and Ethical/Legal/Social Implications of Genetics/Genomics, UPenn

Deadline: December 04 2017

Updated: October 16 2017

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine invites applications for two postdoctoral fellowships: the Fellowship in Advanced Biomedical Ethics, and the Program in the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of Genetics and Genomics. These fellowships seek to train scholars and future leaders in academic biomedical ethics and in ELSI research. Appointments will commence in Summer 2018.

Fellows will participate fully in the life of the Department, which is among the world’s leading centers of bioethics research and teaching. They will have full access to the intellectual resources of the Penn community.

Fellows will receive a generous annual stipend, benefits, and funds for academic books and travel. Depending on educational needs and career goals, fellows may also receive support to pursue a Master of Science in Medical Ethics (MSME) degree.

Applications are invited from scholars with doctoral degrees in hand, or who will have completed all requirements for their degree by June 2018. Eligible degrees include a PhD or equivalent, MD or equivalent, and (for Fellows in Advanced Biomedical Ethics only), a JD. Doctorates may be in any relevant field, including but not limited to philosophy, political science, life science, or any of the social sciences. Prior experience in bioethics is not required. Applicants who are members of underrepresented minority groups or who are disabled are strongly encouraged to apply.

Please visit http://medicalethicshealthpolicy.med.upenn.edu/advancedbioethics for more information about the Fellowship in Advanced Biomedical Ethics, or http://medicalethicshealthpolicy.med.upenn.edu/elsipostdoc for more information about the ELSI Fellowship. Application deadline is December 4, 2017.

For additional information, please contact Ms. Angela Golub, Administrative Coordinator, by email at ethxfell@upenn.edu.

Sensing the Voices of Others

May 24 2018 to May 28 2018 | Prague

Deadline: October 13 2017

http://www.icahdq.org/page/cfp2018

Updated: October 16 2017

Interrogating the digital in human/non-human intimacies

A couple of doctoral students and I are hoping to put together a roundtable for the International Communication Association annual meeting, which will be in Prague in late May (http://www.icahdq.org/page/cfp2018). We're planning to propose to the Philosophy, Theory, and Critique section (http://www.icahdq.org/mpage/PTC2018). The very short description right now is: Sensing the Voices of Others: Interrogating the digital in human/non-human intimacies

This roundtable addresses how social and natural worlds manifest as sense-able and communicable. It interrogates what it means to communicate across constructed boundaries of difference, particularly the human and non-human. In particular, it explores how digital media are implicated in the interplay of intimacy, engagement, and detachment by human and non-human entities. ("Voices" is the theme of the conference, and we're open to a broad interpretation of this stuff, anything to do with sensing/communicating, nonhuman entities, and natureculture.) What we'd need would be an affirmation of interest, a title, and a 150-word abstract. We'd then put that together with other abstracts and submit the whole thing as a proposal. We'll expand and tailor the above description to include the other submissions. Inquiries and submissions should go to me at dunbarhe@usc.edu by October 13.

CALL FOR PAPERS 2018 American Association of Geographers

April 10 2018 to April 14 2018 | New Orleans, LA

Deadline: October 20 2017

Updated: October 16 2017

Digital Natures: Critical Practices of Environmental Modeling in the Age of Big Data
Session Organizers: Eric Nost (University of Wisconsin) & Lily House-Peters (California State University, Long Beach) Session Sponsorship: Digital Geography Specialty Group (DGSG), Cultural and Political Ecology (CAPE) Specialty Group Aiming to confront coastal wetlands loss, Louisiana’s 2017 Coastal Master Plan presents an explicitly data-driven and model-based framework to guide future environmental decision-making, taking advantage of big environmental data sets and tools powerful enough to mine and process them. Louisiana’s Master Plan is hardly unique in this regard; in fact, it is emblematic of a growing trend.

The proliferation of big environmental data and powerful modeling tools is rapidly rescripting how we understand and govern environments, and may be casting environmental data itself as a (new) resource. In this session, we explore what such “data-driven” governance and environmental data as resource mean for environments and their inhabitants around the world. We are especially interested in understanding the practices by which actors make data available to “drive” governance. Associated with the rise of big data is the birth new discourses: “data as the new oil”, data as a hoard, data as a resource to be “mined” (e.g. Toonders 2014). Increasingly, data managers believe there is value in data just waiting to be realized, like oil waiting in the ground, ready to be extracted, refined, transported, and consumed to realize its value. But as (resource) geographers and political ecologists have long shown, resources become useful only in relation to what they are asked to do and the practices that make them legible within particular governance regimes. This implies actors must work with the data, and this is no more evident than in environmental modeling.

On the one hand, big data discourse disavows modeling when it emphasizes automaticity, unsupervised algorithms and machine learning, and the “end of theory.” On the other hand, modeling - practiced with people - is fundamental to producing and making sense of data in the first place. The work of having to sort through big data and determine appropriate models can just as easily inspire dread for analysts as it can inspire hopeful visions of data-driven decision-making. In this way, modeling represents an important moment where both fractures and opportunities in the project of data-driven governance may become legible - through modelers’ practice or the technology itself. For instance, resource geographers have shown how resources themselves can be resistant to extraction and other aims of their users (Bakker and Bridge 2006; also, Kinsley 2014).

And while digital technologies are often promoted as “disruptive,” scholars emphasize the conservative dimensions of modeling, including “algorithmic injustices” that reinforce racism, sexism, and other kinds of discrimination (Crawford 2016). At the same time, certain kinds of modeling, like simulations, can generate abundant representations of possible, even radical, futures. In this session, we aim to interrogate and draw attention to the roles of big data and modeling in the production of certain natures, human and more-than-human resistances to these processes and practices, and the conditions through which modeling transforms data into a resource. Seeking to bridge political ecology and digital geography, we welcome theoretical and empirical contributions that bring diverse perspectives and approaches to examine a series of critical questions: Who models? · Given the neoliberalization of science (Lave et al. 2010), what are the political economic arrangements by which modeling is organized? · In what ways can political ecologists employ modeling? · How do modelers navigate working under increasingly constrained budgets that limit data collection and tool development? · What are the affective dimensions of modeling? How do modelers bring not just “values” but emotional investments to bear in making models work? How does big data drive decisions? · How exactly do decision-makers learn with models? In what ways are decisions algorithmic or not? · What roles do (geo)visualization and representation play in translating modeling into policy? · In what ways are models contested? What are the landscape effects? · How do modelers understand the relationships between models and real world systems in a big data era? (Salmond et al. 2017) · How do different ecosystems enable or resist modeling? · In what ways does modeling and and data-driven environmental governance shape landscape outcomes? What natures are produced?

Those who would like to participate in the session should contact us by October 20 with a brief statement of interest and/or a title & abstract (250 words). Session participants will need to submit an abstract and register for the conference by October 25. Contact Info: Eric Nost (nost@wisc.edu) & Lily House-Peters ( lily.housepeters@csulb.edu) References Bakker, K., and G. Bridge. 2006. Material worlds? Resource geographies and the `matter of nature’. Progress in Human Geography 30 (1):5–27. Crawford, K. 2016. Artificial Intelligence’s White Guy Problem. NYT.com. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/26/opinion/sunday /artificial-intelligences-white-guy-problem.html (last accessed 20 September 2017) Kinsley, S. 2014. The matter of “virtual” geographies. Progress in Human Geography 38 (3):364–384. Lave, R., P. Mirowski, and S. Randalls. 2010. Introduction: STS and Neoliberal Science. Social Studies of Science 40 (5):659–675. Salmond, J. A., M. Tadaki, and M. Dickson. 2017. Can big data tame a “naughty” world?: Environmental big data. The Canadian Geographer / Le Géographe canadien 61 (1):52–63. Toonders, J. 2014. Data is the New Oil of the Digital Economy. Wired.com. https://www.wired.com/insights/2014/07/data-new-oil-digital-economy/ (last accessed 20 September 2017).

Technoscience from Below

June 14 2018 to June 15 2018 | University of Padova , Italy

Deadline: November 15 2017

http://www.stsitalia.org

Updated: October 16 2017

The conference will be an opportunity to present empirical and theoretical work from a variety of disciplines and fields : sociology, anthropology , design , economics, history , law , philosophy , psychology and semiotics . This work will focus on diverse aspects of the social study of science , technology , and innovation . The focal theme of the 7 th STS Italia Conference will be Technoscience from Below . The conference will be organized around multiple thematic tracks , which will be selected by the scientific committee based on the outcome of this call for track s , expiring November 1 5 , 2017.

By focusing on Technoscience from Below , the 7 th STS Italia Conference will offer the opportunity to explore alternative co - producti ve path s of science , technology , and innovation. Contemporary research on alternative paths to innovation show that the production of science and technology is blooming in a variety of alternative domains . These cover previously unexpected geographical contexts and organizational settings , involving a wide array of unconventional actors . Some examples of emerging processes of co - production coming from unpredicted places and actors are DIY practices in biomedicine , technoscientific research from the periphery, marginalised contexts of a globalised world, scattered groups of hackers , and l ively local communities active in environmental sensing through crowd data generation . These processes are carried out by a combination of public authorities and grassroots participation of citizens and other non - institutional actors ( i . e . , environmental citizen groups , hackerspaces , and independent groups of patients ) , as well as with other economic and social actors . Moreover , these collective and distributed processes , in which humans and non - humans interact , also question the political role of technoscience and innovation institutions . T hey place themselves as alternative or even antagonistic points of view around issues of access to innovation , particularly its transparency and democratization .

Technoscience from B elow cannot be explained as the result of independent choices by isolated groups , whether designers , producers , or users ; rather , it emerges as the collective performance of new ways of engagement in research and innovation governance . For these reasons , the exploration of alternative patterns of technoscientific innovation represents an increasingly important task for the STS community and other related fields . Based on this broad reflection , the 7 th Edition of the STS Italia conference sets out with a call for tracks intended to select topics of focus for the conference ’s sessions , which will then form the basis of the call for abstracts . Each track must be presented and managed by one or more convenors . Convenors will be responsible for formulating the call for abstracts , selecting abstracts , and organizing the track . 2 Track proposals should be submitted via e - mail to the organizing committee ( 7thstsitaliaconf@gmail.com ) by November 15 , 2017. Proposals may cover all topics related to the social study of innovation processes , technology , and science . Proposals on the following topics are especially welcome : • Processes and practices of technological innovation • Forms of participation and engagement with technoscience • Design practices inside and outside official research institutions • Postcolonial technoscience: science and technology in non - Western countries • The use and deployment of technology , technical devices , and artefacts • The relationship among innovation , ethics , and responsibility • Regulation and governance of innovation • Communication , media , and digital technologies • Alternative medical practices and healthcare environments • The public shaping of medical research • Hackerspaces , makerspaces , and DIY centres • The relationship among innovation , market , and macro - economic in subaltern contexts • Grassroots innovations for sustainable development • Methodologies for studying technoscientific processes from below • Alternative strategies for communicating science and technology • Research policies and knowledge production in non - institutional loci • Groups , organizations , and places of innovation • The relationship between knowledge and techniques in material and digital products • The body , gender , and technoscientific performance • Critical reflection on the gender - technology relationship • Expectations and promises related to innovation processes • Critical debate on mainstream accounts of the West ’ s technoscientific practices Submissions for thematic tracks should be written in English and Italian and include a short description of the proposed theme and area of interest ( max. 400 words ), as well as some information about the convenors ( max . 50 words each , including email address es ). Convenors will be notified of track acceptance by November 30 , 2017. Convenors will independently set session topics and organize each track according to numerical constraints specified by the scientific board . Convenors who consider an abstract interesting but not suited to their thematic track will be free to re direct the abstract to the scientific board for submission to another track . If a track draws less than three abstracts , the scientific board will decide whether to run the track or merge it with another track .

IMPORTANT DATES • November 15, 2017: Deadline of the call for tracks • November 30 , 2017: Notification of track acceptance • December 1 5 , 2017: Conference announced with call for abstracts • February 15, 2018: Deadline for abstract submission • March 15, 2018: Authors notified of abstract acceptance or rejection • March 30, 2018: Early registration deadline • April 30, 2018: Closing date for registration • May 15, 2018: Publication of final conference program • June 14 - 16 , 2018 : Conference CONTACTS : 7 thStsItaliaConf@gmail . com FURTHER INFO: www . stsitalia . org

Questioning Science in Uncertain Times: A Workshop

February 15 2018 to February 16 2018 | The Ohio State University

Deadline: November 01 2017

https://u.osu.edu/questioningscience/2017/09/08/workshop-themes/

Updated: October 16 2017

Critical reflection on scientific authority has been central to science and technology studies (STS) for some time. Interrogating science’s claim to universality, apoliticism and autonomy, scholars have highlighted the suffusion of values, interests and power inherent in the production, use and consumption of scientific knowledge. Yet, recent political developments have raised questions about the value and ultimate purpose of such critique, leading to concerns about living in a “post-truth” era of “alternative facts.” For example, in massive demonstrations such as the March for Science, protesters oppose what they perceive as a radically altered relationship between science and power.

Echoing the science wars of another era, current conversations question the value and legitimacy of STS scholarship, given its thoroughgoing skepticism of scientific authority, and generate concerns about ceding the public sphere to entrenched private interests and traditional prejudice. As such, this workshop will consider the prospects for sustained investigation and questioning of science and its social standing. What is the role of STS scholars in these times of uncertainty? Does an embattled scientific community require social constructivists to modify, soften or abandon critique? Or is critique necessary now more than ever, given science’s role in sustaining various social injustices?

Our keynote speakers are:

Shobita Parthasarathy, University of Michigan

Rayvon Fouché, Purdue University

Our workshop will feature contributed papers that address the theme of the workshop: how should scholars working in STS and allied fields approach science and technology in these “uncertain” times? We encourage both submissions that interrogate the role of STS, but also submissions that consider questions of science and democratization (e.g. social movements, citizen science, populism, the politics of knowledge and ignorance, etc.), how values are formed in science, the role of art and design in scientific critique, and structural inequalities and the politics of science and technology. (See here additional details.)
To submit a paper for consideration, please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words, including references. Each speaker will have 30 minutes to present their paper during the workshop. The closing date for abstracts is November 1, 2017.

To submit an abstract, please email it as a PDF attachment to chrispincock@gmail.com. If you have any questions about this call, feel free to email either Chris Pincock (chrispincock@gmail.com) or Monamie Bhadra (monamie.bhadra@gmail.com).

A limited amount of funds will be made available for presenters to cover some of the costs of attending the workshop. We plan to finalize the workshop schedule by the end of November.

Fifth Annual Conference on the History of Recent Social Science

June 08 2018 to June 09 2018 | University of Zurich, Switzerland

Deadline: February 04 2018

www.hisress.org.

Updated: October 16 2017

This two-day conference of the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS) will bring together researchers working on the history of post-World War II social science. It will provide a forum for the latest research on the cross-disciplinary history of the post-war social sciences, including but not limited to anthropology, economics, psychology, political science, and sociology as well as related fields like area studies, communication studies, history, international relations, law and linguistics. We are especially eager to receive submissions that treat themes, topics, and events that span the history of individual disciplines.

The conference aims to build upon the recent emergence of work and conversation on cross-disciplinary themes in the postwar history of the social sciences. While large parts of history of social science scholarship still focus on the 19th and early 20th centuries and are attuned to the histories of individual disciplines, there is also a larger interest now in the developments spanning the social sciences in the early, late, and post-Cold War periods. Though each of the major social science fields has a community of disciplinary historians, research explicitly concerned with cross-disciplinary topics remains comparatively rare. The purpose of the conference is to further encourage fruitful cross-disciplinary conversations of recent years.

