Anthropology of the Body and the Subject
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Course Objectives:

INVITATION TO THE COURSE

Theoretical and empirical studies of the body have become increasingly popular over the course of the past two decades. Ranging from phenomenological studies of embodiment to neurological examinations of the brain; from the social history of medicine to cyber punk fiction; from Japanese anime to computer simulations of artificial life; from artistic representations of disabled states to the anthropology of violence and suffering; from feminist studies of gender to correlations between individual and national bodies—both academic and popular realms of discourse have evinced growing interest in questions concerning embodiment. There is even a new journal, Body & Society, devoted entirely to critical writings on the body. This course will survey a mix of classical and contemporary approaches to body studies, from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

The course is interdisciplinary. Readings are drawn from anthropology, cultural studies, literary criticism, philosophy, gender studies, social history, sociology, psychology, medicine, science/technology studies, and science fiction.

Students will gain most from the course if they take regular notes on the required (and selected supplementary) readings, as we progress through the syllabus.

The course will be conducted as lecture-discussion, probably taking on more of an atmosphere of a seminar as the semester progresses. There will be brief semi-collaborative oral/written student reports, longer written essay assignments, a final term paper, and an in-class final examination. The required readings should be completed before class; the supplementary readings will serve to introduce comparative and supplementary perspectives. Supplementary readings may also serve as material for student reports, and as additional background for essay assignments.

While no specific prior background is presumed in anthropology for this course, I do expect that all of us will bring a variety of personal and academic perspectives to this course. Through individual and group discussion, opportunities will be provided to learn from one another, so as to foster interdisciplinary exchange of ideas. Complete all required readings before class; read selected supplementary readings as interested.

STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

The course commences with some classic writings and theories on embodiment, including Merleau-Ponty on the phenomenology of perception, Mauss and Bordieu on habitus and bodily techniques, Bakhtin on the grotesque, Elias on the civilizing process, and Foucault on bodily discipline. These classic theories are related to more contemporary interventions, such as the feminist phenomenological approaches of Young and Grosz. We then proceed, starting with Turner's classic essay on "the social skin," to consider various types of bodily modification and cosmetic surgery; racial, ethnic, and gendered bodily subjectivities; and issues of technology and the body. We shall also consider such imagined forms as Barbie dolls and Wonder Woman, the recent field of disability studies, and various states of dead (and living dead) bodies. The course continues with constructs of cyborg subjectivity, cybernetic expressions of artificial life, and bodily morphing in Japanese anime. The final section of the course will examine parallels and disjunctures between individual and national bodies in the specific case of South Asia. For a case study especially rich in primary material on bodily processes, we shall conclude with a joint reading of Urvashi Butalia's recent book on the individual and social repercussions of India's partition.

This course is constructed to foster progressive styles of learning. General classroom discussions will lead to small group collaborative student led discussions of the readings, which will in turn provide ideas and material for the individual essay writing assignments. In preparing their essays, students may either concentrate on the extensive list of supplementary, as well as required, readings already designated in the syllabus, or on additional material gleaned from their own research. The final term paper should focus on primary materials of original research, with respect to theories of embodiment. Students are encouraged to introduce original ethnographic observations (interviews; participant-observation; images of embodiment drawn from movies, television shows, or web sites, etc.) into their research and writing for this course. There is an excellent collection of non-print audio-visual materials at the Undergraduate Library that may prove useful in research, for anyone interested in additional visual examples of embodiment.

The course is lecture-discussion. There will be several videos shown throughout the course.

COURSE DETAILS

Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2:00 pm. to 2:50 pm., Alumni Bldg., Room 207

Class page: http://www.unc.edu/courses/2002fall/anth/173/001/

 

Instructor:

Gary Hausman, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Anthropology Department, UNC.

Office: Alumni Bldg., Room #409C

Mailing Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Anthropology, 301 Alumni Building, CB# 3115, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3115

Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday, 11:00 am. - 12:30 pm; and by appointment.

