ANTH 170/FOLK 171 - Medicine & Anthropology
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Course Objectives:

INVITATION TO THE COURSE

From birth to death, medical decisions pervade our lives. From macroeconomic controversies over private vs. managed care to microsociological decisions over whether to consult established or alternative medical practitioners—or whether to self-medicate—all of us make decisions, on a daily basis, over choices of medical treatment. Utopian images of a 'magic bullet' for curing all diseases, based on vaccines for smallpox and polio, have given way to the chronic reality of endemic global diseases, such as AIDS. Recent cases of bioterrorism have served to highlight the close links that may continue to exist between rural diseases of our preindustrial past, such as anthrax and West Nile Virus, and modern urban environments.

This course takes a historical and comparative approach to global medicine. The course especially emphasizes three topics: (a) controversies precipitated by new medical technologies; (b) continuities and dislocations between western and Asian medical traditions; (c) appropriate responses to chronic and global diseases, such as AIDS. We shall continually return, throughout this course, to consider the broad plurality of types of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of new hospital and medical technologies.

Students will gain most from this course if they take regular notes on the required (and selected supplementary) readings, as we progress through the syllabus.

The course will be conducted as lecture-discussion, with brief semi-collaborative oral student reports, and longer written essay assignments.. The required readings should be completed before class; the supplementary readings introduce comparative and supplementary perspectives. Supplementary readings may also serve as material for student reports, and as additional background for essay assignments.

No prior course background in anthropology is presumed in this course. I do expect, however, that each individual will bring his or her own experiences to the course as a consumer, and perhaps even as a practitioner, of various types of medicine. Opportunites will be provided to draw from these experiences throughout the course, in both oral and written assignments. Students should achieve greater awareness of the broad diversity of types of medicine throughout the world in this course.

STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING & LEARNING

After a brief introductory overview, the course is organized into three sections. The first section provides a general overview of modern medicine worldwide, with special emphasis on new hospital and medical technologies. Section two focuses on a broad scale comparison between western (Greek) and Asian (Chinese) traditions of medicine. Section three focuses upon AIDS as an exemplar of the type of global disease that is becoming increasingly common in contemporary societies worldwide. The course will be historical and comparative in approach, constantly relating specific local types of medicine to broader social and cultural domains.

This course is constructed to foster progressive styles of learning. General classroom discussions will lead to small group collaborative student led discussions of the readings, which will in turn provide ideas and material for the individual essay writing assignments. In preparing their essays, students may either concentrate on the extensive list of supplementary, as well as required, readings already designated in the syllabus, or on additional material gleaned from their own research. Students are also encouraged to introduce an element of original ethnographic observations (interviews, participant-observation, etc.) into their writing assignments.

This course is lecture-discussion. There will also be several videos shown throughout the course.

COURSE DETAILS

Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 10:00 am. to 10:50 am., Alumni Bldg., Room 205

Class page: http://www.unc.edu/courses/2002fall/anth/170/001/

Instructor:

Gary Hausman, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Anthropology Department, UNC.

Office: Alumni Bldg., Room #409C

Mailing Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Anthropology, 301 Alumni Building, CB# 3115, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3115

Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm; and by appointment.

Phone: 919-962-3280

E-mail: hausman@email.unc.edu

URL: http://www.unc.edu/depts/anthro/faculty/fac_pages/hausmanG.html

Texts/Resources:

Course Materials

There are four required books available for purchase at the university bookstore.

Shirley Lindenbaum and Margaret Lock (eds.), Knowledge, Power, and Practice: The Anthropology of Medicine and Everyday Life, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993

Margaret Lock, Allan Young, & Alberto Cambrosio (eds.), Living and Working with the New Medical Technologies: Intersections of Inquiry, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001

Shigehisa Kuriyama, The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine, New York: Zone Books, 2002

Paul Farmer, AIDS and Accusation: Haiti and the Geography of Blame, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992

Additionally, a Course Pack is available for purchase at the university bookstore.