Submissions are welcome in areas such as: * The uptake of social science concepts and figures in wider intellectual and popular discourses * Comparative institutional histories of departments and programs * Border disputes and boundary work between disciplines as well as academic cultures * Themes and concepts developed in the history and sociology of natural and physical science, reconceptualized for the social science context * Professional and applied training programs and schools, and the quasi-disciplinary fields (like business administration) that typically housed them * The role of social science in post-colonial state-building governance * Social science adaptations to the changing media landscape * The role and prominence of disciplinary memory in a comparative context

The two-day conference will be organized as a series of one-hour, single-paper sessions attended by all participants. Ample time will be set aside for intellectual exchange between presenters and attendees, as all participants are expected to read pre-circulated papers in advance.

Proposals should contain no more than 1000 words, indicating the originality of the paper. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is February 4, 2018. Final notification will be given in early March 2018 after proposals have been reviewed.Completed papers will be expected by May 13, 2018.

The organizing committee consists of Jamie Cohen-Cole (George Washington University), Philippe Fontaine (École normale supérieure de Cachan), Catherine Herfeld (University of Zurich), and Jeff Pooley (Muhlenberg College).

All proposals and requests for information should be sent to: [hisress2018@gmail.com]. For more information on the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS).

Technologies of Frankenstein

March 07 2018 to March 09 2018 | Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, USA

Deadline: October 15 2017

http://frankenstein2018.org/

Updated: October 16 2017

Summary:

The 200th anniversary year of the first edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: Or, The Modern Prometheus has drawn worldwide interest in revisiting the novel’s themes. What were those themes and what is their value to us in the early twenty-first century?

Mary Shelley was rather vague as to how Victor, a young medical student, managed to reanimate a person cobbled together from parts of corpses. Partly as a result of this technical gap, and partly as a result of many other features of the novel, Frankenstein continues to inspire discourse in scholarly, popular, and creative culture about the

Grappling with the Futures

April 29 2018 to April 30 2018 | Boston, MA

Deadline: November 03 2017

http://www.grapplingwiththefutures.com

Updated: October 16 2017

Futures studies, which emerged as a new field after WWII, offer a variety of methods for predicting, forecasting, anticipating, controlling, imagining, and shaping multiple futures. Those methods include trend extrapolation, predictive modeling, scenario-planning, Delphi, and Wild Cards, to name a few. The goal of this symposium is to bring together philosophers, historians, and science, technology and society (STS) scholars who are deeply engaged with the exploration of the futures. We will begin an interdisciplinary dialogue that interrogates the goals, concepts, and methods of futures studies and probes informal futures-oriented thinking that is ubiquitous in social thought and practice.

New edited volume by Parks and Kaplan, Life in the Age of Drone Warfare (Duke U Press, 2017)

https://www.dukeupress.edu/life-in-the-age-of-drone-warfare

Updated: October 16 2017

Duke University Press is pleased to announce the publication of Life in the Age of Drone Warfare, edited by Lisa Parks and Caren Kaplan.

This interdisciplinary volume explores the historical, juridical, geopolitical, and cultural dimensions of drone technology and warfare, showing how drones generate ways of understanding the world, shape the ways lives are lived and ended on the ground, and operate within numerous mechanisms of militarized state power.

Tenure track Assistant Professor in Art/Science Nexus, Arizona State University

Deadline: November 27 2017

Updated: October 13 2017

Job #12165

Arizona State University’s School for the Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS) in partnership with the ASU Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts (HIDA) seek an assistant professor (tenure track) scholar/practitioner who works at the art/science nexus.

We seek someone who thinks about futures, possible worlds, and the governance of innovation by combining artistic and technoscientific methods, transforming disciplinary practice and considering real-world impacts. We especially seek candidates with professional experience who accomplish these outcomes by inventing new technologies, genres of dialogue, narrative, performance and/or events – imagining futures and creating fresh techniques for imagining futures. Ideally, candidates will also be comfortable with some techniques of scientific or engineering research and be able to reflect critically, socio-culturally or artistically on those techniques. The successful candidate will be expected to develop an independently funded and collaborative research program; teach and mentor students; participate in professional and university service; and engage stakeholders.

As part of his or her activities, the successful candidate – along with colleagues from SFIS, HIDA, and elsewhere – will be responsible for shaping and collaboratively mounting an annual, trans-genre event at ASU called “Emerge” (see: http://emerge.asu.edu). The relevant unit within HIDA will most likely be the School of Arts, Media and Engineering (AME), but candidates with backgrounds across the arts should feel free to apply.

Required: PhD or appropriate terminal degree (e.g. MFA) in an area of research-creation-curation. Experience in producing experimental performance, transmedia story-telling, experiential futures, design fiction or other relevant techniques, media arts, performances or events. Commitment to transforming artistic practice, scientific methods, innovation governance and/or futures thinking transdisciplinary collaborations. Evidence of ability to inspire and instruct students from diverse backgrounds. Ability to communicate in and across multiple disciplinary cultures.

Desired: Experience collaborating with colleagues from different disciplines to grow dynamic academic programs.

As the newest element of ASU’s approach to building a “New American University” (http://newamericanuniversity.asu.edu/), SFIS (http://sfis.asu.edu) provides robust opportunities for intellectual fusion, use-inspired research, and global engagement via ongoing projects and centers. SFIS hosts a variety of graduate degrees including a Ph.D. in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology and a Master of Science degree in Global Technology and Development, as well as an undergraduate major, minor and certificate in Innovation in Society.

The Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts (http://herbergerinstitute.asu.edu/) is the largest comprehensive design and arts school in the nation, located within a dynamic 21st-century research university. Our college is built on a combination of disciplines unlike any other program in the nation, comprising schools of art; arts, media + engineering; design; film, dance and theatre; and music; as well as the ASU Art Museum.

To apply, please submit: 1) a detailed cover letter that includes a description of the applicant's research and teaching interests and experience (limited to 4 pages); 2) a current Curriculum Vitae; and 3) the names, email addresses and telephone numbers of three references. All materials should be submitted as a single PDF document to sfis@asu.edu. Review of applications will begin November 27, 2017 if not filled, a review will occur every Friday thereafter until the search is closed. A background check is required for employment.

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer committed to excellence through diversity (see ASU’s Prohibition Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation policy at http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html). All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law (see ASU’s Title IX policy at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/). Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Assistant Professor in Interdisciplinary Social Science/Science, Technology and Society, ASU

Deadline: November 27 2017

https://cisa.asu.edu/jobs

Updated: October 12 2017

The Social Science faculty in the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts (CISA) on the Polytechnic Campus at Arizona State University invites applications for an Assistant Professor position in Interdisciplinary Social Science/Science, Technology and Society. Expectations for this position include: teach undergraduate and graduate courses, engage in research applicable to your field, provide innovative teaching techniques, advise students, and provide service to the unit, college, and university. Teaching load is typically two (2) courses per semester. Course load and composition is determined by the faculty head. This is an academic-year appointment with an expected start date of August 2018. The Assistant Professor position is a benefits-eligible appointment with tenure implications. Salary is competitive to commensurate with experience.

Required Qualifications:
- Terminal degree at the time of appointment in any social science discipline, interdisciplinary social science or related field with a strong background in science, technology and society, broadly defined
- Excellent written and spoken communication skills
- Clear potential to secure external research funding
- Evidence of excellent teaching effectiveness
- Strong record (or evidence of the promise) of scholarly research and publications

Desired Qualifications:
- Demonstrated success meeting the needs of diverse student populations and/or reaching out to diverse communities
- A record of publishing in peer-reviewed journals
- Two (2) or more years of teaching experience at the undergraduate and/or graduate levels
- Evidence of teaching large on-line classes as well as face-to-face classes
- Experience working in a collaborative environment and across disciplines
- Record of ability to secure external research funding
- Experience using course management systems such as Blackboard
- Evidence of ability to establish internship relations with industry partners

Application Procedure:
To apply, visit https://cisa.asu.edu/jobs and upload your application as one combined .pdf document under job number 12160. Only
electronic submissions will be reviewed. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Applications must contain:

1. A letter of interest outlining candidate’s research agenda, qualifications and experience as they relate to the position (limited to 4 pages). Also, candidates should familiarize themselves with the educational and research initiatives and programs at CISA Social Science and describe how their educational preparation, scholarly activities and teaching experience will contribute to their advancement.
2. Curriculum vitae
3. Statement of teaching philosophy
4. Evidence of teaching effectiveness
5. Information for three professional references (their position, title, e-mail, phone number)

The application deadline is 11/27/2017 at 5pm; and if not filled, then every Friday thereafter until the search is closed. Official Transcripts required prior to first day of employment. A background check is required prior to employment. For technical assistance with your application contact cisajobs@asu.edu, for position-related questions contact, Search Committee Chair, Dr. Patience Akpan-Obong, patience.akpan@asu.edu

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants
will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis
protected by law. (See ASU's complete non-discrimination statement at https://asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html; see ASU’s Title
IX policy at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/)

Linda Hall Library Seeks Fellows Among Science, Technology Historians

Deadline: January 19 2018

http://www.lindahall.org/fellowships

Updated: October 12 2017

The Linda Hall Library is pleased to announce its fellowship program for the academic year 2018/19. Fellowships, lasting anywhere from one week to a full academic year, are awarded to outstanding projects in the history of science, environmental history, and related science and technology studies fields that make use of the Library’s collections. Graduate students are also encouraged to apply for the 80/20 fellowship, which allows them to collaborate with staff on a public history project based on their research.

The Linda Hall Library, located next to the University of Missouri-Kansas City in Kansas City, Mo., is among the world’s leading independent research libraries, boasting extensive primary and secondary sources related to engineering, physics, chemistry, earth science, astronomy, environmental science, meteorology, and the life sciences. The Library’s collections include more than 10,000 rare books dating from the 15th century to the present, as well as 500,000 monograph volumes and more than 48,000 journal titles from around the world, with especially strong holdings in Soviet and East Asian science. Its collections also contain conference proceedings, government publications, technical reports, and over 200,000 industrial standards. Fellows at the Linda Hall Library participate in a vibrant intellectual community alongside in-house scholars and colleagues from nearby research institutions.

For more information and to apply online by January 19, 2018, visit: http://www.lindahall.org/fellowships.

Clinical Assistant/Associate Professor, College of Integrative Science and Arts, Arizona State

Deadline: November 27 2017

https://cisa.asu.edu/jobs

Updated: October 12 2017

The Social Science faculty in the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts (CISA) on the Polytechnic Campus at Arizona State University invites applications for a Clinical Assistant/Associate Professor position for the 2018-2019 academic year. This is primarily an instructional position. However, the successful candidate will also serve as the Instruction Leader in our Death and Dying course (ASB 353) sections as well as teach and advise students. ASB 353 typically records a high number of students, thus requiring an Instructional Leader to coordinate and assign different sections to other teaching faculty. We are an interdisciplinary faculty seeking a candidate who can teach across disciplines. Course assignments are at the graduate/undergraduate levels, and may occur in a variety of modalities (online, on-ground, hybrid). Course load is four (4) courses per semester, and the successful candidate will also be expected to participate in service to the institution and profession as appropriate. This is a full-time, benefits-eligible, non-tenure eligible position renewable on an academic year basis contingent upon satisfactory performance, availability of resources, and the needs of the university. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience. The successful candidate must reside in Arizona, or be willing to relocate. For more information please visit https://cisa.asu.edu/.

Required Qualifications:
- Terminal degree in the health sciences or related field with a clinical background
- Evidence of at least two years of teaching excellence at the post-secondary level
- Experience in designing curriculum and creating instructional, assessment materials for courses in the teaching field
- Ability to teach on online learning platforms such as Blackboard
- Ability to teach upper-division courses in program area
- Excellent written and verbal communication skills

Desired Qualifications:
- At least four years of post-secondary teaching experience
- Demonstrated success meeting the needs of diverse student populations and/or reaching out to diverse communities
- Demonstrated success in teaching large online classes
- Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively in a team environment
- Evidence of service and contributions to the profession
- Experience establishing and maintaining community and industry partnerships

Application Procedure:

To apply, visit https://cisa.asu.edu/jobs and upload your application as one combined .pdf document under job number 12161. Only electronic submissions will be reviewed. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Applications must contain:

1. A letter of interest as it relates to the position and will include a description of the applicant's scholarly, educational, and clinical experience. Also, applicants should familiarize themselves with the programs at CISA Social Science and describe how their educational preparation and teaching experience will contribute to their advancement.
2. Curriculum vitae
3. Teaching statement including philosophy
4. Evidence of teaching effectiveness
5. Information for three professional references (their position, title, e-mail, phone number)

The application deadline is 11/27/2017 at 5pm; and if not filled, then every Friday thereafter until the search is closed. Official
Transcripts required prior to first day of employment. A background check is required prior to employment. For technical assistance
with your application contact cisahr@asu.edu, for position-related questions contact Dr. Patience Akpan-Obong, patience.akpan@asu.edu.

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants
will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis
protected by law. (See ASU's complete non-discrimination statement at https://asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html; see ASU’s Title
IX policy at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/)

IPRH–Andrew W. Mellon Pre-Doctoral Fellowships in Environmental Humanities, 2018–19

Deadline: January 12 2018

http://www.iprh.illinois.edu/fellowships/mellon/preDoc.html

Updated: October 12 2017

The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities, supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, seeks to select two Pre-Doctoral Fellows in Environmental Humanities for the 2018–19 academic year.

Environmental Humanities pulls the energy of several discipline-centric humanistic and related movements—environmental philosophy, environmental history, ecocriticism, cultural geography, anthropology, and others—into one common conversation about the relationship between humans and non-human nature, past and present. Intensely interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, practitioners of the environmental humanities are united by their desire to understand the human place in nature, as well as to examine critically the way people make meaning of it.

The IPRH-Mellon Pre-Doctoral Fellows will participate in all activities of the Environmental Humanities Research Group, as led by the IPRH-Mellon Faculty Fellow in Environmental Humanities, Professor Robert Morrissey. In addition to pursuing environmental humanities-related research projects of their own, the IPRH-Mellon Pre-Doctoral Fellows will participate in a seminar aimed at developing methodologies for environmental humanities research and pedagogy.

Advanced PhD students from all humanities disciplines, including the humanities-inflected social sciences, whose research and teaching interests lie in the area of environmental humanities, are encouraged to apply. Special consideration will be given to applicants whose scholarship explores themes of climate or climate change, indigenous studies, place and space, resilience, or technology.

New Book by Edward Jones-Imhotep: The Unreliable Nation (MIT Press, 2017)

https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/unreliable-nation

Updated: October 12 2017

Edward Jones-Imhotep, The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold War (MIT Press, 2017) ISBN: 9780262036511.

Synopsis: Throughout the modern period, nations defined themselves through the relationship between nature and machines. Many cast themselves as a triumph of technology over the forces of climate, geography, and environment. Some, however, crafted a powerful alternative identity: they defined themselves not through the triumph of machines over nature, but through technological failures and the distinctive natural orders that caused them. In The Unreliable Nation, Edward Jones-Imhotep examines one instance in this larger history: the Cold War–era project to extend reliable radio communications to the remote and strategically sensitive Canadian North. He argues that, particularly at moments when countries viewed themselves as marginal or threatened, the identity of the modern nation emerged as a scientifically articulated relationship between distinctive natural phenomena and the problematic behaviors of complex groups of machines.