Phone: 919-962-3280

E-mail: hausman@email.unc.edu

URL: http://www.unc.edu/depts/anthro/faculty/fac_pages/hausmanG.html

Texts/Resources:

Course Materials

Most of the required readings are in the form of a multi-part Course Pack, available for purchase at the university bookstore.

Additionally, there are two required books available for purchase at the university bookstore.

Urvashi Butalia, The Other Side of Silence: Voices from the Partition of India, Durham: Duke University Press, 2000

William Gibson, Neuromancer, Ace Books, 1984

Resources

There are various types of reserve readings for this course.

Readings not otherwise available electronically have been placed on reserve at both Alumni Bldg. (third floor file cabinet) and at the Undergraduate Library Reserves. Many readings are available electronically, either through Electronic Journals Online, through JSTOR Online, or through netLibrary Online. Most undergraduate reserve readings are also accessible electronically through Course Reserves. Alumni Bldg. reserve readings should be signed in and signed out, on the sign out sheet.

For additional assistance with essay assignments, students are quite welcome to make use of the facilities of The Writing Center.

Student Responsibilities

All students are expected to abide by the Honor Code of the University (see Undergraduate Bulletin, 2002-2003, p. 323).

Late papers will not be accepted. Students may, at the discretion of the instructor, exercise the option of rewriting any of the three essay assignments for a higher grade.

Course Calendar:
2002-08-21 WEEK ONE
Preparation for this class Introductory Bibliographic Surveys
Read ANY TWO of the following eight bibliographic surveys by September 4. Write a one page response outlining one or two topics that might be of interest for your final term paper. You will not be bound to these topics. This is just a means of getting everyone thinking about the final term paper early in the course, so as to allow me to provide each of you with an early response to your ideas.

Carolina Bynum, 'Why All the Fuss About the Body: A Medievalist's Perspective,' Critical Inquiry 22(1): 1-33, Autumn 1995

B. Farnell, 'Moving Bodies, Acting Selves,' Annual Review of Anthropology 28: 341-373, 1999 [Electronic Journals Online]

Alexandra Howson and David Inglis, 'The Body in Sociology: Tensions Inside and Outside Sociological Thought,' The Sociological Review 49(3): 297-317, August 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

Margaret Lock, 'Cultivating the Body: Anthropology and Epistemologies of Bodily Practice and Knowledge,' Annual Review of Anthropology 22: 133-155, 1993 [JSTOR Online]

Emily Martin, 'The End of the Body?,' American Ethnologist 19(1): 121-140, 1992

Roy Porter, 'History of the Body Reconsidered,' pp. 233-260 in Peter Burke (ed.), New Perspectives on Historical Writing, Second Edition, University Park: Penn State University Press, 2001

Leslie A. Sharp, 'The Commodification of the Body and its Parts,' Annual Review of Anthropology 29: 287-328, 2000 [Electronic Journals Online]

Bryan S. Turner, 'Introduction to the Second Edition: The Embodiment of Social Theory,' pp. 1-36 in The Body and Society: Explorations in Social Theory, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1996

2002-08-23
Preparation for this class Phenomenological Approaches to the Body
REQUIRED READINGS
Maurice Merleau-Ponty, pp. 67-89 and 136-147 in The Phenomenology of Perception (translated by Colin Smith), London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1962

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Oliver Sacks, 'The Disembodied Lady,' pp. 43-54 in The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, HarperPerennial, 1985

Katherine Young, 'Disembodiment: Internal Medicine,' pp. 7-45 in Presence in the Flesh: The Body in Medicine, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1997

2002-08-26 WEEK TWO
Preparation for this class (Feminist) Phenomenological Approaches to the Body
REQUIRED READINGS
Iris Marion Young, 'Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Body Comportment, Motility, and Spatiality,' pp. 141-159 in Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essays in Feminist Philosophy and Social Theory, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990

Iris Young, '"Throwing Like a Girl:" Twenty Years Later,' pp. 286-290 in Donn Welton (ed.), Body and Flesh: A Philosophical Reader, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1998

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Elizabeth Grosz, 'Lived Bodies: Phenomenology and the Flesh,' pp. 86-111 in Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1994