Resources

There are various types of reserve readings for this course.

Readings not otherwise available electronically have been placed on reserve at both Alumni Bldg. (third floor file cabinet) and at the Undergraduate Library Reserves. Many readings are available electronically, either through Electronic Journals Online, through JSTOR Online, or through netLibrary Online. Most undergraduate reserve readings are also accessible electronically through Course Reserves. Alumni Bldg. reserve readings should be signed in and signed out, on the sign out sheet.

For additional assistance with essay assignments, students are quite welcome to make use of the facilities of The Writing Center.

Student Responsibilities

All students are expected to abide by the Honor Code of the University (see Undergraduate Bulletin, 2002-2003, p. 323).

Late papers will not be accepted. Students may, at the discretion of the instructor, exercise the option of rewriting any of the three essay assignments for a higher grade.

Course Calendar:
2002-08-21 WEEK ONE I INTRODUCTION
Activity during this class Introduction
Introduction to the course. No readings.

2002-08-23
Preparation for this class Medicine & Anthropology: Contemporary Approaches
REQUIRED READINGS
Hans A. Baer, Merrill Singer, and Ida Susser, 'Chapter 1 - Medical Anthropology: Central Concepts and Development,' pp. 3-19 in Medical Anthropology and the World System: A Critical Perspective, Westport: Bergin & Garvey, 1997

Margaret Lock, Allan Young, & Alberto Cambrosio, 'Introduction,' pp. 1-16 in Living and Working with the New Medical Technologies: Intersections of Inquiry, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Allan M. Brandt and Martha Gardner, 'The Golden Age of Medicine?,' pp. 21-37 in Roger Cooter and John Pickstone (eds.), Medicine in the Twentieth Century, Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers, 2000

Shirley Lindenbaum & Margaret Lock, 'Preface,' pp. ix-xv in Knowledge, Power & Practice: The Anthropology of Medicine and Everyday Life, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993

2002-08-26 WEEK TWO II MEDICINE & TECHNOLOGY
Activity during this class Video: Temple of Science
Medicine at the Crossroads Series, PBS, 1993, Tape 1: Temple of Science (57 minutes) [HSL Educational Videos W 21 VC1 1993 tape 1]

2002-08-28
Preparation for this class Medical Training
REQUIRED READINGS
Byron J. Good & Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, '"Learning Medicine:" The Constructing of Medical Knowledge at Harvard Medical School,' pp. 81-107 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Keir Waddington, 'Mayhem and Medical Students: Image, Conduct, and Control in the Victorian and Edwardian London Teaching Hospital,' Social History of Medicine, 15(1): 45-64, April 2002 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-08-30
Preparation for this class Medical Diagnostics - Epidemiology
REQUIRED READINGS
Patricia A. Kaufert & John O'Neil, 'Analysis of a Dialogue on Risks in Childbirth: Clinicians, Epidemiologists, and Inuit Women,' pp. 32-54 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

Patricia A. Kaufert, 'Screening the Body: The Pap Smear and the Mammogram,' pp. 165-183 in Living and Working

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Ronald Frankenberg, 'Risk: Anthropological and Epidemiological Narratives of Prevention,' pp. 219-242 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

2002-09-02 WEEK THREE
Note Labor Day Holiday
NO CLASS.

2002-09-04
Preparation for this class Medical Diagnostics - Amniocentesis
REQUIRED READINGS
Rayna Rapp, 'Accounting for Amniocentesis,' pp. 55-76 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

Rayna Rapp, 'Extra Chromosomes and Blue Tulips: Medico-Familial Interpretations,' pp. 184-208 in Living and Working

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Lisa M. Mitchell & Eugenia Georges, 'Cross-Cultural Cyborgs: Greek and Canadian Women's Discourses on Fetal Ultrasound,' Feminist Studies 23(2): pp. 373-401, Summer 1997

2002-09-06
Preparation for this class Medical Diagnostics - Cancers
REQUIRED READINGS
Peter Keating & Alberto Cambrosio, '"Real Compared to What:" Diagnosing Leukemias and Lymphomas,' pp. 103-134 in Living and Working

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Gilbert Lewis, 'Double Standards of Treatment Evaluation,' pp. 189-218 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

Peter Keating & Alberto Cambrosio, 'Biomedical Platforms,' Configurations 8(3): 337-387, 2000 [Electronic Journals Online]
Activity during this class 1st Essay Guidelines
Guidelines for the First Essay Assignment will be posted today.