Drawing on previously unpublished archival documents and recently declassified materials, Jones-Imhotep shows how Canadian defense scientists elaborated a distinctive “Northern” natural order of violent ionospheric storms and auroral displays, and linked it to a “machinic order” of severe and widespread radio disruptions throughout the country. Tracking their efforts through scientific images, experimental satellites, clandestine maps, and machine architectures, he argues that these scientists naturalized Canada’s technological vulnerabilities as part of a program to reimagine the postwar nation. The real and potential failures of machines came to define Canada, its hostile Northern nature, its cultural anxieties, and its geo-political vulnerabilities during the early Cold War. Jones-Imhotep’s study illustrates the surprising role of technological failures in shaping contemporary understandings of both nature and nation.

About the Author: Edward Jones-Imhotep is Associate Professor of History at York University, in Toronto.

Tenure/Tenure Track Faculty in Information Science, Cornell University (Cornell Tech, NYC)

Deadline: December 01 2017

https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/9897

Updated: October 12 2017

Faculty positions in Information Science are available at the Cornell Tech campus in New York City. Applications are welcome at all levels, including tenured and tenure-track; applications in the areas of cyber-physical systems (especially in urban environments) and health tech are particularly encouraged. This search includes Cornell faculty positions that are part of the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute at Cornell Tech. Note that faculty positions at the Ithaca campus require a separate application.

Faculty hired in these positions at Cornell Tech will be within the Department of Information Science, which spans the Ithaca and New York City campuses, but their teaching and research will be based in New York City. The Department of Information Science brings together faculty, students and researchers who share an interest in advancing our understanding of how people and society interact with computing and information. Current research trajectories include: data science and its implications; ubiquitous computing and interactive systems; information visualization; information policy; computational social science; social computing; network science; human-robot interaction; digital humanities; the history and anthropology of computing and data; the interface of economics and information; critical and interpretive analysis of information systems; the sociology of organizations and innovation; human-computer interaction and design; computer-supported cooperative work and computer-mediated communication; policy and design for social impact; technology and equity.

Candidates must hold or receive a Ph.D. or equivalent degree by August 2018, have demonstrated an ability to conduct outstanding research at the level of tenure-track or tenured faculty in the Department of Information Science, and also have a strong commitment to engagement outside of academia in ways that foster significant commercial or societal impact, as aligned with the mission of the Cornell Tech campus. Successful candidates are expected to pursue an active research program, to teach Master’s and Ph.D.-level graduate courses, and to supervise graduate students.

To ensure full consideration, applications should be received by December 1, 2017, but will be accepted until all positions are filled. Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae, brief statements of research and teaching interests, and arrange to have at least three reference letters submitted. In the cover letter, CV, or research statement, applicants should identify a small set of their most significant pieces of work. A distinguishing characteristic of research at Cornell Tech, in addition to world-class academic work, is that it engages deeply with external communities, organizations, K-12 education, and industry to address real-world problems and contexts that amplify the direct commercial and societal impact of our research. Accordingly, within a clearly identified subsection of the Research Statement, the candidate should address prior accomplishments and future plans related to this kind of direct commercial and/or societal impact of their research. The above application information should be submitted online
at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/9897.

Diversity and inclusion are a part of Cornell University’s heritage. We are a recognized employer and educator valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities.

Information about the Information Science Department and Cornell Tech appears at http://www.infosci.cornell.edu and http://www.tech.cornell.edu

Inquiries about your application may be directed to fac_recruit@infosci.cornell.edu.

Tenure/Tenure Track Faculty, Department of Information Science, Cornell University (Ithaca, NY)

Deadline: December 01 2017

https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/9895

Updated: October 12 2017

Faculty positions in Information Science are available at the Cornell University campus in Ithaca, NY. Applications are welcome at all levels, including tenured, tenure-track, and lecturer. Note that faculty positions at the Cornell Tech campus in New York City require a separate application.

The Department of Information Science at Cornell University brings together faculty, students and researchers who share an interest in advancing our understanding of how people and society interact with computing and information. Exceptional candidates in all areas related to the department's current research trajectories and priorities will be given serious consideration; these include human-computer interaction (HCI) and design; data science and its implications; computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) and computer-mediated communication (CMC); social computing; information policy; network science; computational social science; digital humanities; the history and anthropology of computing and data; the interface of economics and information; critical and interpretive analysis of information systems; human-robot interaction (HRI); ubiquitous computing and interactive systems; information visualization; the sociology of organizations and innovation; policy and design for social impact; technology and equity.

Candidates must hold or receive a Ph.D. or equivalent degree by August 2018. Assistant Professor candidates must demonstrate the potential to achieve excellence in research and teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. More senior candidates must have an established record of outstanding research and excellent teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate levels; salary and rank will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. Experienced applicants may merit a tenured Associate Professor or Professor position, depending on their qualifications. Lecturer candidates must demonstrate the potential to achieve excellence in teaching at the undergraduate and master level.

To ensure full consideration, applications should be received by December 1, 2017, but will be accepted until all positions are filled.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vita (CV), brief statements of research and teaching interests, and arrange to have at least three reference letters submitted. In the cover letter, CV, or research statement, applicants should identify a small set of their most significant pieces of work. The above application information should be submitted online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/9895.

The Information Science Department is housed in the Faculty of Computing and Information Science. In Ithaca, it is located in Cornell's Gates Hall. It has strong connections with several other units on campus, including: Computer Science (with which it shares Gates Hall), Communication, Economics, Sociology, Science and Technology Studies, Operations Research and Information Engineering, and Cognitive Science.

Diversity and inclusion are a part of Cornell University’s heritage. We are a recognized employer and educator valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities.

Cornell University seeks to meet the needs of dual career couples, has a Dual Career program, and is a member of the Upstate New York Higher Education Recruitment Consortium to assist with dual career searches.

Information about the Information Science Department appears at http://www.infosci.cornell.edu. Inquiries about your application may be directed to fac_recruit@infosci.cornell.edu


AAAS Spanish Language Mass Media Fellows Program

Deadline: January 15 2018

https://www.aaas.org/massmedia/spanish

Updated: October 12 2017

AAAS serves the growing Latino populations of the US by supporting science communication and education in the language of their communities. The recruitment of Spanish Language Mass Media Fellows helps bring science news to the mainstream Spanish news outlets to share with Spanish speaking communities. AAAS is excited to be continuing the program for the 2018 Fellowship year.

Increasing public understanding of science and technology is a principal goal of AAAS. For some 40 years the Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellows Program has helped develop scientists, engineers, and mathematicians who are well-versed in communicating complex ideas to a general audience via placement in media sites across the United States. The importance of increasing public understanding of scientific issues, like the environment and health, is increasing. Reaching out to specific communities, especially those not well served by mainstream science media, is required to make sure science communication and education is available to everyone. We wish to focus on serving the growing Latino populations of the US by supporting science communication and education in the language of those communities and by addressing issues of importance to the communities.

For the first time in 2014, AAAS recruited two Spanish Language Fellows to expand the work with mainstream Spanish news outlets to bring science news to Spanish speaking communities. AAAS plans to continue the program and recruit Spanish Language Fellows indefinitely.

Application Procedures

The Spanish Language Mass Media Fellows application is identical to the regular Mass Media Fellows Application (including criteria). Details can be found within the APPLY tab: http://www.aaas.org/page/apply

All application materials must be submitted online by 11:59pm EST, 15 January 2017.

In terms of the application packet, some of the pieces should be submitted in English and some in Spanish. Please see below for the requirements.

- Applicant information (contact information, academic history etc.) (English)
- Your CV (please include any honors, awards, and relevant activities) (English)
- General Writing Sample: ONE 2-3 page brief sample of your writing that is on any subject (science or non-science topic) and directed toward a non-scientific audience (using appropriate language for the general public). Please do not include technical or journal articles. (Spanish)
- Sample News Story: A 750-word 'news' story for the general public summarizing a science, mathematics or engineering journal article from the past 6 months (published after July 1, 2015) and describing what the study's findings are, why the study's findings are important and what impact it will have on the public. (Spanish)
- Source Article: The source journal article used to write your Sample News Story. (the news article itself may be in English or Spanish)
- Candidate Questions: Responses to each of the 7 reflective questions found within the application. (English)
- Two "Recommendation Questionnaires" completed online by recommenders you identify. At one two of these recommenders should be from a faculty member who can comment on your academic work. A third is optional but encouraged. Recommendations from those that can comment on your science communication or writing is highly encouraged as well. (English)
- Unofficial transcripts of your undergraduate and graduate work (to be uploaded online or mailed directly to the program, but not both).

Applicants are required to be fluent in speaking and writing in Spanish. Interested applicants are encouraged to apply for both the traditional Mass Media Fellowship (in English) and the Spanish Language Fellowship. If you choose to apply for both, applicants will need to fill out two separate applications, and therefore will need to create two separate logins using two different email addresses. Please email mmfellowship@aaas.org if you plan on applying to both fellowships.

AAAS Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellowship

Deadline: January 15 2018

http://aaas.org/mmfellowship

Updated: October 12 2017

The AAAS Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellowship places science, engineering, and mathematics students and postdocs at media organizations nationwide. They have worked as reporters, editors, researchers, and production assistants at media outlets that include the Los Angeles Times, WIRED, National Public Radio, National Geographic, and Scientific American.

The Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellows use their academic training in the sciences as they research, write and report today’s headlines, while sharpening their abilities to communicate complex scientific issues to the public. The Fellowship experience broadens the participant’s career path while increasing the public’s understanding of science and technology. For additional information about the program visit http://aaas.org/mmfellowship.

2018 application available October 16 – January 15

Non-tenure-stream lecturer in Gender and Science, University of Pittsburgh

Deadline: December 15 2017

https://facultysearch.as.pitt.edu/apply/index/MjAy

Updated: October 12 2017

The Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies (GSWS) Program at the University of Pittsburgh invites applications for a non-tenure-steam lecturer position in the area of gender and science.

Pending budgetary approval, the position will begin in fall 2018 with an initial three-year contract, with the possibility of obtaining renewable three-year contracts after satisfactory performance reviews.

Applicants must demonstrate interest and proficiency in teaching relations between gender and science from an interdisciplinary and intersectional perspective. The successful candidate will be an innovative teacher and will develop a general education course “Gender and Science” while also teaching GSWS courses such as Introduction to GSWS, Introduction to Feminist Theory, and advanced courses based on areas of interest and expertise (e.g., Gender and Disability, Gender and Medicine, Science and Sexuality, Gender and Health, etc.). Candidates must be able to work collaboratively in an interdisciplinary program, direct undergraduate research projects or internships, organize events and student colloquia, and participate in collective governance. A PhD in hand at the time of appointment is required. PhD may be in any discipline, including but not limited to Gender Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Communications, Philosophy, or Science and Technology Studies. The teaching load is three courses per semester.

The GSWS Program at the University of Pittsburgh is a vibrant community of interdisciplinary students and scholars with an undergraduate major and minor, a graduate certificate, and a very active events calendar with visiting scholars, conferences, and other research activities.

Applicants should submit a dossier by December 15, 2017 at the following link https://facultysearch.as.pitt.edu/apply/index/MjAy. Dossier must include: a letter of application containing a description of academic background and teaching philosophy, current curriculum vitae, graduate transcripts, three letters of recommendation, sample syllabi, course materials, student evaluations (2-4 sets), and a list of courses that could be taught at Pittsburgh. A diversity statement is also required (upload as “Brief Personal Statement” in the system). No personal statement is needed. Instead, please upload a statement addressing your contributions to diversity through research, service and/or community engagement. Applicants should share how their past, planned, or potential contributions or experiences relating to diversity, equity, and inclusion will advance the University of Pittsburgh’s commitment to inclusive excellence. An academic writing sample may also be uploaded.

Questions can be directed to the Director of GSWS, Prof. Todd Reeser at reeser@pitt.edu. For more information, see http://gsws.pitt.edu.

The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and values equality of opportunity, human dignity and diversity. EEO/AA/M/F/Vets/Disabled.

New Book by Venla Oikkonen: Population Genetics and Belonging (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)

https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783319628806

Updated: October 12 2017

Population Genetics and Belonging: A Cultural Analysis of Genetic Ancestry, a new book by Venla Oikkonen (Palgrave Macmillan 2017)

Description: This book explores how human population genetics has emerged as a means of imagining and enacting belonging in contemporary society. Venla Oikkonen approaches population genetics as an evolving set of technological, material, narrative and affective practices, arguing that these practices are engaged in multiple forms of belonging that are often mutually contradictory. Considering scientific, popular and fictional texts, with several carefully selected case studies spanning three decades, the author traces shifts in the affective, material and gendered preconditions of population genetic visions of belonging. Topics encompass the debate about Mitochondrial Eve, ancient human DNA, temporality and nostalgia, commercial genetic ancestry tests, and tensions between continental and national genetic inheritance.

Applications now being accepted, PhD/MA Programs in Global Studies, UC Santa Barbara

Deadline: December 15 2017

https://www.graddiv.ucsb.edu/eapp/

Updated: October 02 2017

Global Studies is an emergent field concerned with understanding the historical and contemporary phenomenon of globalization that seeks to promote critical reflection on how the world works as an interlinked, interactive set of processes and relationships. Global Studies is a synthesis of social science and humanities perspectives distinguished by its engagement with transnationalism, problem focus, and exploration of interdisciplinary, multi-disciplinary, and trans-disciplinary modes of inquiry. As a field, Global Studies now encompasses over 300 undergraduate and graduate programs nationwide, as well as over 60 graduate programs worldwide. Our faculty teach and conduct research in the department's three thematic concentrations: (i) global culture, ideology and religion; (ii) global political economy, development and environment, (iii) global governance, civil society and human rights.

The Fall 2018 online application (https://www.graddiv.ucsb.edu/eapp/) is open now. The application deadline is December 15, 2017.

Admission decisions are based upon the overall strength of application materials as a whole, compared to other applicants in that pool, not solely on the basis of one particular aspect. The admissions committee will consider the candidate’s GRE score, transcripts, letters of recommendation, research/writing sample, GPA, and possibly skype/phone interviews, when making decisions about admission. The candidate’s academic orientation and fit with our field and faculty are also important considerations that should be reflected in the statement of purpose. Please be advised that all applicants must have taken and received scores for the GRE (plus the TOEFL or IELTS exam for those for whom English is not a first language). Intensive preparation for the GRE is recommended.

Before applying, applicants should also read and research the published work of our faculty (http://www.global.ucsb.edu/people/academic) in your intended field of research. This may be useful to include in your statement of purpose as well.

Prospective applicants may also wish to explore the research interests of our current graduate students:

Current Grad Students:

http://www.global.ucsb.edu/phd/phd-student-profiles
http://www.global.ucsb.edu/graduate/ma-student-profiles

Please examine closely the posted information about the application process to our graduate programs prior to applying (see links below). Applicants may only apply to one program at UCSB at a time. Please remember that our M.A. and Ph.D. are separate programs, and that admission to the M.A. is not routinely transferrable to the Ph.D.


MA Program

http://www.global.ucsb.edu/graduate
http://www.global.ucsb.edu/graduate/admissions


PhD Program

http://www.global.ucsb.edu/phd
http://www.global.ucsb.edu/phd/admissions

General Admissions Assistance:
https://www.graddiv.ucsb.edu/admissions/how-to-apply

Financial support options are available to MA and PhD students, including Teaching Assistant (TA) and Graduate Student Researcher (GSR) positions, department stipends, in addition to campus and departmental fellowships. The MA program has enjoyed twelve years of success. It takes two years to complete the MA program, which usually includes a research trip or internship abroad. MA students are fully supported for their first year, but are generally required to TA at least two quarters. In their second year, M.A.s are offered tuition remission and additional, partial support for internships and some TAships, but usually need to pursue some additional funding across the university.