James Morley, 'Inspiration and Expiration: Yoga Practice through Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of the Body,' Philosophy East & West 51(1): 73-82, January 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-08-28
Preparation for this class Bodily Techniques & Habitus
REQUIRED READINGS
Marcel Mauss, 'Techniques of the Body,' Economy and Society 2(1): 70-88, February 1973

Pierre Bourdieu, 'Structures, Habitus, Practices,' pp. 52-65 in The Logic of Practice (translated by Richard Nice), Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1980

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Pierre Bourdieu, 'Appendix—The Kabyle House or the World Reversed,' pp. 271-283 in The Logic of Practice (translated by Richard Nice), Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1980

2002-08-30
Preparation for this class From Grotesque to Civilized Bodies
REQUIRED READINGS
Mikhail Bakhtin (transl. Helene Iswolsky), 'The Grotesque Image of the Body and Its Sources,' pp. 315-325 in Rabelais and his World, Cambridge: The M.I.T. Press, 1968

Norbert Elias (transl. Edmund Jephcott), 'Part Two: Civilization as a Specific Transformation of Human Behavior,' pp. 42-67 and 168-178 in The Civilizing Process: The History of Manners and State Formation and Civilization, Oxford: Blackwell, 1994 [1939]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Roy Porter, 'The Body Grotesque and Monstrous,' pp. 35-62 in Bodies Politic: Disease, Death and Doctors in Britain, 1650-1900, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001

Alain Corbin, 'The Stench of the Poor,' pp. 142-160 in The Foul and the Fragrant: Odor and the French Social Imagination, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1986

2002-09-02 WEEK THREE
Note LABOR DAY HOLIDAY
NO CLASS

2002-09-04
Preparation for this class Body Doubles: Physical and Social
REQUIRED READINGS
Filippo & Caroline Osella, 'Articulation of Physical and Social Bodies in Kerala,' Contributions to Indian Sociology (n.s.) 30(1): 37-68, 1996

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Paul Stoller, 'The Sorcerer's Body,' pp. 4-23 in Sensuous Scholarship, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997
Due for this class DUE TODAY - Bibliographic Survey Response
One page short response papers to any two of the bibliographic surveys posted on the readings for the first class (August 21) are due in-class today.

2002-09-06
Preparation for this class Discipline & Biopower
REQUIRED READINGS
Michel Foucault, 'The Body of the Condemned,' pp. 3-31 in Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, New York: Vintage Books, 1991 [1975]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Michel Foucault (transl. Robert Hurley), 'Part Four: The Deployment of Sexuality—I Objective,' pp. 81-92 in The History of Sexuality, Volume 1: An Introduction, New York: Vintage Books, 1990 [1978]

2002-09-09 WEEK FOUR
Preparation for this class The Social Skin
REQUIRED READINGS
Terence S. Turner, 'The Social Skin,' pp. 112-140 in Jeremy Cherfas & Roger Lewin (eds.), Not Work Alone: A Cross-Cultural View of Activities Superfluous to Survival, Beverly Hills: Sage Publications, 1980

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Susan Bordo, '"Material Girl:" The Effacements of Postmodern Culture,' pp. 245-275 in Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture and the Body, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993 [netLibrary Online]
Note 1st Essay Guidelines
Guidelines for the First Essay Assignment will be posted today; the essay is due in class two weeks from today.

2002-09-11
Preparation for this class Body Modification
REQUIRED READINGS
Paul Bohannan, 'Beauty and Scarification amongst the Tiv,' Man 129: 117-121, September 1956 [JSTOR Online]

Paul Sweetman, 'Only Skin Deep? Tattooing, Piercing and the Transgressive Body,' pp. 165-187 in Michele Aaron (ed.), The Body's Perilous Pleasures: Dangerous Desires and Contemporary Culture, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1999

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Anne Balsamo, 'On the Cutting Edge: Cosmetic Surgery and the Technological Production of the Gendered Body,' Camera Obscura 28: 206-237, 1992