2002-09-09 WEEK FOUR
Preparation for this class Medical Diagnostics - Atheroscleroses
REQUIRED READINGS
Annemarie Mol, 'Pathology and the Clinic: An Ethnographic Presentation of Two Artheroscleroses,' pp. 82-102 in Living and Working

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Roberto Brinceño-Léon, 'Social Aspects of Chagas Disease,' pp. 287-300 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

2002-09-11
Preparation for this class Socio-Medical Disorders
REQUIRED READINGS
Joseph Dumit, 'When Explanations Rest: "Good-Enough" Brain Science and the New Socio-Medical Disorders,' pp. 209-232 in Living and Working

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Horacio Fabrega, 'Biomedical Psychiatry as an Object for a Critical Medical Anthropology,' pp. 166-188 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

2002-09-13
Preparation for this class Medicalization & Nervoso
REQUIRED READINGS
Nancy Scheper-Hughes, 'Nervoso: Medicine, Sickness, and Human Needs,' pp. 167-215 in Death Without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil, University of California Press, 1992

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

C. H. Browner, 'On the Medicalization of Medical Anthropology,' Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 13(2): 135-140, June 1997
Activity during this class VIDEO: Gift of a Girl
Gift of a Girl, Mayyasa Al-Malazi, 1997 [UL NonPrint 65-V7984]

2002-09-16 WEEK FIVE
Preparation for this class Medical Psychiatry & Clinical Settings
REQUIRED READINGS
Sue E. Estroff, 'Identity, Disability, and Schizophrenia: The Problem of Chronicity,' pp. 247-286 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Lorna Amarasingham Rhodes, 'The Shape of Action: Practice in Public Psychiatry,' pp. 129-144 in Knowledge, Power & Practice
Activity during this class VIDEO: Spirit Possession of Alejandro Mamani
The Spirit Possession of Alejandro Mamani, 1974, 28 minutes [UL-NonPrint 65-V5280]

2002-09-18
Preparation for this class Ideology & Psychiatric Styles of Reasoning
REQUIRED READINGS
Allan Young, 'A Description of How Ideology Shapes Knowledge of a Mental Disorder (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder),' pp. 108-128 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Allan Young, 'History, Hystery and Psychiatric Styles of Reasoning,' pp. 135-162 in Living and Working

Megan Barke, Rebecca Fribush & Peter N. Stearns, 'Nervous Breakdown in 20th-Century American Culture,' Journal of Social History 33(3): 565-584, 2000 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-09-20
Preparation for this class Immunology & Molecular Biology
REQUIRED READINGS
Donna Haraway, 'The Biopolitics of Postmodern Bodies: Determinations of Self in Immune System Discourse,' pp. 364-410 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

Gisli Palsson & Paul Rabinow, 'Iceland: The Case of a National Human Genome Project,' Anthropology Today 15(5): 14-18, 1999

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, 'Beyond Nature and Culture: Modes of Reasoning in the Age of Molecular Biology and Medicine, pp. 19-30 in Living and Working

Paul Rabinow, 'Epochs, Presents, Events,' pp. 31-43 in Living and Working
Due for this class 1st Essay Assignment
The First Essay Assignment is due today in class.