The PhD program is relatively new (our first cohort of students are starting their third-year). The program takes approximately 5 years to complete, although there may be ways to speed up your graduation time (i.e. by taking larger course loads in the second year and completing Qualifying Exams in your third year). Since we only admit a small number of PhD applicants, many (but not necessarily all) applicants receive some type of funding. Ph.D. funding is usually based on a combination of outside fellowships, university fellowships, department stipends, and several years of guaranteed TAships. In the third year and beyond, most Ph.D.s will need to apply for outside fellowships and may have opportunities for teaching and research posts.

You will automatically be considered for all applicable support while your application is being evaluated for admission. Additional fellowship details:

https://www.graddiv.ucsb.edu/financial/central-campus-fellowships

For further information about application process, aid, or criteria, please contact the departmental Graduate Advisor, Erika Klukovich, at:

gd-global@global.ucsb.edu

If you have questions about issues of research, curriculum, or advising, please contact the Director of the Graduate Programs, Professor Paul Amar: amar@global.ucsb.edu

Applicants are also invited to reach out with specific questions to any other member of the faculty whose work interests them.

Warm regards and thanks for your interest!

EDGI report released on Environmental Injustice in the age of Trump

http://100days.envirodatagov.org/

Updated: September 27 2017

EDGI is producing a series of reports on the early days of the Trump administration. In these reports, EDGI authors systematically investigate topics including the historical precedents for Trump’s attack on the EPA, consequences for toxics regulation and environmental justice, the influence of the fossil fuel industry on the new administration, changes to the public presentation of climate science, and the new administration’s hostility to scientific research and evidence.

Series editors: Rebecca Lave and Sara Wylie; Series designer: Kyala Shea; Website design and development: Shaquilla Singh

Assistant Professor, Science and Technology Studies, York University

Deadline: December 04 2017

http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/

Updated: September 27 2017

The Department of Science & Technology Studies (STS) at York University invites applications for a tenure-stream appointment in STS at the Assistant Professor level, to commence July 1, 2018.

We are seeking candidates with teaching and research strengths in contemporary issues in STS preferably in one or more of the following topics: big data; environment and climate change; genomics and genomic technologies; science & technology policy and politics; and science & technology in the Global South. The successful candidate will teach undergraduate courses in our STS program, as well as in our Natural Science curriculum (a General Education program for non-Science majors). The candidate must be suitable for prompt appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies to facilitate teaching and supervision in the Graduate Program in STS.

Candidates must have a PhD in STS, or in a related field, and will show excellence or promise of excellence in teaching and in their scholarly research and publications. Pedagogical innovation in high priority areas such as experiential education and technology enhanced learning is an asset. Demonstrated commitment to program development, community engagement, or professional leadership are valued assets.
All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval. York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA Program, which applies to Aboriginal people, visible minorities, people with disabilities, and women, can be found at http://www.yorku.ca/acadjobs or by calling the AA office at 416-736-5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

The deadline for receipt of completed applications is December 4, 2017. Complete applications include a letter of application with an up-to-date curriculum vitae, a statement of research and teaching interests, three current letters of reference (at least one letter should address teaching), and teaching evaluations. Inquiries regarding the position should be addressed to Prof Kenton Kroker at stschair@yorku.ca. Applications are to be sent to STS Search Committee, Department of Science and Technology Studies, 218 Norman Bethune College, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3, Email: stsadmin@yorku.ca. Applicants wishing to self-identify can do so by downloading, completing and submitting the form found at: http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/.

The STS Conference Graz 2018

May 07 2018 to May 08 2018 | HOTEL WEITZER, Graz

Deadline: October 31 2017

http://www.sts-conference-graz.aau.at

Updated: September 17 2017

The STS Conference Graz 2018 is the joint Annual Conference of the Institute of Science, Technology and Society Studies at Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt|Wien|Graz (STS), the Inter-University Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture (IFZ) and the Institute for Advanced Studies on Science, Technology and Society (IAS-STS).

In our Call for Sessions we suggest the following thematic fields (Gender-Technology-Environment, Digitalization of Society, Life Sciences/Biotechnology, Sustainable and Innovative Public Procurement & Ecodesign, Towards Low-Carbon Energy and Mobility Systems, Sustainable Food Systems) and we would like to encourage participants to think outside the box by combining thematic fields and considering intersections: http://www.sts-conference-graz.aau.at.

Sessions do not need to be limited to academic paper presentations. We encourage you to suggest interactive and innovative session formats too, such as discussion groups, slow talks, etc.

Please let us know in case you plan an alternative setting by briefly describing it.



For submitting your session abstract, please use this online form and send an abstract (max. 500 words) no later than October 31, 2017.



2018 ANU conference on Circus and Science

April 03 2018 to April 05 2018 | Humanities Research Centre at the Australian National University i

Deadline: September 15 2017

http://hrc.anu.edu.au/events/imagineers-conference

Updated: September 17 2017

Scientists seek to investigate the ways in which nature works and to ask how humanity can best comprehend different aspects of the universe. By challenging conventional wisdom, scientists can act as rebels against the status quo and common sense. In cultural and fictional contexts, they may appear and behave like artists: creative, skilled craftsmen; ‘imagineers’ and bewildering performers. These fictional scientists do not merely domesticate the unknown and the uncanny, they also invent and stage it.

One of the most productive breeding grounds for the invention, amalgamation, and staging of scientific knowledge and creative imagination has been the circus and related cultural phenomena, such as freakshows, carnivals, and 19th-century ‘scientific’ museums. These sensational, kaleidoscopic institutions present(ed) manifold wondrous exhibits, including automatons, wax figures, and mummies, but they also presented scientific discoveries. Barnum’s American Museum, for example, made hundreds of previously unseen specimens accessible to a broad audience.

Exhibitions and shows of this type united science with mystery, acted as mediators of knowledge, and were often the primary public source of information about the current state of scientific research. They are reminders that science and its pursuits are matters of perspective, and the product and producer of good stories. What do these stories tell us about the “two cultures” of the humanities and science?

Keynote speakers

Professor Rosemarie Garland-Thomson (Emory University) Professor Jane Goodall (University of Western Sydney) Professor Richard Weihe (Accademia Teatro Dimitri/SUPSI Verscio, Switzerland) Professor Peta Tait (La Trobe University)

Focus

We welcome proposals for individual, 20-minute papers addressing any aspect of science and the circus (and related phenomena) including:

Cultural and literary studies Circus studies, Theatre and performance studies Indigenous literatures from around the world and their relation to science and performance Posthumanism Zoopoetics, animal art and critical animal studies Intersections of aesthetic and scientific treatments of cultural issues Imaginaries of technology and performance (e.g. in films) Museology, and applied art and science

While this conference is concerned primarily with culture and literature, we envisage it as a multi-disciplinary event and will welcome proposals from any disciplinary perspective.




To Boldly Preserve: Archiving for the Next Half-Century of Space Flight

March 01 2018 to March 03 2018 | American Institute of Physics in College Park, Maryland

Deadline: October 01 2017

Updated: September 17 2017

We will examine the unprecedented challenges and opportunities preserving the history of space exploration faces in this digital, big data era. New forms of electronic communication and data including oral histories and social media are changing the nature of historical records and increasing their ease of collection. Even as early generations of researchers, engineers, administrators and users retire, the number of countries, organizations, businesses, and other non-government actors involved in space is sharply expanding. Relying on the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for U.S. government records management, while still essential, is increasingly inadequate. Furthermore, most of humanity experiences space exploration either as users (e.g., communications and weather) or as a source of imagination and enthusiasm. How do we document and archive the activities of hundreds of actors in space? How do we archive the experience of users? How do we archive imagination? The internet and widespread use of digital media have spurred tremendous popular interest in do- it-yourself oral history and other emerging methods for archiving among people not classically trained as historians, archivists, or records managers.

Done well, these bottom-up approaches could greatly expand the availability of historical records -- especially by groups, organizations, and individuals not fully captured by government archives. To examine critical issues in creating, collecting, preserving, and accessing space archives worldwide, this conference will bring the historical and archival communities together with space industry, records management, digital humanities, and library media management professionals. The conference will 1) explore data management strategies and toolboxes of exemplary best practices, 2) provide a variety of archival models for oral histories, digital, print, and less conventional collections management (such as software and artifacts), 3) disseminate these strategies and practices to space stakeholders, and 4) encourage underrepresented minorities and communities to create and archive their contributions to space history. To encourage discussion, we will pre-circulate conference papers to registrants and post them to the conference website. An edited volume based on the conference will be published as well as guides of best practices. Possible topics include but are not limited to: - Space archives: The first half-century - Space archives: Contemporary and future issues - Archiving space-based business and operations - Collecting and contextualizing social media, hardware and software - Integrating Do-It- Yourself history with archives - Legal concerns: Intellectual property rights, classification, Nondisclosure Acts, ITAR, records management, archiving by lawyers - Contract history: Templates for a successful project - Getting buy-in from individuals and organizations

- Reaching underrepresented people and areas - Archiving the experience of users - Finding archival partners and solutions - Ensuring access: Data management, ADA - Dissemination and diffusion of best practices While focused on space history, this NSF-funded conference aims to have a much larger impact by providing recommendations on policy and best practices. This conference addresses issues faced by all areas of history and science, technology, and society studies – encouraging high quality “history from below,” using new electronic technologies, preserving a wild range of materials, and educating a new generation of stakeholders. “To Boldly Preserve” will be held March 1-2, 2018 at the Center for the History of Physics at the American Institute of Physics in College Park, Maryland and will be conducted in English. The organizers can assist with travel and accommodation expenses for presenters. Please send a one- page abstract and one-page CV as one PDF file to toboldlypreserve@gmail.com by October 1, 2017. Decisions about acceptance will be made by November 1, 2017. For more information, contact Jonathan Coopersmith (j-coopersmith@tamu.edu), Angelina Callahan (angelina.callahan@nrl.navy.mil), or Greg Good (ggood@aip.org).

Making Science, Technology and Society Together

July 25 2018 to July 28 2018 | Lancaster University, UK

Deadline: November 08 2017

http://easst.net/easst-2018/

Updated: September 17 2017


The word ‘meeting’ contains rich and diverse meanings. In English we find the following: an act or process of joining or coming together of people or things; an intersection or confluence; an encounter; an assembly; a place and time for discussion or decision; a space for dissent, battle, entertainment or contest; and (archaically) a unit of measurement. *Meetings* has critical resonance at this time. Political and social forces – such as Brexit, Trump’s Presidency in the US, the rise in support for PVV in the Netherlands and for Front Nationale in France – seek to undo many relations and connections and to establish new, often exclusionary and destructive, alliances. That is, the politics of *meetings* is not a choice between doing or not doing relations, but rather to think about which actors meet and how, and to curate meetings that make some things present and other things absent. In this context, and in step with many other progressive responses, the EASST 2018 Conference will explicitly bring together, promote and celebrate meetings between, and differences within, the cultural and intellectual constituencies of STS. STS is located at the connexions of people, things and values. It is engaged with our sociotechnical lives and explores our interdependencies with multiple others. Preoccupations with logic and epistemology in early STS have been mixed with an intensified concern with aesthetics, values, ontologies, politics and emotions. Our conference theme promotes generative mixing through *meetings* in all senses of this word: as a practical activity, a substantive topic, a political engagement and as theoretical exploration. By doing so, we hope to open up ways to imagine how things within STS and in our social and political lives can be otherwise. We warmly welcome you to Lancaster as a meeting place for STS scholars.

Given the theme of *meetings* we have ‘un-structured’ the conference. We have identified a series of streams that have built upon the etymology of the word *meetings* in STS inflected ways. Our aim is that we will each encounter STS work in many different contexts as we seek analytic, critical and practical engagement with the theme of *meetings*. So, we invite you to think about your contribution in response to the following streams. *1. Encounters between people, things and environments* This stream has broad application in STS and contributions may focus on, for example, materialities, assemblages, the Anthropocene and changing climates, infrastructures in practice and the production and negotiation of risk. *2. Art and craft of joining and keeping things together* This stream invites a focus on doing, embodied knowledge and skills and the performativity of discourse in making and sustaining alliances. Work in this stream may therefore include: makers; engineering cultures, learning and collaborative work, and mending and repair. *3.

Confluence, collaboration and intersection* This stream invites exploration of how alignments and intersections occur. This might examine how ‘interests’ take shape, evolve, conjoin through innovation networks, technology adoption, infrastructures and standardisations; the dynamics of how social practices evolve, intersect and re-form over time; or the making of new alliances and forms of inclusive and creative collaboration. *4. Conflict, dissolution, contest* Meetings may be occasions where differences are aired, contested, bolstered or dissolved. This stream may include studies of controversy, ‘scandal’ and public dissent, organisational failure, partings, boundary making, and hierarchies. *5. Assembly, silence, dissent *Meetings may be thought of as spaces where legal, medical and/or environmental matters of concern are worked out, a place for convening publics and professionals. Contributions to this stream could explore how technologies and devices of governance assemble and sometimes silence different entities, recognising some knowledges, marginalising others, and producing unequal conditions of speech. *6. Discovery, discussion and decision* This stream offers a location for studies that explore historical and contemporary ‘moments’ of discovery and innovation, management of uncertainties and the distributedness of deliberation and ‘decisions’. These may be in, for example, the practice of health and medicine, science or urban laboratories, materialist grassroots activism, labs or processes of governance and policy making. *7. Measurement, commensuration, markets and values*

The problematisation of measurement has provided a rich seam of work across many fields of STS, for example, in the context of financial markets or the construction of ‘evidence’ in ‘evidence based medicine’. This stream invites analyses of the instruments of measurement, the values they carry, what they make visible and what they erase. Submissions *Open panel submissions* This year we move away from tracks and are instead organising the conference by the seven streams listed above, with an additional open stream. In the first instance, we invite colleagues to submit panel proposals indicating which stream they fit within. These panels will comprise a maximum of two 90-minute sessions, comprising a maximum of eight presentations. After decisions have been made as to which panel proposals are accepted, there will be an open call for paper proposals to these panels. Panel conveners will review and accept papers for inclusion within their panel, within guidelines set by the Programme Committee. Members of the Programme Committee will be responsible for overseeing a specific stream and will try to reallocate all abstracts submitted to that stream not accepted within existing panels or proposed to a ‘general’ panel. *Special ‘workshop’ proposals* In addition to open panel proposals, we also invite you to submit proposals for special workshops, involving some element of performance, which might entail practical activities or be a workshop. Given their nature, these ‘workshops’ may be closed rather than open. *Participation* Given the growing size of EASST conferences and the desire to be as inclusive as possible, individuals may be listed for a paper presentation and one other role (such as session convenor, chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances. *Facilities* The panel rooms will have a computer, a connected projector, and the facility to plug in laptops if presenters need to do so. Requests for video conferencing, speakers, etc can be made when proposing papers. /*

The conference sub-site and panel proposal form will follow in September.*/ Key dates (subject to change) *08/11/2017*: Deadline for panel (and workshop) proposals *08/12/2017*: Communication of accepted panels, opening of CFP *14/02/2018*: Deadline for individual paper abstract submissions (end of CFP) 14/03/2018: Accepted papers published on the website and registration opens 16/05/2018: Early-bird registration ends – prices rise! 25/06/2018: Publication of conference programme Local organising committee Brian Bloomfield (Centre for Science Studies/ Department for Organization, Work and Technology) Dawn Goodwin (Centre for Science Studies/Division of Medicine) (Co-chair of Programme Committee) Adrian Mackenzie (Centre for Science Studies/Department of Sociology/Data Science Institute) Nils Markusson (Lancaster Environment Centre) Maggie Mort (Centre for Science Studies/Department of Sociology) Celia Roberts (Centre for Science Studies/Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies/Department of Sociology) Vicky Singleton (Centre for Science Studies/Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies/Department of Sociology) (Co-chair) Bron Szerszynski (Centre for the Study of Environmental Change /Department of Sociology) Richard Tutton (Centre for Science Studies/Department of Sociology/Institute for Social Futures) (Co-chair) Gordon Walker (Lancaster Environment Centre/ESRC DEMAND) (Co-chair of Programme Committee) Claire Waterton (Centre for the Study of Environmental Change/Department of Sociology) Lisa Wood (Centre for Science Studies/Division of Medicine) The city Lancaster is small enough to explore on foot and there are regular bus services linking the city with the campus and with the local area, including the Lake District. Lancaster was designated a Cycling Town in 2005 and has a network of linked cycle tracks in the centre and around. The River Lune and the Lancaster Canal run through the centre. Lancaster has numerous historic buildings including the Castle c1150 (a site of witch trials in 1612 and a jail until 2012) and The Priory c1094.