Kathy Davis, '"My Body is My Art:" Cosmetic Surgery as Feminist Utopia?' pp. 168-181 in Kathy Davis (ed.), Embodied Practices: Feminist Perspectives on the Body, London: Sage, 1997

Robert Ayers, 'Serene and Happy and Distant: An Interview with Orlan,' pp. 171-184 in Mike Featherstone (ed.), Body Modification, London: Sage Publications, 2000

2002-09-13
Activity during this class VIDEO: A Question of Color
A Question of Color, Kathe Sandler, 1993 (56 minutes) [UL NonPrint 65-0V4079]

2002-09-16 WEEK FIVE
Preparation for this class Racial Bodies
REQUIRED READINGS
Walter Johnson, 'Reading Bodies and Marking Race,' pp. 135-161 in Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1999

SUPPLEMENTARY READING
Anne Fausto-Sterling, 'Gender, Race, and Nation: The Comparative Anatomy of "Hottentot" Women in Europe, 1815-1817,' pp. 19-48 in Jennifer Terry & Jacqueline Urla, Deviant Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Difference in Science and Popular Culture, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995 [netLibrary Online]

2002-09-18
Preparation for this class Ethnic Bodies
REQUIRED READINGS
Sander L. Gilman, 'The Jew's Body: Thoughts on Jewish Physical Difference,' pp. 60-73 in Norman L. Kleebat (ed.), Too Jewish? Challenging Traditional Identities, New York: The Jewish Museum, 1996

Uli Linke, 'Blood, Race, Nation,' pp. 115-151 in German Bodies: Race and Representation after Hitler, New York: Routledge, 1999

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Sander L. Gilman, 'The Racial Nose,' pp. 85-118 in Making the Body Beautiful: A Cultural History of Aesthetic History, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999

Elizabeth Haiken, 'The Michael Jackson Factor: Race, Ethnicity, and Cosmetic Surgery,' pp. 175-227 in Venus Envy: A History of Cosmetic Surgery, Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997

2002-09-20
Preparation for this class Gender & Masculinities
REQUIRED READINGS
Joseph Alter, 'The Discipline of the Wrestler's body,' pp. 90-135 in The Wrestler's Body: Identity and Ideology in Northern India, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992 [University of California e-editions Online]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Frits Staal, 'Indian Bodies,' pp. 59-102 in Thomas P. Kasulia, Roger T. Ames, and Wimal Dissanayake (eds.), Self as Body in Asian Theory and Practice, Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993

2002-09-23 WEEK SIX
Preparation for this class Gender & Feminities
REQUIRED READINGS
Thomas Laqueur, 'New Science, One Flesh,' pp. 63-113 and 262-275 in Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Serena Nanda, 'Hjiras as Neither Man nor Woman,' pp. 13-23 in Neither Man Nor Woman: The Hjiras of India, Belmont: Wadsworth Publlishing Company, 1990

Londa Schiebinger, 'Skeletons in the Closet: The First Illustrations of the Female Skeleton in Eighteenth-Century Anatomy,' Representations, No. 14: 42-82. The Making of the Modern Body: Sexuality and Society in the Nineteenth Century, Spring 1986 [JSTOR Online]
Due for this class 1st Essay Due
The First Essay Assignment is due today in class.

2002-09-25
Preparation for this class Gendered Subjectivities & Slasher Films
REQUIRED READINGS
Carol J. Clover, 'Her Body, Himself: Gender in Slasher Film,' Representations 20. Special Issue: Misogyny, Misandry, and Misanthropy, pp. 187-228, Fall 1987 [JSTOR Online]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Anne Allison, 'Cutting the Fringes: Pubic Hair at the Margins of Japanese Censorship Laws,' pp. 195-217 in Alf Hiltebeitel and Barbara D. Miller, Hair: Its Power and Meaning in Asian Cultures, Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998 [netLibrary Online]

2002-09-27
Preparation for this class Technology and the Body
REQUIRED READINGS
Carolyn Thomas de la Peña, 'Designing the Electric Body: Sexuality, Masculinity and the Electric Belt in America, 1880-1920,' pp. 275-289 in Technology and the Body. A special issue of Journal of Design History 14(4), 2001