2002-09-23 WEEK SIX
Preparation for this class Gender Ideologies & Medicine
REQUIRED READINGS
Margaret Lock, 'The Politics of Mid-Life and Menopause: Ideologies for the Second Sex in North America and Japan,' pp. 330-363 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Emily Martin, 'The Egg and the Sperm: How Science Has Constructed a Romance Based on Stereotypical Male-Female Roles,' Signs 16(3): 483-501, 1991

2002-09-25
Preparation for this class Medical Diagnostics: Determining Death
REQUIRED READINGS
Margaret Lock, 'On Dying Twice: Culture, Technology and the Determination of Death,' pp. 233-262 in Living and Working

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Lawrence Cohen, 'Where It Hurts: Indian Material for an Ethics of Organ Transplantation,' Daedalus 128(4): 135-165, Fall 1999

L. A. Sharp, 'Organ Transplantation as a Transformative Experience,' Medical Anthropology Quarterly 9(3): 357-389, 1995

2002-09-27
Preparation for this class Medical Technologies: Organ Transplants
REQUIRED READINGS
Veena Das, 'The Practice of Organ Transplants: Networks, Documents, Translations,' pp. 263-287 in Living and Working

Nancy Scheper-Hughes, 'Theft of Life: The Globalization of Organ Stealing Rumours,' Anthropology Today 12(3): 3-11, June 1996 [JSTOR Archive Online]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Nancy Scheper-Hughes, 'The Global Traffic in Human Organs, Current Anthropology 41(2): 191-211, 2000 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-09-30 WEEK SEVEN
Preparation for this class Medicine & Imperialism in Africa
REQUIRED READINGS
Jean Comaroff, 'The Diseased Heart of Africa: Medicine, Colonialism, and the Black Body,' pp. 305-329 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Jean Comaroff & John L. Comaroff, 'Millennial Capitalism: First Thoughts on a Second Coming,' Public Culture 12(2): 291-343, 2000 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-10-02
Preparation for this class Medical Dispensaries & the State in Niger
REQUIRED READINGS
Adeline Masquelier, 'Behind the Dispensary's Prosperous Façade: Imagining the State in Rural Niger,' Public Culture 13(2): 267-291, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Tola Olu Pearce, 'Lay Medical Knowledge in an African Context,' pp. 150-165 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

2002-10-04
Preparation for this class Medicine & Race: Tuskagee Syphilis Study
REQUIRED READINGS
James Jones, 'The Tuskagee Syphilis Experiment: A Moral Astigmatism,' pp. 275-286 in Sandra Harding (ed.), The "Racial" Economy of Science: Toward a Democratic Future, Bloomington: Indiana University Press [netLibrary Online]

Vanessa N. Gamble, 'Under the Shadow of Tuskegee: African Americans and Health Care,' American Journal of Public Health 87(11): 1773-1778, 1997

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz, 'Non-Random Events,' review of Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, by James H. Jones, The Yale Review: 284-296, 1983

Stephen B. Thomas & Sandra Crouse Quinn, 'Public Health Then and Now: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, 1932 to 1972: Implications for HIV Education and AIDS Risk Education Programs in the Black Community,' American Journal of Public Health 81(11): 1498-1505, November 1991

2002-10-07 WEEK EIGHT
Preparation for this class Medical Attendants: Midwives in India
REQUIRED READINGS
Roger Jeffery & Patricia M. Jeffery, 'Traditional Birth Attendants in Rural North India: The Social Organization of Childbearing,' pp. 7-31 in Knowledge, Power & Practice

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
J. Burr, 'Cultural Stereotypes of Women from South Asian Communities: Mental Health Care Professionals' Explanations for Patterns of Suicide and Depression,' Social Science & Medicine 55(5): 835-845, September 2002 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-10-09
Activity during this class VIDEO: Eduardo the Healer
Eduardo the Healer, 1978, 55 minutes [HSL Educational Media WB 50 DP6 VC1 1978]

2002-10-11 III EXPRESSIVENESS OF THE BODY
Preparation for this class Expressiveness of the Body: Pulse & Rhythm
REQUIRED READINGS
Shigehisa Kuriyama, The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine, New York: Zone Books, 1999, pp. 7-60