The long standing connection with Quakerism is one of the inspirations for the theme of the conference. The Quakers, also known as The Religious Society of Friends, has its roots in 17C England, when small groups of ‘Seekers’ in towns and villages around the country coalesced around the informal leadership of George Fox. Early Quakers rejected professional priests, and held all life and all places to be equally sacred. They met in each other’s homes, and later in purpose-built ‘meeting houses’ where they waited silently for the Holy Spirit to guide them. Lancaster’s Friends Meeting House was built in 1708 and George Fox spent two years imprisoned in Lancaster Castle for his religious and social dissent and his preaching at The Priory. There are a variety of cultural activities related to science and technology in Lancaster including a Visitor Centre at the nearby Heysham Power Station. STS scholars at Lancaster have long been associated with local activism on technoscientific issues, for example around Cumbrian hill sheep farmers and the effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident (1986), the effects of Foot and Mouth Disease (2001) and currently in relation to contestations over fracking. Lancaster has a wealth of restaurants and public houses, many in picturesque locations such as the canal side. There is also an award winning local brewery and a thriving shopping scene, with many independent shops. The bustling Charter Market is in the city’s historic centre every Wednesday and Saturday, and the Assembly Rooms is worth a visit to browse the eclectic mix of stalls selling vintage, period and retro clothing, comic books, art and memorabilia.

V annual meeting of Chilean STS network

January 17 2018 to January 19 2018 | Universidad ​ ​ Católica ​ ​ del ​ ​ Maule, ​ ​ sede ​ ​ Curicó

Deadline: October 31 2017

http://www.cts-chile.cl/ya-estan-disponibles-los-ejes-tematicos-de-v-encuentro-red-cts-chile

Updated: September 17 2017

We are inviting to send your proposals to our annual meeting entitled: “Plowing technological fields: ruptures and amalgams around the territorial tracts”. From 17 to 19 January of 2018 the STS discussion will be in one of typical agrarian places of the country and we are receiving proposals in English, Spanish and Portuguese until 31 October.

Technology, Mind, and Society

April 05 2018 to April 07 2018 | Washington, D.C.,

Deadline: October 20 2017

http://www.apascience.org/conference/index.html

Updated: September 17 2017

The American Psychological Association will hold an interdisciplinary conference on Technology, Mind, and Society in Washington, D.C., on April 5- 7, 2018. Scientists, practitioners, policymakers, and students from around the world are invited to participate in the event. The conference will provide a venue for reporting and assessing current efforts to understand and shape the interactions of human beings and technology, for identifying priorities for future work, and for promoting exchange and collaboration among participants. The conference will feature four keynote speakers: Cynthia Breazeal (MIT), Justine Cassell (Carnegie Mellon), Eric Horvitz (Microsoft Research), and Sandy Pentland (MIT). APA invites you and your colleagues and students to submit papers, symposia, and posters for this conference, which will be organized around the following broad themes: Basic research: How humans understand and use technology, impacts of technology on human experience and behavior, human-technology interactions as mutually adaptive systems, role of technology in advancing other areas of scientific research, and related topics. Foundations of technology design: Development of technologies informed by psychological, behavioral, and social science research. Applications: Development, use, and impact of specific technologies in domains such as aging, education, mental and physical health, recreation, and the workplace. www.apascience.org/conference/index.html


Broader implications: Ethical and policy questions concerning the opportunities and challenges arising from human-technology interactions. The deadline for submissions is October 20, 2017. Submissions can be made here. The conference is open to researchers, professionals, and students in all relevant areas, including psychology and other behavioral and social sciences, neuroscience, computer science, engineering, design, health research, education research, city and regional planning, public policy, history of science and technology, and philosophy. The conference aims to address the full range of contemporary and emerging technologies. These include but are not limited to artificial intelligence, robotics, mobile devices, social media, virtual/augmented reality, gaming, geographic information systems, autonomous vehicles, and biomedical technologies (e.g., brain-machine interfaces, genetic engineering). APA is sponsoring the conference in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and the Association for Computing Machinery — Special Interest Group for Computer-Human Interaction (ACM SIGCHI). We look forward to seeing you at the Technology, Mind, and Society Conference! For additional information, see the conference website. If you have any questions, please contact the APA Science Directorate (science@apa.org).

World War I and the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council:  A Research Competition

Deadline: November 30 2017

http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3761661/WWI-and-the-NAS-NRC

Updated: September 17 2017

The National Academy of Sciences is a private tax-exempt corporation that provides expert advice on some of the most pressing challenges facing the nation and the world. Our work helps shape sound policies, inform public opinion, and advance the pursuit of science, engineering, and medicine. President Lincoln signed a congressional charter forming the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1863 to "investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science." As science began to play an ever-increasing role in national priorities and public life, the National Academy of Sciences eventually expanded to include the National Research Council (NRC) in 1916, National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1964, and National Academy of Medicine (NAM), which was established in 1970 as the Institute of Medicine. These entities are collectively referred to as The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (the National Academies). Request for Proposals On the occasion of the centennial of World War I, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are pleased to announce an open competition for scholars under the age of 301

to research and write a scholarly paper on a major aspect of how scientists and engineers in the United States were engaged in the World War I effort (see https://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/ww1/index.htm). The focus, drawing on the creation of the National Research Council associated with World War I, is on institutional changes (e.g., the charter of the NRC) and the research enterprise in America. In effect, scholars should look at how the war experience shaped long-term relationships among scientists and engineers and U.S. policymakers regarding national security and public welfare. (For a brief account of the NAS/NRC in the context of World War I visit https://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/pga_180900). A short bibliography of essential texts on the history of the NAS/NRC and a link to a finding aid for relevant materials in the archives of the National Academy of Sciences are available at https://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/pga_180902. Qualified scholars should submit, by November 30, 2017, a 500-word concept document that describes the scope of the proposed research. In addition, applicants should provide a list of possible primary sources of evidence to be used in the proposed research (one page maximum). The five best entries will be chosen by an NAS review committee (see https://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/pga_180901), and authors will be invited to submit a fully developed research paper. Upon acceptance of the invitation, invitees will enter into an agreement with NAS to provide a final paper of between 8,000 and 10,000 words2 by September 10, 2018. They will be provided with a grant of $5,000.00 for research expenses and invited to utilize the NAS’ records under the mentorship of NAS’ professional archivists.3 The scholars will be expected to present a 20-minute summary of major research findings at a public conference at the NAS in Washington, DC on October 26, 2018.4 Additional discussants and participants will be included in the public event. The review committee will subsequently deliberate and announce the winner of a $10,000.00 first prize. Payment of the $5,000.00 research grant will be made in two installments. An initial award of $2,500.00 will be made to finalists upon receipt of a signed copy of an award acknowledgement and verification of mailing address. A second award of $2,500.00 will be disbursed to finalists upon receipt by the review committee of a satisfactory progress report by July 1, 2018. The overall prize winner will receive an additional $10,000.00. The disbursement of any prize amount will be reported as gross income to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) at the end of the tax year on IRS Form 1099. The NAS’ legal obligation is limited to the above-stated amounts, and the NAS will have no responsibility for costs incurred beyond this amount. The review panel will seek to facilitate the publication of final papers in an appropriate venue. Application Process and Selection Criteria: The competition is open to scholars born after November 12, 1988. Individual scholars and research teams of not more than two individuals may apply.5

Although the topic is fundamentally historical,

submissions from the perspective of any relevant scholarly discipline are encouraged. 500-word concept documents and a list of the primary sources of evidence to be used in the proposed research (one-page maximum) must be submitted on the web at http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3761661/WWI-and-the-NAS-NRC by midnight (U.S. Eastern Standard Time) on November 30, 2017. Authors of concept proposals and of final invited papers will be asked to sign a statement certifying that they are the original author of submitted documents. Upon submission, invited papers will be automatically screened for potential plagiarism. Should plagiarism be discovered, the author(s) will be disqualified. Authors of invited papers must submit an interim progress report to the review panel by midnight (U.S. Eastern Daylight Time) on July 1, 2018. Invited final, full papers must be submitted as electronic Word documents to www1@nas.edu by midnight (U.S. Eastern Daylight Time) on September 10, 2018.

New issue of Tecnologia e Sociedad/Technology and Society Journal (September-December 2017)

https://periodicos.utfpr.edu.br/rts/index

Updated: September 15 2017

The September-December issue of Tecnologia e Sociedade, the journal of the Brazilian Association for the Social Studies of Science and Technology (ESOCITE-BR), is now out!

The journal is open access. See the content of the current issue and previous issues at: https://periodicos.utfpr.edu.br/rts/index

In the spirit of broader internalization for our next 4S meeting in Sydney, it would be great to receive manuscripts from different regions of the world. Submissions to this journal can be written in Portuguese, Spanish, English and French.

Sociology and Anthropology of Logic: Past and Present

June 21 2018 to June 22 2018 | Vichy, France

Deadline: November 01 2017

http://www.uni-log.org/wk6-anthropologic

Updated: September 12 2017

The workshop “sociology and anthropology of logic: past and present” intends to explore the various ways in which logic can be approached from a sociological or anthropological point of view. We will look into how various actors and peoples concretely define and practice logic. Logic will not be apprehended according to a fixed definition of what it is or what it should be in order to assess their various definitions and practices. Instead, we will analyze their possible plurality. We will focus on both past and present definitions and practices of logic. Historical investigations are welcome. In particular, we will discuss how philosophy and history of logic might benefit from various methodological approaches developed by historians and sociologists of mathematics and science over the past 40 years.

The organizers have contributed to this endeavor in various ways. In particular, Claude Rosental has been studying contemporary logical demonstrations from a sociological point of point. As for Julie Brumberg-Chaumont, she launched a program called “Homo Logicus, Logic at the Edges of Humanity: Anthropological, Philosophical and Historical Approaches” with Antonella Romano at EHESS in Paris in 2016, and another program called “Social History of Logic in the Middle Ages” with John Marenbon (Trinity College, Cambridge) in 2017.

The anthropological dimension of logic may be observed, for example, in the debates that Lévy-Bruhl’s notion of “pre-logical mentality” of indigenous peoples has generated for more than a century. Anthropologists and other actors have often referred to logical skills to define the boundaries of humanity. Depending on their more or less open definitions of logic, they have included a limited or a large number of humans within these boundaries. Testing codified logical skills — Aristotelian and traditional logic in the past, thinking skill assessment (TSA) today – has been used since the Middle Ages as a way to select individuals in higher education institutions and/or as a means for excluding “logically disabled” groups in relationship to their so-called “social or racial inferiority.” A sociological approach to the history of logic implies that logic is not only a set of theories and doctrines, but also a tool for action that individuals use in different institutional, political, and social settings.

Several authors have contributed to approaching logic this way. For instance, David Bloor’s work inspired Irving Anellis and Ivo Grattan-Guiness’ criticisms of the notion of “Fregean revolution.” The “social history of logic” program developed by Volker Peckaus and Christian Thiel in the 1980s also illustrates this trend.

Papers are expected to cover one of the following topics:

-Logic and the Boundaries of Humanity -Social Studies of Logic -Anthropological History of Logic -Selecting Humans Based on their Logical Skills -Ethnologic and Ethnomathematics -History of Logic and History of Anthropology

Abstracts (one page) should be sent by October 20, 2017 (extended deadline) via e-mail to: brumberg@vjf.cnrs.fr

Workshop organized by Julie Brumberg-Chaumont (LEM/CNRS/PSL, Paris Research University) and Claude Rosental (CEMS/IMM/CNRS/EHESS/PSL).


Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Africana Studies and Environmental Studies, Williams College

http://apply.interfolio.com/44005

Updated: September 12 2017

The Program in Africana Studies and the Program in Environmental Studies at Williams College invite applications for a two-year joint post-doctoral fellowship in Africana Studies and Environmental Studies, beginning July 1, 2018. We welcome applications from candidates who have completed their PhD within the last five years and also those who have not yet completed their PhD, but will have the PhD in hand by the start date of the appointment.

We seek a candidate whose work examines the impact of climate change on populations in Africa and the African Diaspora. Candidates might hold expertise in any number of disciplinary or methodological approaches so long as they situate and center the implications of the climate change phenomenon upon Black communities. The position requires vision, initiative, and a desire to join our vibrant community of scholars, practitioners, and activists. Williams is an institution that places a high value on undergraduate teaching; consequently, we strongly prefer applicants who can demonstrate in their supporting materials a capacity for excellent teaching and who have a commitment to working effectively with a student population that is broadly diverse with regard to gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and religion.

The successful candidate will be appointed full-time for a term of two years and will have a teaching load of one course each semester. The salary for this position is $55,000 per year plus an allowance of $3,000 per year for research and professional travel expenses. The fellow will also be provided with full benefits including health and dental insurance. This position is made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Information about the Williams College Program in Africana Studies is available at https://africana-studies.williams.edu/. Information about the Williams Program in Environmental Studies is available at https://ces.williams.edu/. Applications should be submitted via Interfolio (http://apply.interfolio.com/44005) and should include:

- a cover letter;
- c.v.;
- a one to two page statement describing your teaching and research;
- a writing sample of no more than 25 pages;
- a transcript from your doctoral program;
- at least three letters of reference

Completed applications submitted by Wednesday, November 1, 2017, will receive full consideration.

All offers of employment are contingent upon completion of a background check. Further information is available here: http://dean-faculty.williams.edu/prospective-faculty/background-check-policy

Fax and email applications will not be accepted. Inquiries should be sent both to James.Manigault-Bryant@williams.edu and Ralph.M.Bradburd@Williams.edu.

Williams College is a coeducational liberal arts institution located in the Berkshire Hills of western Massachusetts. The college has built its reputation on outstanding teaching and scholarship and on the academic excellence of its approximately 2,000 students. Please visit the Williams College website (http://www.williams.edu). Beyond meeting fully its legal obligations for non- discrimination, Williams College is committed to building a diverse and inclusive community where members from all backgrounds can live, learn, and thrive.

International Conference on Environmental Humanities

July 03 2018 to July 08 2018 | Universidad de Alcalá

http://www.institutofranklin.net/en/events/international-conference-on-environmental-humanities/

Updated: August 11 2017

Stories, Myths, and Arts to Envision a Change

Environmental humanities entail a transdisciplinary and transnational critical framework that is rapidly emerging in the last decade. This framework challenges traditional divisions among human, social, and environmental sciences, since they have proven to be obsolete in confronting, understanding, and articulating the most pressing social, cultural, and environmental challenges of the 21st century, as well as their multiple scales, risks, and representational difficulties. Environmental humanities emerge out of the convergence among environmental history and philosophy, ecocriticism, art and ecology, de-/post-colonial environmental thinking, earth systems science, philosophy of science, social and political ecology, ecofeminism, and so on. This international conference attempts to contribute to this fascinating debate while introducing it in Spain, where it has not yet been established.