Adrienne Berney, 'Streamlining Breasts: The Exaltation of Form and Disguise of Function in 1930s' Ideals,' pp. 327-342 in Technology and the Body. A special issue of Journal of Design History 14(4), 2001

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Rachel P. Maines, '"Inviting the Juices Downward,"' pp. 67-110 in The Technology of the Orgasm: "Hysteria," the Vibrator, and Women's Sexual Satisfaction, Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999

2002-09-30 WEEK SEVEN
Preparation for this class Evolution of Barbie, Mickey Mouse, & Wonder Woman
REQUIRED READINGS
M. G. Lord, 'A Toy is Born,' pp. 18-43 in Forever Barbie: The Unauthorized Biography of a Real Doll, New York: William Morrow & Company, 1994

Jacqueline Urla and Alan C. Swedlund, 'The Anthropometry of Barbie: Unsettling Ideals of the Feminine Body in Popular Culture,' pp. 277-313 in Jennifer Terry and Jacqueline Urla, Deviant Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Difference in Science and Popular Culture, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995 [netLibrary Online]

Stephan Jay Gould, 'A Biological Homage to Mickey Mouse,' pp. 95-107 in The Panda's Thumb: More Reflections in Natural History, New York: Norton, 1991 [1980]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Les Daniels and Chip Kidd, 'The Doctor' and 'The Amazon,' pp. 10-89 in Wonder Woman: The Life and Times of the Amazon Princess: The Complete History, San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2000 [Undergratuate Library Book Reserves]

2002-10-02
Activity during this class VIDEO: Freaks
Freaks, Tod Browning, 1986 [1932], 66 minutes [UL NonPrint 65-V1253]

2002-10-04
Preparation for this class Disability Studies & Embodiment
REQUIRED READINGS
Sharon L. Snyder and David T. Mitchell, 'Re-engaging the Body: Disability Studies and the Resistance to Embodiment,' Public Culture 13(3): 367-389, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

Veena Das and Renu Addlakha, 'Disability and Domestic Citizenship: Voice, Gender, and the Making of the Subject,' Public Culture 13(3): 511-531, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

Alexa Wright, 'I,' Public Culture 13(3): 506-510, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

Wu Hung, 'Photographing Deformity: Liu Zheng and His Photo Series "My Countrymen,"' Public Culture 13(3): 399-427, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Carol A. Breckenridge and Candace Vogler, 'The Critical Limits of Embodiment: Disability's Criticism,' Public Culture 13(3): 349-357, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

George Taleporos and Marita McCabe, 'Body Image and Physical Disability—Personal Perspectives,' Social Science and Medicine 54(6): 971-980, 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

C. Nadia Seremetakis, 'Toxic Beauties: Medicine, Information, and Body Consumption in Transnational Europe,' Social Text 68, Vol. 19, No. 3: 115-129, Fall 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

Lisa Diedrich, 'Breaking Down: A Phenomenology of Disability,' Literature and Medicine 20(2): 209-230, Fall 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-10-07 WEEK EIGHT
Preparation for this class Tortured Bodies
REQUIRED READINGS
Alphonso Lingis, 'A Doctor in Havana,' pp. 33-40 in Abuses, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994 [netLibrary Online]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Renato Martinez, 'On the Semiotics of Torture: The Case of the Disappeared in Chile,' pp. 85-103 in Catherine B. Burroughs and Jeffrey David Ehrenreich (eds.), Reading the Social Body, Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1993 [netLibrary Online]

2002-10-09
Preparation for this class Dead Bodies
REQUIRED READINGS
Jonathan Parry, 'The End of the Body,' pp. 490-517 in Michel Feher, Ramona Naddaff, & Nadia Tazi (eds.), Fragments for a History of the Human Body, Part Two, New York: Zone, 1989

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Jonathan Parry, 'The Last Sacrifice' & 'Ghosts into Ancestors,' pp. 151-194 and 211-215 in Death in Banaras, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994