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Elisabeth Hsu, 'Towards a Science of Touch, Part I: Chinese Pulse Diagnostics in Early Modern Europe,' Anthropology & Medicine 7(2): 251-268, 2000 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-10-14 WEEK NINE
Preparation for this class Expressiveness of the Body: Pulse & Rhythm
REQUIRED READINGS
Kuriyama, Expressiveness, pp. 61-108

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Elisabeth Hsu, 'Towards a Science of Touch, Part II: Representations of Tactile Experience of the Seven Chinese Pulses Indicating Danger of Death in Early Modern Europe,' Anthropology & Medicine 7(3): 319-333, 2000 [Electronic Journals Online]
Activity during this class 2nd Essay Guidelines
Guidelines for the Second Essay Assignment will be posted today.

2002-10-16
Preparation for this class Medical Syncretism: Ayurveda
REQUIRED READINGS
Charles Leslie, 'Interpretations of Illness: Syncretism in Modern Ayurveda,' pp. 177-208 in Charles Leslie & Allan Young, Paths to Asian Medical Knowledge, Berkeley: University of Callifornia Press, 1992

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Gary J. Hausman, 'Making Medicine Indigenous: Homeopathy in South India,' Social History of Medicine 15(2): 303-322, 2002 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-10-18
Note FALL BREAK
NO CLASS.

2002-10-21 WEEK TEN
Preparation for this class Expressiveness: Muscularity & Identity
REQUIRED READINGS
Kuriyama, Expressiveness, pp. 109-151

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Vivienne Lo, 'Spirit of Stone: Technical Considerations in the Treatment of the Jade Body,' Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 55(1): 99-128, 2002 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-10-23
Preparation for this class Expressiveness: Colors
REQUIRED READINGS
Kuriyama, Expressiveness, pp. 153-192

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Andrew Cunningham, 'Chapter Four—Vesalius: The Revival of Galenic Anatomy,' pp. 88-142 in The Anatomical Renaissance: The Resurrection of the Anatomical Projects of the Ancients, Scolar Press, 1997

2002-10-25
Preparation for this class Expressiveness: Blood
REQUIRED READINGS
Kuriyama, Expressiveness, pp. 193-231

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Roberta Bivins, 'The Needle Transfixed: Ten Rhyne, Kaempfer and the European Gaze,' pp. 46-94 in Acupuncture, Expertise and Cross-Cultural Medicine, Palgrave, 2000

2002-10-28 WEEK ELEVEN
Preparation for this class Expressiveness: Wind & Self
REQUIRED READINGS
Kuriyama, Expressiveness, pp. 233-272

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

José van Dijck, 'Bodyworlds: The Art of Plastinated Cadavers,' Configurations 9(1): 99-126, Winter 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]
Due for this class 2nd Essay Assignment
The second essay assignment is due today in class.

2002-10-30 IV AIDS AS A GLOBAL DISEASE
Preparation for this class HIV & AIDS: Thinking About Epidemics
REQUIRED READINGS
Janis Faye Hutchinson, 'The Biology and Evolution of HIV,' Annual Review of Anthropology 30: 85-108, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

Charles E. Rosenberg, 'What is an Epidemic? AIDS in Historical Perspective,' Daedalus 118(2): 1-17, 1989

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Shirley Lindenbaum, 'Kuru, Prions, and Human Affairs: Thinking About Epidemics,' Annual Review of Anthropology 30: 363-385, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

Stephanie Kane & Theresa Mason, 'AIDS and Criminal Justice,' Annual Review of Anthropology 30: 457-479, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-11-01
Preparation for this class AIDS & Anthropology
REQUIRED READINGS
Paul Farmer, AIDS and Accusation: Haiti and the Geography of Blame, University of California Press, 1992, pp. 1-16

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Allan M. Brandt, '"Plagues and Peoples:" The AIDS Epidemic,' pp. 183-204 in No Magic Bullet: A Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States since 1880, Expanded Edition, New York: Oxford University Press, 1987