Call for Papers: Digital Humanities

Deadline: December 01 2017

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/dlp

Updated: August 11 2017

The Shifting Contexts Digital Library Perspectives

This special edition of Digital Library Perspectives focuses on the topic of Digital Humanities, with emphasis on the shifting framework of scholars and practitioners who do not necessarily identify themselves digital humanists but use Digital Humanities tools and practices in their work. The Guest Editors of this issue include Dr. Megan Meredith-Lobay (University of British Columbia) and Allan Cho (University of British Columbia).

The co-editors invite contributions on the following, as well as other related topics:

* Role of LIS in supporting non-traditional DH areas of scholarship, i.e. New Media Studies, Musicology, Archaeology, non-textual DH

* Emerging areas of research, teaching, learning in the digital scholarship in the social sciences and humanities

* Beyond “What is DH?” - exploring “Why DH?”

* Non-traditional DH practice and practitioners: inclusion and exclusion

* DH in non-western contexts

* The intersections between DH and digital social science

* Digital Humanities as Data Science

Important Dates:

Deadline for submission: December 2017

Notification of acceptance: April 2018

Deadline for final paper submission: June 2018

Submission Instructions:

Papers should be no more than 6000 words

Submissions to Digital Library Perspectives are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system. Registration for an account needs to be created first: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/dlp.

CFP: Science Studies and the Blue Humanities.

Deadline: February 01 2018

Updated: August 11 2017

Configurations, the journal of SLSA (The Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts) is seeking submissions for a special issue on Science Studies and the Blue Humanities, edited by Stacy Alaimo.

We are interested in essays, position papers, provocations, and artist statements that explore the significance of science studies for the development of the blue humanities. As oceans and bodies of fresh water increasingly become sites for environmentally-oriented arts and humanities scholarship, how can the emerging blue humanities best engage with the theories, questions, paradigms, and methods of science studies? How do questions of scale, temporality, materiality, and mediation emerge in aquatic zones and modes? How can literature, art, data visualization, and digital media best respond to the rapidly developing sciences of ocean acidification and climate change as well as the less publicized concerns such as the effect of military sonar on cetaceans? Work on postcolonial/decolonial science studies, Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), indigenous sciences, and citizen science especially welcome.

Please submit 5,000-7,000 word essays; 3,000 word position papers or provocations; or 2,000 word artist statements (with one or two illustrations or a link to a digital work); to Stacy Alaimo, alaimo@uta.edu, by February 1, 2018, for consideration. All essays will be peer-reviewed, following the standard editorial procedures of Configurations.

Exploring Parallels Between Technoscientific and Social Scientific Knowledge Production

July 15 2018 to July 21 2018 | Toronto, Canada.

Deadline: September 30 2017

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/wc2018/webprogrampreliminary/Session8157.html

Updated: August 11 2017

XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology: Power, Violence and Justice. Reflections, Responses, Responsibilities. July 15-21, 2018,

Session Host: RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology Organizers: Danny Otto, University of Rostock, Germany & Jing-Mao Ho, Cornell University, USA

Sociology of Technology and Science has advanced our understanding of processes in which scientific knowledge is (re-)produced. Scholars have delved deeply into scientific practices in many areas of the natural and technical sciences. But more recently, we have found increasing scholarly interest in studying social or “soft” sciences. These publications (along with earlier work in the sociology of knowledge) point to the importance of sociological self-reflection. They reveal the entanglement of social scientists with the “objects” they are trying to describe and the implications of social scientific knowledge for the understanding of society (e.g. interpretations of social inequality). Therefore, this session aims to bring together new developments in the sociological study of “social sciences/sociologies.”

How and under what circumstances is sociological knowledge produced? How are paradigms in sociology constructed? In what ways are power relations interwoven into the manufacturing of sociological knowledge - both, on the level of enabling research (e.g. political agenda setting, funding, working conditions, academic hierarchies) and disseminating results (e.g. perceptibility, review processes, digital distribution, status of authors)? Are there any technologies that have been normalized in producing sociological knowledge? What are the characteristics of academic sociology communities? How are networks of sociology shaped by actors/actants involved?

Above are some of the questions we expect to address during the session. We welcome any papers - both theoretical and empirical - that address the issues and topics in the sociology of sociologies as well as social sciences (e.g. economics, political science, psychology. philosophy, anthropology).

Please submit your contribution proposals via the official ISA conference website: The deadline for abstract submission is September 30, 2017.

If you have any questions regarding this session, please send your enquiries to danny.otto@uni-rostock.de

Tenure-Track Assistant Professorship in Media and Culture at Stanford University

https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/9466.

Updated: August 10 2017

The Department of Communication at Stanford University seeks applications for an Assistant Professor in the field of media and culture. We are interested in a range of possible subfields, including but not limited to the relationship between mass and social media; the analysis of media institutions as cultural forces; media’s relationship to race, gender, and inequality; media and consumer culture; media industries and culture; and media and globalization. The ideal candidate will also bring strong skills in areas that might include ethnography, critical theory, digital humanities and discourse analysis. A recent PhD in Communication or relevant area by September 1, 2018 is required. The successful candidate will be expected to teach courses in
Communication at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. For full consideration, please submit a curriculum vitae, a cover letter outlining your qualifications and research interests, a teaching statement of up to three pages along with teaching evaluations, an article-length writing sample, and three letters of recommendation, via Academic Jobs Online at this URL: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/9466.

Review of applications will begin on November 1, 2017. The term of appointment will begin on September 1, 2018. For inquiries, please contact James Hamilton, Professor and Search Committee Chair, at jayth@stanford.edu.

Stanford is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

”Data work in healthcare” Special issue of Health Informatics Journal

Deadline: October 01 2017

Updated: July 09 2017

Full paper deadline: November 1st

Working with data has become increasingly become part of many healthcare professionals job and of patient-citizens’ life, and data work requires more time, new competences and skills, and leads to new functions and roles. A common phrase upon data and healthcare goes *“**Healthcare is data rich,* yet information poor”. There is a huge amount of healthcare data, but it is inherently difficult to use for analyses of healthcare processes and outcomes be it regarding patients, treatments, resources, or efficiency. The challenge of turning data into information – that is making sense of data – has increased with the digitization of healthcare that has occurred within the last decade through, for example, electronic patient records (EHR) and more recently patient reported outcome measures (PROM). The amount of data available is grown hugely, and at the same time going digital has made the accumulation, visualization and analysis of data easier. More and more different kinds of data work have emerged, and this special issue aims to put into the focus the opportunities and challenges connection with the subsequent redistribution of work, time, resources, authority, and power that follow suit.

*What is data work?* ‘Data work’ has quite never been defined in the specialist literature, and remains a slippery notion. We see it as a coinage after the word ‘paper work’, of which it represents an abstraction, with respect to the medium of data representation; but also an extension, with respect to what people manage as data of their interest (besides accounting and resource management). As such, data work is not only "working on data", typically producing new data in accounting for and recording a faithful representation of the work done and the involved phenomena at hand; but also that portion of work whose execution, articulation and appraisal deeply and intensively rely on data, i.e., "working by data". These two kinds of work are usually so deeply intertwined that distinguishing between them is useless and probably wrong: in the healthcare domain, the studies by Berg (Berg 1999), for instance, clearly show that clinicians record data on the patient record not only to accumulate data for archival reasons (and for many other secondary uses), but also to coordinate with each other, articulate the resources around a medical case, and take informed decision in a written, distributed communication with themselves and the other colleagues taking care of the same patient. In healthcare, data work regards the additional effort paid by caregivers in making the record a “working record” (Fitzpatrick 2004), that is a resource capable of keeping disparate competencies and roles bound together and connected around the same cases over time and space.

However, the concept of ‘data work’ can facilitate descriptions and analysis of activities and tasks connected with generating, cooking, transforming, representing, comprehending, ect. in order to bring forward the new skills and competences demanded by healthcare professionals and patient-citizens alike, as well as the shifts in resources, authority, and power that this enables and entails. As such, data work can serve as an analytical lens to make visible these kinds of efforts or work, much in the same way that Strauss proposed the concepts of ‘articulation work’ and ‘machine work’ to make visible the efforts of aligning and coordinating tasks and work, or the efforts of assembling, adjusting, and connecting machines and patients in healthcare (Strauss et al. 1985). *Digitization of healthcare and the generation of data* The emergence of large-scale information infrastructures in healthcare (IIHI has enabled the use of health data for a range of new purposes related to data-driven management, accountability, and performance resource management as well as providing a new source and foundation for healthcare and medical research data.

For example, EHRs are increasingly expected to become ‘meaningful audit tools’ by general practitioners (Winthereik et al. 2007). Expectations are developing for the types and depth of biomedical and organizational research that can be using second order data from these systems. Hence, healthcare data are expected to support inquiries such as: What drugs work best for which subgroup of patients with a certain diagnosis? How can operating rooms most optimally be staffed and used? How can IIHs be used as a foundation for data-driven management? The proliferation of tools and consulting services that promise to make healthcare organizations “data-driven”, are rapidly shifting the organization and management of healthcare practice, and the socio-technical setup is reconfigured, from in situ, socially negotiated practice to seemingly objective, rational, and scientific logics on an institutional scale. Hence, there is a pressing need to explore how healthcare data and data-driven management contributes to this reconfiguration. How is the role of medical professions changing? How is the nature of the professional expertise changing, and what are the implications for the autonomy and discretion long enjoyed by clinicians? Along similar lines, external actors such as the general public, accreditation, and state authorities increasingly demand that healthcare organizations become more transparent and accountable by providing data through performances measures (Pine and Mazmanian 2014). This is spurred by a demand to see that healthcare organizations deliver services of high quality and according to the best healthcare standards (Christensen and Ellingsen, 2014) while using funding and resources most efficiently. Healthcare organizations and individual clinicians are evaluated according to metrics that assess care delivery, such as: Are patients diagnosed with cancer treated within the stipulated time? Which ward or hospital is most cost- and resource-effective? Amidst these high stakes come concerns about the situated practices of making, managing, and using data. The creation, maintenance, aggregation, transport, and re-purposing of data does not happen without work effort to collect and transform data.

‘Raw Data is an Oxymoron’, a bad idea and should be cooked with care, as Bowker succinctly stated (Bowker 2005). With the emergence of IIH and the increasing demand for data-driven management, accountability and increased performance, the importance and character of working with, by and upon data increases. Themes for the special issue Topics relevant for this special issue include, but are not limited to, the following: · *The new work of healthcare data*: What are the new competences, tasks, and functions that the emergence of data-driven healthcare entails? How are existing occupations and professions changing in the wake of the push for data-driven healthcare? · *The new ‘data work’ of patients: *What does it involve to be enrolled or engaged in the generation, distribution, understanding of data on one’s health, and have such data come back to you filtered and interpreted by other parties that base interventions for you on those data? · *The politics of creating and using healthcare data*: How do categories, classifications and algorithms shape what counts as data, and what do these schemes make visible and invisible? ·

*Artefacts and infrastructures as knowledge production*: Artefacts enter and shape the processes of knowledge production according to their own characteristics and entail their own epistemological implications and shape knowledge forms. · *Reflection, management and accountability*: What instances of reflection, management and accountability are created with specific healthcare IT systems? What are the challenges, conflicts, and opportunities? · *Systems design: *How do the agendas of data for accountability and secondary uses influence and become integrated into systems design and development? Is this a simple add-on, or a dominant concern? What is the role of health informatics research?

*Important dates:* Important dates: Abstract October 1st; Full paper November 1st; 1st Notification January 15th; revised submissions March 15th; Final notification April 15th; Camera-ready papers May 1st.

Publication: Mid-2018 *Manuscript Format:* Please check the website for guidelines upon formatting of your manuscript ( https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/journal/health-informatics-journal# submission-guidelines). Your manuscript should be between 3000 and 4000 words long (excl. references). Please also supply an abstract of 100-150 words, and up to five keywords, arranged in alphabetical order. Mark your submission “Special issue on Data work in healthcare” in the manuscript header as well as in the submission letter.

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA)

April 03 2018 to April 07 2018 | Philadelphia, PA,

Deadline: October 15 2017

www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/

Updated: July 09 2017

"Sustainable Futures" invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 78th Annual Meeting

The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution. We welcome papers from all disciplines. The deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2017. For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page (www.sfaa.net/annual- meeting/).

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) i

April 03 2018 to April 07 2018 | Philadelphia, PA,

Deadline: October 15 2017

www.sfaa.net/annual- meeting

Updated: June 12 2017

Invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 78th Annual Meeting The theme of the Program is “Sustainable Futures.” The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution. We welcome papers from all disciplines. For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page.

GROUP 2018 ACM International Conference on Supporting Group Work

January 07 2018 to January 10 2018 | Sanibel Island, Florida, USA

http://www.acm.org/confe rences/group/conferences/group18

Updated: June 08 2017


Deadlines: Multiple

General Information For over 25 years, the ACM International Conference on Supporting Group Work (GROUP) has been a premier venue for research on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human Computer Interaction, Computer Supported Collaborative Learning and Socio - Technical Studies. The conference integrates work in social science, computer science, engineering, design, values, and other diverse topics related to group work, broadly conceptualized .
Group 201 8 continues the tradition of being tru ly international and interdisciplinary in both organizational structure as well as participants. Key goals for the program are to encourage and facilitate researchers within CSCW and HCI to interact across disciplinary boundaries. We encourage high - level research contributions from interdisciplinary groups to pres ent work that might be difficult to place within one simple category. We are open to diverse and innovative research methods, and to contributions across broad areas such as systems, so ciety, participation, critique, collaboration, and human interaction. GROUP 201 8 in particular would like to enc ourage systems designers, builders, and researchers from industry, academia , government and other interested groups to participate. Partici pati on at GROUP takes many different forms. In 2018, we will continue two new submissions categories that were introduced in 2016.