2002-10-11
Preparation for this class Living-Dead Bodies
REQUIRED READINGS
Paul Rabinow, 'Severing the Ties: Fragmentation and Dignity in Late Modernity,' pp. 129-152 in Essays on the Anthropology of Reason, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Paul Rabinow, 'Artificiality and Enlightenment: From Sociobiology to Biosociality,' pp. 91-111 in Essays on the Anthropology of Reason, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996

2002-10-14 WEEK NINE
Preparation for this class Charming Cadavers
REQUIRED READINGS
Liz Wilson, '"Like a Boil with Nine Openings:" Buddhist Constructions of the Body and Their South Asian Milieu,' pp. 41-76 in Charming Cadavers: Horrific Figurations of the Feminine in Indian Buddhist Hagiographic Literature, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1996

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Liz Wilson, 'Introduction,' pp. 1-14 in Charming Cadavers: Horrific Figurations of the Feminine in Indian Buddhist Hagiographic Literature, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1996

2002-10-16
Preparation for this class Circulating Bodies
REQUIRED READINGS
Richard Sennett, 'Moving Bodies,' pp. 255-281 in Flesh and Stone: The Body and The City in Western Civilization, New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1994

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Dennis B. McGilvray, Symbolic Heat: Gender, Health & Worship among the Tamils of South India and Sri Lanka, Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd. in association with Boulder: University of Colorado Museum, 1998 [Undergraduate Library Book Reserve]

2002-10-18
Note FALL BREAK
NO CLASS.

2002-10-21 WEEK TEN
Preparation for this class Cyborg Bodies
REQUIRED READINGS
Donna Haraway, 'A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century,' pp. 149-181 in Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature, New York: Routledge, 1991 http://www.stanford.edu/dept/HPS/Haraway/CyborgManifesto.html

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Ingrid Bartsch, Carolyn DiPalma, and Laura Sells, 'Witnessing the Postmodern Jeremiad: (Mis)Understanding Donna Haraway's Method of Inquiry,' Configurations 9(1): 127-164, Winter 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]
Due for this class Draft of Final Term Paper
A preliminary draft of the Final Term Paper is due in class today.

2002-10-23
Preparation for this class Artificial Life
REQUIRED READINGS
Stefan Helmreich, 'Inside and Outside the Looking-Glass Worlds of Artificial Life,' pp. 106-179 in Silicon Second Nature: Culturing Artificial Life in a Digital World, University of California Press, 1998

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Stefan Helmreich, 'Introduction,' pp. 3-27 in Silicon Second Nature: Culturing Artificial Life in a Digital World, University of California Press, 1998
Activity during this class 2nd Essay Guidelines
Guidelines on writing the Second Essay Assignment, due in two weeks, will be posted today.

2002-10-25
Preparation for this class Neuromancer (1)
REQUIRED READINGS
William Gibson, pp. 1-39 in Neuromancer, New York: Ace Books, 1984

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Donna Haraway, 'The Promises of Monsters: A Regenerative Politics for Inappropriate/d Others,' pp. 295-337 in Lawrence Grossberg, Cary Nelson & Paula A. Treichler (eds.), Cultural Studies, New York: Routledge, 1992 http://www.stanford.edu/dept/HPS/Haraway/monsters.html

2002-10-28 WEEK ELEVEN
Preparation for this class Neuromancer (2)
REQUIRED READINGS
William Gibson, pp. 41-98 in Neuromancer, New York: Ace Books, 1984

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Mike Featherstone and Roger Burrows, 'Cultures of Technological Embodiment: An Introduction,' pp. 1-19 in Mike Featherstone and Roger Burrows (eds.), Cyberspace/Cyberbodies/Cyberpunk: Cultures of Technological Embodiment, London: Sage Publications, 1995

2002-10-30
Preparation for this class Neuromancer (3)
REQUIRED READINGS
William Gibson, pp. 99-156 in Neuromancer, New York: Act Books, 1984