2002-11-04 WEEK TWELVE
Preparation for this class Advent of AIDS in Do Kay Village
REQUIRED READINGS
Farmer, AIDS and Accusation, pp. 17-58

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Paul Farmer, 'Rethinking "Emerging Infectious Diseases,"' pp. 37-58 in Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plagues, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999 [netLibrary Online]

2002-11-06
Preparation for this class Progression of AIDS in Do Kay Village
REQUIRED READINGS
Farmer, AIDS and Accusation, pp. 59-120

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Sander L. Gilman, 'AIDS and Syphilis: The Iconography of Disease,' pp. 87-107 in Douglas Crimp (ed.), AIDS: Cultural Analysis, Cultural Activism, Cambridge: MIT Press, 1988

2002-11-08
Activity during this class VIDEO: From Yellow Fever to AIDS
The Fight Against Infectious Disease: From Yellow Fever to AIDS, Blackwell Corporation, 1987, 60 minutes [UL NonPrint 65-V3029]

2002-11-11 WEEK THIRTEEN
Preparation for this class AIDS in Africa
REQUIRED READINGS
Brad Weiss, 'Plastic Teeth Extraction: The Iconography of Haya Gastro-Sexual Affliction,' American Ethnologist 19(3): 538-552, 1992

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Brooke G. Schoepf, 'International AIDS Research in Anthropology: Taking a Critical Perspective on the Crisis,' Annual Review of Anthropology 30: 335-361, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-11-13
Preparation for this class HIV: History & Epidemiology in Haiti
REQUIRED READINGS
Farmer, AIDS and Accusation, pp. 121-150

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Hans A. Baer, Merrill Singer, & Ida Susser, 'Chapter 8—AIDS: A Disease of the Global System,' pp. 159-188 in Medical Anthropology and the World System: A Critical Perspective, Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey, 1997
Activity during this class 3rd Essay Guidelines
Guidelines for the Third Essay Assignment will be posted today.

2002-11-15
Preparation for this class Reproduction & HIV
REQUIRED READINGS
Emily Martin, 'From Reproduction to HIV: Blurring Categories, Shifting Positions,' pp. 256-269 in Faye D. Ginsburg & Rayna Rapp (eds.), Conceiving the New World Order: The Global Politics of Reproduction, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Richard Parker, 'Sexuality, Culture, and Power in HIV/AIDS Research,' Annual Review of Anthropology 30: 163-179, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-11-18 WEEK FOURTEEN
Preparation for this class Geographies of Blame
REQUIRED READINGS
Farmer, AIDS and Accusation, pp. 151-190

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Sander L. Gilman, 'The Beautiful Body and AIDS: The Image of the Body at Risk at the Close of the Twentieth Century,' pp. 115-172 in Picturing Health and Illness: Images of Identity and Difference, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995

2002-11-20
Preparation for this class Drugs, Clinical Trials, & AIDS
REQUIRED READINGS
Ilana Löwy, 'Trustworthy Knowledge and Desperate Patients: Clinical Tests for New Drugs from Cancer to AIDS,' pp. 49-81 in Living and Working

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Elizabeth Miller, 'What's in a Condom?—HIV and Sexual Politics in Japan,' Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 26(1): 1-32, February 2002 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-11-22
Activity during this class VIDEO: Disordered States
Medicine at the Crossroads Series, PBS, 1993, Tape 8, Disordered States, 56 minutes [HSL Educational Videos W 21 VC1 1993 tape 8]

2002-11-25 WEEK FIFTEEN
Preparation for this class Asian Pharmaceuticals & Commodification
REQUIRED READINGS
Richard Burghart, 'Penicillin: An Ancient Ayurvedic Medicine,' pp. 289-298 in Sjaak van der Geest & Susan Reynolds Whyte (eds.), The Context of Medicines in Developing Countries: Studies in Pharmaceutical Anthropology, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Mark Nichter, 'Pharmaceuticals, the Commodification of Health, and the Health Care-Medicine Use Transition,' pp. 265-326 in Mark Nichter & Mimi Nichter, Anthropology and International Health: Asian Case Studies, 2nd edition, Gordon and Breach Publishers, 1996