First, GROUP 2018 will again offer the opportunity to authors of newly published papers from the Journal of CSCW ( http://link.springer.com/journal/10606 ) to present their papers in the conference. Second, the submission category “Design Fictions” will be maintained. Submissions to the conference are welcome in the form of:
● Research Papers (both short and long). This venue gives the occasion to present and interact with the audience. Accepted papers will be published in the Conference Proceedings and ACM Digital Library. Please use the ACM S IGCHI format for submissions. We invite archival submissions in the form of either full Papers or shorter contributions (Notes). A Note is a brief report of a more limited, b ut definitive, outcome or theoretical development. There is no page limit for Papers or Notes, although clear rationale should be given for Papers that exceed 10 pages o r for Notes that exceed 4 pages . Research Paper submissions must be completed online at the GROUP 2018 conference site: https://precisionconference.com/~group/
• Work ing Papers (WP). WPs are contributions in which the authors are working towards an archival journal submission and would like to discuss their work with their colleagues at GROUP. Our goal is to broaden the conversations at GROUP, with a format that may appeal to colleagues w hose primary publications are in journals, rather than conference papers. WPs will not be published in the conference proceedings, but will be distributed in a paper conference supplement at the GROUP conference for the attendees only. Therefore, you are f ree to seek formal publication of a draft journal submission that appears in a WP. The WP review process will be *lightweight*, without any revisions asked to the authors, to expand the GROUP community and discussions. Please send submissions directly to c o - chairs at w p @group201 8 .org.
● Design Fictions – Fictive Futures: Exploring Future Research Agendas . We seek submissions that imagine possible futures for research on the relationships between computers and people. Submissions will include two portions: a fictional document related to the conduct of research and an author statement about the document. The fiction document could be an extended abstract, a call for papers, an excerpt from API documentation, a book review, a study protocol for IRB review, or any other relevant type. The author statement should connect that document to current events, cite on - going research in the field, or otherwise extrapolate how the envisioned future might arise from our given present. This statement will be especially important for abstracts (which are too short to explain their rationale), API documentations (which typica lly do not provide a historical rationale), and other documents that on their own may be exceptionally short and/or vague. Because Design Fictions are archival contributions, we recommend a minimum length of 3 pages, and as many as 10 pages. Please use the ACM SIGCHI Format for submissions. The reviewing process will be the same as the general track, and Design Fiction papers or notes will be included in the proceedings. Design Fiction submissions must be co mpleted online at the GROUP 2018 conference site: https://precisionconference.com/~group/ ● Posters and demos . Posters and demos are an opportunity to present late - breaking and preliminary results, small er results not suitable for a Paper or Note submission, innovative ideas not yet validated through user studies, student research in early phases, and other research best presented in this open format. Posters and demos will be displayed at a special sessi on in the conference when poster and demo authors will be available to discuss their work. Poster submissions should include an extended abstract no longer than 4 pages, including all figures and references, in ACM SIGCHI Format ( available here ). In addition, submissions should also include a separate Tabloid (A3 or 11 x 17 inches) sized draft of the poster for review purposes. Both the extended abstract and the poster draft should include aut hor names (these are not anonymous submissions). Please send submissions directly to co - chairs at posters@group201 8 .org.
● Workshops . Workshops provide an informal and focused environment for the information exchange and discussion of Group related topic s. We offer half or full day workshop venues. Proposals should include an abstract (max 150 words), a title, description of workshop theme, aim, goals, activities and potential outcomes. Workshop proposals should also include a description of how the works hop will be publicized and a strategy for recruiting and selecting participants. It should specify any audio/visual equipment needed, maximum number of participants, the duration of the workshop (half or full day) and the names and backgrounds of the organizer(s). Please submit a maximum of four pages, using the ACM SIGCHI format for submissions.

We encourage opics suitable for developing new ideas and deep discussions. Please send submissions directly to co - chairs at workshops@group201 8 .org. ● Doctoral Colloquium . The Doctoral Colloquium provides a forum for sharing ongoing Ph.D . projects of participants with other advanced Ph.D. students and distinguished faculty for mentoring and feedback. Space is limited, so an application of up to four pages is required, in the ACM standa rd format . Please contact the workshop co - chairs at dc@group201 8 .org. Accepted research papers, notes, Design Fictions, posters, and doctoral consortium extended abstracts are pu blished in the ACM Press Conference Proceedings and in the ACM digital Library. Accepted Workshop proposals will be published in a paper - based supplement. Conference Topics: ● Theoretical and/or conceptual contributions about key concepts relevant to CSCW and HCI, including critique. ● Social, behavioral, and computational studies of collaboration and communication. ● Technical architectures supporting collaboration. ● New tool/toolkits for collaborative technologies. ● Ethnographic studies of collaborative p ractices. ● Coordination and workflow technology. ● Social computing and contexts of collaboration. ● Online communities, including issues of privacy, identity, trust, and participation. ● Cooperative knowledge management. ● Organizational issues of technology design, use, or adaptation. ● Strategies for use of technology in business, government, and newer forms of organizations. ● Emerging technologies and their design, use, or appropriation in work, home, leisure, entertainment, or education. ● Learning at the workp lace (CSCL at work, Technology - Enhanced Learning, TEL). ● Co - located and geographically - distributed teams, global collaboration. ● Cultural and cross - cultural collaboration and communication. ● Mobile and wearable technologies in collaboration. ● Innovative forms of human computer interaction for cooperative technologies. Important

Dates Papers and Notes Abstract and Title Submission:
June 23, 2017 Papers and Notes Submission Deadline: July 1, 2017 Papers and Notes De cisions Announced: September 15 , 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Design Fictions Submission Deadline: July 1, 2017 Design Fictions Decisions Announced: September 15, 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Doctoral Colloquium Appli cations Deadline: July 10, 2017 Doctoral Colloquium D ecisions Announced: September 15, 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Workshop Proposals Deadline: July 14 , 2017 Workshop Proposals Deci s ions Announced: Friday, July 2 8 , 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Workshop Participants Papers Deadline(s): Oct/Nov 2017 , may vary per workshop Posters/Demos Deadline: September 18, 2017 Posters/Demos Decisions Announced: October 16, 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Working Papers (WP) Deadline: Oct 2, 2017 Working Papers Decisions Announced: October 27, 2017 Conference dates: January 7 - 10 , 201 8

If you have questions, please contact the conference organizers: General Chairs: Andrea Forte, Drexel University chairs@group2018.org or visit: http://group.acm.org/conferences/group18/CFP.pdf

Technologies of Frankenstein

March 07 2018 to March 09 2018 | Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, USA

Deadline: October 19 2017

http://frankenstein2018.org/

Updated: June 08 2017



The 200th anniversary year of the first edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: Or, The Modern Prometheus has drawn worldwide interest in revisiting the novel’s themes. What were those themes and what is their value to us in the early twenty-first century? Mary Shelley was rather vague as to how Victor, a young medical student, managed to reanimate a person cobbled together from parts of corpses. Partly as a result of this technical gap, and partly as a result of many other features of the novel, Frankenstein continues to inspire discourse in scholarly, popular, and creative culture about the Monstrous, the Outsider, the Other, and scientific ethics. This conference will examine such connections in our thinking about humanism and techno-science from the novel’s publication to the present. We construe broadly the intersecting themes of humanism, technology, and science and we welcome proposals from all fields of study for presentations that add a twenty-first century perspective to Frankenstein. Topic areas may include but are not limited to:

 Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

 Branding “Frankenstein” (Food, Comics, Gaming, Music, Theater, Film)

 Computational and Naval Technology (Mapping, Navigation, The Idea of the Journey)

 Digital Humanities and GeoHumanities (Applications, Pedagogy, Library/Information

Technology)

 Engineering Technologies: Past/Present/Future (Chemical, Electrical, Biomedical)

 Future Technologies and Labor Concerns

Submit abstracts of 300 words and brief CV by 15 October 2017 to Michael Geselowitz (mgeselowitz@ieee.org) and Robin Hammerman (rhammerm@stevens.edu).

Agriculture and Food Research Initiative - Foundational Program

Deadline: June 01 2017

https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-and-food-research-initiative-foundational-program

Updated: April 16 2017

The AFRI Foundational Program supports grants in the six AFRI priority areas to continue building a foundation of knowledge critical for solving current and future societal challenges. The six priority areas are: Plant Health and Production and Plant Products; Animal Health and Production and Animal Products; Food Safety, Nutrition, and Health; Bioenergy, Natural Resources, and Environment; Agriculture Systems and Technology; and Agriculture Economics and Rural Communities. Single-function Research Projects, multi-function Integrated Projects, and Food and Agricultural Science Enhancement (FASE) Grants are expected to address one of the Program Area Priorities (see Foundational Program RFA for details).

Posted Date: Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Closing Date: Sunday, September 30, 2018
Other Due Date: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies - Letter of Intent required
Letter of Intent Deadline - June 1, 2017
| Critical Agricultural Research and Extension - Letter of Intent required
Letter of Intent Deadline - May 24, 2017
| Exploratory Research - Letter of Intent required
Letter of Intent (LOI) is accepted anytime throughout the year; See Part IV, A. for instructions.
| Application Deadline Dates
See Program Area Priorities for additional information (See Part I, C.).

For More Information Contact: AFRI Coordination Team
Contact for Electronic Access Problems: electronic@nifa.usda.gov (link sends e-mail)
Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-NIFA-AFRI-006351
CFDA number: 10.310

New Edited Volume from Hindmarsh and Priestley, The Fukushima Effect: A New Geopolitical Terrain

https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138830783

Updated: February 04 2016

The Fukushima Effect: A New Geopolitical Terrain (2016, Routledge)
Edited by Richard Hindmarsh, Rebecca Priestley

The Fukushima Effect offers a range of scholarly perspectives on the international effect of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown four years out from the disaster. Grounded in the field of science, technology and society (STS) studies, a leading cast of international scholars from the Asia-Pacific, Europe, and the United States examine the extent and scope of the Fukushima effect. The authors each focus on one country or group of countries, and pay particular attention to national histories, debates and policy responses on nuclear power development covering such topics as safety of nuclear energy, radiation risk, nuclear waste management, development of nuclear energy, anti-nuclear protest movements, nuclear power representations, and media representations of the effect. The countries featured include well established ‘nuclear nations’, emergent nuclear nations and non-nuclear nations to offer a range of contrasting perspectives.

Call for Reviews: Volumen 5 (1): “Science, Technology, Society – and the Americas?”

Deadline: December 15 2015

http://www.crolar.org/about

Updated: November 06 2015

Technological and scientific innovations affect society. How would you access, read and process this call for CROLAR if not on a computer screen? Through webpages, email, and social networks, we are able to distribute information in an instant, to connect with people across spatial and social boundaries, to maintain personal bonds and to create collectives that transcend the online/offline division. At the same time, technological and scientific innovations also dissolve collectivity and dis-connect people. New and old forms of exclusion and discrimination are (re-)produced along the lines of age, gender, race, class, or geographical location. Re/configurations of the social through science and technology have been studied for a wide range of subjects – from the mundane world of domestic appliances such as Cowan’s “Where the Refrigerator Got its Hum” (Cowan 1985), through to the futuristic public transport project of Latour’s Aramis (Latour 1996), all the way to “Seeing like a Rover” on Mars (Vertesi 2012). Beginning with the work of Robert Merton in the 1940s in which he analysed science as a social institution (Merton 1973), this field has since developed into a heterogeneous set of studies focusing on the various relations between science and technology, and society.

Instead of assuming that innovations or paradigmatic changes occur out of nothing, these scholars increasingly combine perspectives from the fields of anthropology, sociology, political science, philosophy, history and communication studies to account for the complex constellations of actors behind processes such as scientific ‘discoveries’ and technological inventions. Criticising and adding to these perspectives, feminist and postcolonial authors like Donna Haraway, Karen Barad, Helen Verran, and Sandra Harding have pointed us to the power-asymmetries and unequal distributions of agency amongst those actors. In the meantime, Latin America was developing its own studies into the rapport between society and science and technologies, spurred by scientists and engineers concerned with the disconnect between the knowledge being produced locally and the influence and pressures from the global North (Kreimer 2007). More recently, research concerned with social inequality in Latin America has developed new concepts such as “social technologies” (tecnologías sociales), technologies dedicated to resolving social or environmental problems (Thomas 2011). Perhaps ironically, research such as Thomas’ and other Latin-American authors’ are outnumbered in mainstream academic journals of the field in favor of publications and projects that focus on social and techno-scientific processes in the US and Europe.

This Volume of CROLAR asks about the other part of the Americas: What can authors from the global North learn from the rich and long-standing tradition of research at the intersection of technology/science and social inequality, politics, or activism from or about Latin America? We are calling for reviews on recent publications that develop a critical perspective on the influence of technology and science on society – or vice versa! We are especially interested in reviews that interrogate the potential of those studies for countering social and political inequalities by making knowledges that have long-time been exclusively shared among “experts” in the natural sciences available to a broader public. In addition to traditional single-book reviews, this volume features a new CROLAR-format of review articles with a thematic focus. These reviews should cover 3-5 books on current debates or a given topic. We are also actively encouraging reviews on works that transcend the limits of academic production, aimed at a larger audience and related to current events. They will be published in the section “interventions” and may include reviews of works by journalists, activists, practitioners, artists and others. For this particular section we suggest reviewers to write about projects that do not have a book format, such as documentaries, blogs, websites and artistic projects.

Reviews must be sent before December 15th, 2015. Publication is planned for April 2016. Please get back to us as soon as possible so we can organize the volume and the ordering of review copies via CROLAR. Reviews might be written in English, German, Portuguese, or Spanish. Ideally, the review should be in a different language than the reviewed publication or project. The section policies and formal requirements for the reviews can be found at the website.

We are looking forward to reading from you! If you are interested in writing a review or have any other suggestions or questions please contact the editors of the volume: Laura Kemmer (laura.kemmer[at]fu-berlin.de) and Raquel Velho (raquel.velho.12[at]ucl.ac.uk).

About CROLAR
CROLAR is an online review journal offering critical reviews of recently published writings on Latin America, founded in July 2012 and domiciled at the Institute for Latin American Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin. It is an interdisciplinary journal embracing contributions on literary studies, history, sociology, economics, anthropology and political science. It is an open access and free to use journal. CROLAR is published twice a year and multilingual since July 2012.

Bibliography
Cowan, Ruth Schwartz. 1985. "How the refrigerator got its hum." In The Social Shaping of Technology, edited by Donald MacKenzie and Judy Wajcman, 202-218. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.

Kreimer, Pablo. 2007. "Social Studies of Science and Technology in Latin America: A Field in the Process of Consolidation." Science, Technology & Society 12 (1).

Latour, Bruno. 1996. Aramis, or, The love of technology. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Merton, Robert K. 1973. The sociology of science: Theoretical and empirical investigations: University of Chicago press.

Thomas, Hernán. 2011. "Tecnologías sociales y ciudadanía socio-técnica: notas para la construcción de la matriz material de un futuro viable." Ciência & Tecnologia Social 1 (1).

Vertesi, Janet. 2012. "Seeing like a Rover: Visualization, embodiment, and interaction on the Mars Exploration Rover Mission." Social Studies of Science 42 (3):393-414.

New Book from Bruno Cardoso: Todos os Olhos: videovigilancia voyerismos e (re)producao imagética

http://bit.ly/1HcDN9L

Updated: May 11 2015

Todos os Olhos: videovigilancia voyerismos e (re)producao imagética, by Bruno Vasconcelos Cardoso, edited for UFRJ, Brazil.

Sinopse:

Todos os olhos: videovigilâncias, voyeurismos e (re)produção imagética, livro de Bruno Vasconcelos Cardoso, acaba de ser lançado pela Editora UFRJ e aborda o fenômeno cada vez mais comum da vigilância por câmeras no espaço público urbano. Com enfoque na prática da vigilância eletrônica policial no Centro de Comando e Controle da Polícia Militar do Rio de Janeiro e na sala de monitoramento do 19º Batalhão da Polícia Militar, em Copacabana, a obra é resultado de uma pesquisa de doutorado, defendida como tese em maio de 2010.O autor, contudo, não para por aí, e analisa também o fenômeno da produção e disseminação das imagens captadas pelas câmeras privadas, como celulares e smartphones, imediatamente publicizadas nas redes sociais e nos programas de compartilhamento de imagens.No livro, Cardoso se debruça especialmente sobre as transformações na maneira como os humanos se relacionam com as imagens, com os meios técnicos que possibilitam essas relações e as estruturas de poder em que se inserem. Assim, policiamento, (in)segurança, tecnologia, imagem, comunicação, poder, crime, violência, espaço público, controle, flagrante, voyeurismo, criação e exibicionismo são os grandes temas que, inter-relacionados, perpassam o livro. A descrição rica e reflexiva que Cardoso faz de seu trabalho de campo, realizado em 2008, nos revela as surpresas, os disparates, os deslocamentos, os conflitos e os contrastes que se dão entre o projeto ideal e o efetivo trajeto da videovigilância policial em sua atividade. A pesquisa mostra também que a estética, o gozo e o prazer muitas vezes ocupam o lugar das funções de controle e segurança visados na videovigilância policial e constituem uma outra visão, denominada pelo autor de “videovoyeurismo”. Por fim, o livro mostra que enxergar pode ser não ver, e o olhar pode ser tanto mostrar quanto esconder. Ainda que transformações tenham ocorrido nesses anos que separam a publicação deste livro do início de sua pesquisa, ele permanece extremamente atual. A aquisição de um arsenal expressivo de novas tecnologias de vigilância, monitoramento e segurança (de drones a óculos com câmeras acopladas e transmissão de imagem em tempo real) para a realização da Copa do Mundo no Brasil meses atrás revela como a obra levanta e explora um campo de problemas cuja importância se intensificou. Os megaeventos são hoje uma das principais portas de entrada de dispositivos de vigilância e segurança do espaço urbano.