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Nigel Clark, 'Rear-View Mirrorshades: The Recursive Generation of the Cyberbody,' pp. 113-133 in Mike Featherstone and Roger Burrows (eds.), Cyberspace/Cyberbodies/Cyberpunk: Cultures of Technological Embodiment, London: Sage Publications, 1995

2002-11-01
Preparation for this class Neuromancer (4)
REQUIRED READINGS
William Gibson, pp. 157-199 in Neuromancer, New York: Ace Books, 1984

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Michael Jackson, 'Familiar and Foreign Bodies: A Phenomenological Exploration of the Human-Technology Interface,' Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute (new series) 8(2): 333-346, June 2002 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-11-04 WEEK TWELVE
Preparation for this class Neuromancer (5)
REQUIRED READINGS
William Gibson, pp. 201-240 in Neuromancer, New York: Ace Books, 1984

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Ron Eglash, 'Race, Sex, and Nerds: From Black Geeks to Asian American Hipsters,' Social Text 71, Vol. 20, No. 2: 49-64, Summer 2002 [Electronic Journals Online]

2002-11-06
Preparation for this class Neuromancer (6)
REQUIRED READINGS
William Gibson, pp. 241-271 in Neuromancer, New York: Ace Books, 1984

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Tony Myers, 'The Postmodern Imaginary in William Gibson's Neuromancer,' Modern Fiction Studies 47(4): 887-909, Winter 2001 [Electronic Journals Online]

E. L. McCallum, 'Mapping the Real in Cyberfiction,' Poetics Today 21(2): 349-377, Summer 2000 [Electronic Journals Online]

Dominic Idier, 'Science Fiction and Technology Scenarios: Comparing Asimov's Robots and Gibson's Cyberspace,' Technology in Society 22(2): 255-272, April 2000 [Electronic Journals Online]
Due for this class 2nd Essay Assignment
The Second Essay Assignment is due today in class.

2002-11-08
Preparation for this class Japanese Anime & the Monstrous Adolescent
REQUIRED READINGS
Susan J. Napier, 'Akira and Ranma 1/2: The Monstrous Adolescent,' pp. 39-62 in Anime from Akira to Princess Mononoke: Experiencing Contemporary Japanese Animation, Palgrave, 2001
Activity during this class VIDEO SELECTIONS: Akira & Ranma 1/2
Akira and Ranma 1/2 [selected clips].

2002-11-11 WEEK THIRTEEN
Preparation for this class Bodies & Nations: Gandhi's Body
REQUIRED READINGS
Joseph Alter, 'Gandhi's Body, Gandhi's Truth,' pp. 3-27 in Gandhi's Body: Sex, Diet, and the Politics of Nationalism, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Joseph Alter, 'Somatic Nationalism: Gama the Great, Another Heroic Indian,' pp. 113-145 in Gandhi's Body: Sex, Diet, and the Politics of Nationalism, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000

2002-11-13
Preparation for this class Bodies & Nations: Mother Tamil
REQUIRED READINGS
'Sumathi Ramaswamy, 'Chapter One - 'Introduction: Language in History and Modernity,' pp. 1-9; Figures 1 through 12; 'Chapter Three - Feminizing Language: Tamil as Goddess, Mother, and Maiden,' pp. 79-134 in Passions of the Tongue: Language Devotion in Tamil India, 1891-1970, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997 [netLibrary Online; also available through University of California E-Editions]

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
'Sumathi Ramaswamy, 'Chapter Two - One Language, Many Imaginings,' pp. 22-78 in Passions of the Tongue: Language Devotion in Tamil India, 1891-1970, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997 [netLibrary Online; also available through University of California e-Editions]

2002-11-15
Preparation for this class Bodies & Nations: Cinematic Bodies
REQUIRED READINGS
Preminda Jacob, 'From Co-star to Deity: Popular Representations of Jayalalitha Jayaram,' pp. 140-165 in Vidya Dehejia, Representing the Body: Gender Issues in Indian Art, New Delhi: Kali for Women, 1997