2002-11-27
Preparation for this class AIDS & Accusation
REQUIRED READINGS
Farmer, AIDS and Accusation, pp. 191-264

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Heather Schell, 'Outburst! A Chilling True Story about Emerging-Virus Narratives and Pandemic Social Change,' Configurations 5(1): 93-133, 1997 [Electronic Journals Online]
Due for this class 3rd Essay Assignment
Essay Assignment Three is due in class today.

2002-11-29
Note Thanksgiving Recess
NO CLASS.

2002-12-02 WEEK SIXTEEN
Preparation for this class AIDS in India (1)
REQUIRED READINGS
Marika Vicziany, 'HIV and AIDS in India: Love, Disease and Technology Transfer to the Kamasutra Condom,' Contemporary South Asia 10(1): 95-129, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Sheena Asthma and Robert Oostvogels, 'The Social Construction of Male "Homesexuality" in India: Implications for HIV Transmission and Prevention,' Social Science and Medicine 52(5): 407-421, March 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-12-04
Preparation for this class AIDS in India (2)
REQUIRED READINGS
Marika Vicziany, 'HIV/AIDS in Maharashtra: Blood, Money, Blood Banks and Technology Transfer, Contemporary South Asia 10(3): 381-414, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Angela D. Bryan, Jeffrey D. Fisher, & T. Joseph Benziger, 'Determinants of HIV Risk Among Indian Truck Drivers,' Social Science & Medicine 53(11): 1413-1426, December 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-12-13 WEEK SEVENTEEN
Due for this class Final Examination
The Final Examination for ANTH 170 will take place on Friday, December 13, at 8:00 am.

 

Course Assignments:

Class participation: 15%
1st essay: 20%
2nd essay: 25%
3rd essay: 25%
Final examination: 15%

  • Class Participation
    In addition to general participation in class discussion on a daily basis, each student is responsible for serving as one of several discussion leaders for any three non-consecutive weeks of the course. A 'week,' for this purpose, will be defined as three classes extending from Monday to Friday. Discussion leaders for a particular week should sign up in class by Friday of the preceding week. Discussion leaders are encouraged to confer with one another, either in person or through e-mail, about the respective week's readings. They should present a brief five to (at most) ten minutes summary of the required (and, perhaps some of the supplementary) readings at the start of each class. Each discussion leader should submit to me an individual summary (one to two pages at most) of the themes covered in the readings for that week, and their relation to the broader context of the course. Use these brief writing assignments as opportunities to experiment with possible topics for the short essay assignments. Be as specific as possible in setting forth themes that can be developed into paper topics. These brief summaries will not be graded, but will be evaluated with respect to the feasibility of developing them into one of the three esssay assignments for the course. Class participation will comprise 15% of the grade for the course.
  • 1st Short Essay Assignment
    Guidelines for the first short essay will be posted on September 6; the essay will be due in class two weeks later, on September 20. The essay is to be 4-5 pages in length, and will comprise 20% of the grade for the course.
  • 2nd Short Essay Assignment
    Guidelines for the second short essay will be posted on October 14; the essay will be due in class two weeks later, on October 28. The essay is to be 5-6 pages in length, and will comprise 25% of the grade for the course.
  • 3rd Short Essay Assignment
    Guidelines for the third short essay will be posted on November 13; the essay will be due in class two weeks later, on November 27. The essay is to be 5-6 pages in length, and will comprise 25% of the grade for the course.
  • Final Examination
    The final examination will be open book and open notes, and will take place at 8:00 am on December 13. It will comprise 15% of the grade for the course.

This page last updated November 28, 2002

Copyright ©2002 by Gary J. Hausman