Inventing the Social

May 29 2014 to May 30 2014 | Goldsmiths University of London

http://goldsmithsdesignblog.com/2014/04/11/inventing-the-social/

Updated: April 23 2014

Celebrating 10 years of the Centre for the Study of Invention and Social Process Goldsmiths

This symposium celebrates the 10th year anniversary of CSISP, which quite miraculously coincides with the 50 year birthday of Goldsmiths Sociology. The event will explore the challenges associated with the 'return of the social', the pervasive suggestion that the 'social' is back, now that social media, social innovation and social design present and push themselves as objects, instruments and contexts of research and engagement. We ask: can we understand these phenomena as renewed efforts at the socialization of technology, the environment and associated entities? We are especially interested in recent claims to the effect that sociality is not only enacted, but can equally be invented, produced and generated with devices and settings. This also raises an experimental question for social and cultural research and theory themselves: how can we participate in the invention of socials?

With: Andrew Barry (UCL), Lisa Blackman (Goldsmiths), Nigel Clark (Lancaster University), Rebecca Coleman (Goldsmiths), Will Davies (Warwick University), Maarten Derksen (Universiteit Groningen), Ignacio Farias (WZB, Berlin), Carolin Gerlitz (University of Amsterdam), Michael Halewood (Essex), Anders Koed Madsen (Aalborg University Copenhagen), Bernd Kraeftner/Judith Kroell (Vienna), Daniel Lopez (Catalunya), Linsey McGoey (Essex), Liz Moor (Goldsmiths), Fabian Muniesa (Mines Tech, Paris), Dan Neyland (Goldsmiths), David Oswell (Goldsmiths), Marsha Rosengarten (Goldsmiths), Evelyn Ruppert (Goldsmiths), Manuel Tironi (Catholic University of Chile) Organisers: Noortje Marres, Michael Guggenheim & Alex Wilkie (Goldsmiths) All welcome. If you would like to participate, please register by sending an email to csisp@gold.ac.uk

Forced Migration:  Challenges and Change 3rd Annual Conference of the Canadian Association for Refu

May 06 2010 | McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario

Deadline: January 29 2010

Updated: February 14 2010

In recent years, the idea of change has charged political debate in countries around the world and has, in some cases, catalyzed the election of new governments and the creation of innovative programs and policies. This period has also been one of significant change for the field of forced migration. New policies and increasingly securitized perceptions of forced migration have created new practices such as interdiction, detention and expedited deportation that have changed the protection landscape in both the global North and South. At the same time as scholars have questioned the labelling and bureaucratic categorization of forced migrants, the United Nations has piloted new approaches to improve the protection and assistance available to members of traditionally marginalized ?categories?, particularly internally displaced persons. Massive displacement in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and Cyclone Nargis raised the profile of ?environmental refugees? as an issue predicted to grow in importance as the impacts of climate change become increasingly evident. In Canada, the government has recently announced that it is preparing a package of changes to the refugee determination system, including the fast-tracking of claims from countries that are generally considered safe. As a precursor to more sweeping anticipated changes, the government has already imposed visa requirements on Mexico and the Czech Republic in an attempt to stem the flow of refugee claimants from those countries.

The 2010 CARFMS Conference will bring together researchers, policymakers, displaced persons and advocates from diverse disciplinary and regional backgrounds to discuss the changes and challenges faced in the field of forced migration. We invite participants from a wide range of perspectives to explore the practical, experiential, policy-oriented, legal and theoretical questions raised by different processes of change affecting forced migrants at the local, national, regional and international levels. The conference will feature keynote and plenary speeches from leaders in the field, and we welcome proposals for individual papers and organized panels structured around the following broad sub-themes:


Asylum, protection and durable solutions: Needs, current practices and prospects for reform Calls for reform of national and international refugee protection systems have been raised in different quarters, with dramatically diverse visions for change. What are the key challenges facing advocates, policymakers and displaced communities and individuals? How have trends in the interception, interdiction, processing, detention, deportation, protection, settlement and integration of forced migrants shaped prospects for reform? What models might inform the productive reform of the Canadian refugee system? What role might scholars play in efforts to strengthen the protection of forced migrants and the effective resolution of displacement?

Theorizing the changing field of forced migration

Past decades have seen rapid development ? domestically and internationally ? in the study of refugee protection and forced migration both within traditional disciplines and across disciplinary lines. With such significant change in research and policy in recent years, the longer view ? both to the past and to the future ? cannot be neglected. What is the nature of refugee protection in a globalized world, and how is it important (or not) to consider the ?new? era? What have been the historical trajectories of laws, policies and practices in forced migration, and how can the historicization of the field advance understandings of change and contemporary challenges? How have different disciplines, methodologies and approaches affected our understandings? Finally, what role is there for actors outside of academia, from policymakers and refugee advocates to displaced persons themselves?


Experiencing displacement: Changes and challenges How have recent political and social changes, and changes in the structure and operation of the refugee regime affected the lives of displaced persons? What can scholars of forced migration learn about the contemporary reality of the refugee regime by focusing on the lived experience of displaced individuals and communities? In this section, we particularly welcome presentations by displaced individuals, advocates, and organizations working directly with forced migrants.

Pre-conference workshops/networking A number of pre-conference workshops and networking sessions will take place on the afternoon of May 5. More information on pre-conference workshops/session will be available on conference website shortly.


SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS Individuals wishing to present a paper at the conference must submit a 250-word abstract by January 29, 2010. The conference organizers welcome submissions of both individual papers and proposals for panels.

Please submit your abstract via the conference website: http://carfmsconference.yorku.ca/. For more information, please contact Heather Johnson johnsohl@mcmaster.ca

Call for Papers Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America

April 08 2010 | Venice, Italy

Deadline: May 15 2010

sarah@avenueDstereo.com

Updated: January 14 2010

Panel on: Artificial life: Golems, Homunculi, Automata
The definition of life seems to be a particularly 20th- or 21st- century conundrum with our current debates over the ethics of cloning, abortion, and stem-cell research. Although the Judeo-Christian creation story set forth in Genesis established orthodox views on the origins of life and the differences among humans and other animals, the period saw its own upheavals in the understanding of life, from the discovery of bizarre life forms in newly explored regions of the planet to the revelations of the microscope. I invite papers that look at the possibilities for artificial life or artificial intelligence, as they were explored in fields such as alchemy, natural philosophy, mechanics and clockworks, or mathematics. What does the early modern quest for artificial life tell us about religious, metaphysical, scientific, or political definitions of the body and mind? Please send a CV and abstract of no more than 150 words by 15 May to Sarah Benson, Saint John's College, Annapolis: sarah@avenueDstereo.com or sarah.benson@sjca.edu.

cAIR10 Applied Interculturality Research

April 07 2010 | University of Graz, Austria

Deadline: October 15 2009

http://www.uni-graz.at/fAIR/cAIR10/

Updated: January 14 2010

cAIR combines the resources of research (universities, institutes) and practice (government, civil society, NGOs, schools, media) to raise awareness about sexism, racism and xenophobia and reduce its prevalence and impact. cAIR helps practitioners to benefit from researchers, and researchers from practitioners - and promotes high standards in both areas. Keynote addresses will be given by international leaders in interculturality research and practice.

The extended deadline for submission of project summaries is October 15th - further information and the guidelines for the project summaries can be found on our homepage: http://www.uni-graz.at/fAIR/cAIR10/ Please send your project summaries to: cair10@uni-graz.at

International Conference on ICT for Africa 2010

March 25 2010 | Cameroon

http://www.icitd.org

Updated: January 14 2010

It is quite opportune that Africa has something to contribute to the information age. First, with innovations like mobile phones, we can say that Africa has not been left out. Africa is reported to be the world's single fastest-growing regional mobile market. Second, some researchers have noted that there tends to be mismatch between the realities for developing economies and assumptions of Western models of enterprise, thus as business practices evolve with their changing business environments, more research is needed to redefine existing knowledge to be consistent and applicable with the dynamic nature of the environment. These developments draw attention to a number of questions. What role can we play in the information age? Is Africa going to be only consumers of the information age or can Africa join the producers of ICT knowledge, products and services? What could be emergent patterns of ICT knowledge transfer in development? Is there an opportunity for unique contribution from Africa in this information age?
If there is, then let us tell the story of what we have in this conference. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), The National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) and The Louisiana Board of Regents, we are pleased to announce The International Conference on ICT for Africa 2010. The International Conference on ICT for Africa 2010 (ICIA 2010) is themed 'ICT for Development - Contributions of the South'.

This conference will bring together a fine mix of practitioners and academicians in the area of ICTs for sustainable development. The conference will explore the contributions of Africa to the global ICT for development discourse and efforts. The objective is to highlight the synergy of collaboration between African countries and other developing countries, and between African countries and the developed countries towards development solutions. Discussions and panel debates will therefore question how ICTs become the process for South-to-South knowledge transfer and South-to-North knowledge transfer in both research and practice. Workshops will explore international grant-seeking opportunities for ICT research and projects, e-learning for African universities and new frontiers in telemedicine and tele-neonatology research and practice in Africa. Visit the website at http://www.icitd.org..
Contact: ebeleokocha@yahoo.com

ICT and Development:Research Voices from Africa,  International Federation for Information Processin

March 22 2010 | Makerere University, Uganda

Deadline: November 30 2009

african-voices@googlegroups.com

Updated: January 14 2010

“ICT for development” has attracted wide attention for several years now. Often we hear about ICT in Africa, much more rarely about ICT from African voices. Why did our knowledge about the correlations between ICT and the economy and society fail to develop ICT to support development? Is the mainstream model of conceptualising and implementing ICT4D applicable and helpful in the African context? What are the alternatives to dominant approaches? This workshop is intended to provide a forum for discussion of ICT research approaches and findings that emerged from and relevant to the African contexts. We are particularly interested in receiving written submissions from African researchers in ICT for development, and from African intellectuals outside the mainstream ICT-based approach to economic growth and social improvements.
We welcome explanatory papers, aiming at analysis and understanding of ICT in actual African contexts. More precisely, the workshop invites short papers in the following focal areas: discontinuities between the African context and dominant ICT paradigm role of information, and ICT, within Africa and between Africa and the rest of the world barriers against Africa’s adoption, appropriation and autonomous use of ICT•cultural issues that may shape ICT adoption in unexpected ways•alternative strategies of ICT implementation and sustainability in Africa uncertainty, unpredictability, risk and serendipity related to ICT initiatives•role of ICT in empowerment, illiteracy, poverty eradication, and human development in Africa. The workshop is intended to be informal and inclusive in order to provide a “bigger picture” of ICT in Africa.
We welcome participants from academic institutions engaged in similar research, governmental and non-governmental organizations, public and private sector representatives, entrepreneurs and grass-root movements, civil society and ICT practitioners.
SubmissionsWe call for submission of short papers, in the form of long abstracts, up to 2000 words. Please send them as email attachments to this address:african-voices@googlegroups.com

Fourth International Conference on Design Principles and Practices

February 13 2010 | University of Illinois, Chicago

Deadline: June 11 2009

http://www.Design-Conference.com

Updated: January 14 2010

We are excited to be holding this year's Conference in Chicago, one of the world's great design cities. Chicago serves as a living history of modern architecture - the home of the world's first skyscrapers and, at various times, of architects Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. More recently and notably in the global design scene, Chicago-based Sol Sender created the the design strategy and concept for the 2008 Obama campaign for the US Presidency. Chicago is also a marvelous city of art and design galleries, and museums, including a recently opened modern art wing to the Chicago Art Institute, designed by Renzo Piano. This dynamic history, and continuing spirit of creativity, makes Chicago an environment well suited to the goals and spirit of the International Conference on Design Principles and Practices.

The Design Conference is a place to explore the meaning and purpose of 'design', as well as speaking in grounded ways about the task of design and the use of designed artifacts and processes. The Conference is a cross-disciplinary forum that brings together researchers, teachers and practitioners to discuss the nature and future of design. In professional and disciplinary terms, the Conference traverses a broad sweep to construct a dialogue which encompasses the perspectives and practices of: anthropology, architecture, art, artificial intelligence, business, cognitive science, communication studies, computer science, cultural studies, design studies, education, e-learning, engineering, ergonomics, fashion, graphic design, history, information systems, industrial design, industrial engineering, instructional design, interior design, interaction design, interface design, journalism, landscape architecture, law, linguistics and semiotics, management, media and entertainment, psychology, sociology, software engineering and telecommunications.

This highly inclusive format provides Conference Delegates with significant opportunities to connect with people from shared fields and disciplines and with those from vastly different specialisations. The resulting conversations provide ample occasions for mutual learning, often weaving between the theoretical and the empirical, research and application, and market pragmatics and social idealism.

As well as an international line-up of plenary speakers, the Conference will also include numerous paper, workshop and colloquium presentations by practitioners, teachers and researchers. Presenters may choose to submit written papers for publication in the refereed Design Principles and Practices: an International Journal of Design Principles and Practices. If you are unable to attend the Conference in person, virtual registrations are also available which allow you to submit a paper for refereeing and possible publication, as well as access to the Journal.

Whether you are a virtual or in-person presenter at the Design Conference, we also encourage you to present on the Conference YouTube Channel. Please select the Online Sessions link on the Conference website for further details.

The deadline for the next round in the call for papers (a title and short abstract) is 11 June 2009. Future deadlines will be announced on the Conference website after this date. Proposals are reviewed within two weeks of submission. Full details of the Conference, including an online proposal submission form, may be found at the Conference website -
http://www.Design-Conference.com.

2010 College Art Association Conference

February 10 2010 | Chicago

Deadline: May 08 2009

(http://conference.collegeart.org/2010/

Updated: January 14 2010

Please see teh website for more information: (http://conference.collegeart.org/2010/) for more information about the conference and for details about how to submit a proposal. Proposals should be emailed directly to Aviva Dove Viebahn (adovevie@mail.rochester.edu) no later than May 8, 2009, with all CAA-required accompanying materials included.
http://www.iitd.ac.in/events/ICTD2010/

iConference Workshop on Sociotechnical systems, “Keywords of the Sociotechnical”

February 03 2010 | University of Illinois, Urbana Champagne

http://www.sociotech.net

Updated: January 14 2010

This workshop will provide a venue to gather and discuss our intellectual traditions, research objects, and vocabularies in order to elaborate and clarify the keywords of the sociotechnical.

The workshop builds on and extends efforts that have included the 2008 & 2009 Summer Research Institute of the Consortium for the Science of Sociotechnical Systems (CSST). These Research Institutes, supported by the National Science Foundation and held at the University of Michigan (2008) and Syracuse University (2009), brought together a diverse set of researchers from fields as diverse as science and technology studies, human-computer interaction, management and organizational studies, library and information science, sociology, social informatics, and computer science, to begin exploring and framing a future research agenda centered on socio-technical research.
http://www.sociotech.net . You may register
here: https://www.ischools.org/conftool/