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
M. S. S. Pandian, The Image Trap: M G Ramachandran in Film and Politics, New Delhi: Sage Publications, 1992 [Undergraduate Library Book Reserve]
Activity during this class VIDEO: Kasthuri
Kasthuri: A Documentary, Richard Breyer, 1993 [UL NonPrint 65-V7971]

2002-11-18 WEEK FOURTEEN
Preparation for this class Individual & National Bodies (1)
REQUIRED READINGS
Urvashi Butalia, pp. 1-51 in The Other Side of Silence: Voices from the Partition of India, Durham: Duke University Press, 2000

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Ritu Menon and Kamla Bhasin, 'Her Body and Her Being: Of Widows and Abducted Women in Post-Partition India,' pp. 58-81 in Margaret Jolly and Kalpana Ram (eds.), Borders of Being: Citizenship, Fertility, and Sexuality in Asia and the Pacific, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001

2002-11-20
Preparation for this class Individual & National Bodies (2)
REQUIRED READINGS
Butalia, pp. 53-83 in The Other Side of Silence

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS

Saadat Hasan Manto, 'Toba Tek Singh,' pp. 25-31 in Salman Rushdie and Elizabeth West (eds.), Mirrorwork: 50 Years of Indian Writing 1947-1997, New York: Henry Holt & Company, 1997

2002-11-22
Preparation for this class Individual & National Bodies (3)
REQUIRED READINGS
Butalia, pp. 85-136 in The Other Side of Silence

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Rajinder Singh Bedi, 'Lajwanti,' pp. 177-189 in Mushirul Hasan (ed.), India Partitioned: The Other Face of Freedom, Volume I, New Delhi: Roli Books, 1995

Mumtaz Mufti, 'An Impenetrable Darkness,' pp. 200-214 in Mushirul Hasan (ed.), India Partitioned: The Other Face of Freedom, Volume I, New Delhi: Roli Books, 1995

2002-11-25 WEEK FIFTEEN
Preparation for this class Individual & National Bodies (4)
REQUIRED READINGS
Butalia, pp. 137-194 in The Other Side of Silence

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Gyanendra Pandey, 'The Requirements of a History of Partition,' pp. 58-65 in Remembering Partition: Violence, Nationalism and History in India, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001

2002-11-27
Note THANKSGIVING RECESS
NO CLASS.

2002-12-02 WEEK SIXTEEN
Preparation for this class Individual & National Bodies (5)
REQUIRED READINGS
Butalia, pp. 195-232 in The Other Side of Silence

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Babsi Sidhwa, Ice-Candy-Man, London: Heinemann, 1988

2002-12-04
Preparation for this class Individual & National Bodies (6)
REQUIRED READINGS
Butalia, pp. 233-293 in The Other Side of Silence

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS
Shauna Singh Baldwin, What the Body Remembers, New York: Doubleday, 1999

2002-12-06
Note Final Term Paper Due
The Final Term Paper for the course is due today, at my office, 409C, Alumni Building. In my absence, the paper can be left in in the Anthropology Department office, 301 Alumni Building.

2002-12-16 WEEKS SEVENTEEN & EIGHTEEN
Activity during this class FINAL EXAMINATION
The Final Examination for ANTH 173 will take place Monday, December 16, at 2:00 pm.
Course Assignments:

Class participation: 25%
1st short essay: 15%
2nd short essay: 15%
Final term paper: 30%
Final examination: 15%

  • Class Participation
    In addition to general participation on a daily basis, each student is responsible for serving as one of several discussion leaders for any four non-consecutive weeks of the course. A 'week,' for this purpose, will be defined as three classes extending from Monday to Friday. Discussion leaders for a particular week should sign up in class by Friday of the preceding week. Discussion leaders are encouraged to confer with one another, either in person or through e-mail, about the respective week's readings. They should present a brief collaborative five to (at most) ten minute summary of the required (and perhaps, some supplementary) readings at the start of each class. Each discussion leader should submit to me an individual summary (one to two pages) of the themes covered in the readings for that week, and their relation to the broader context of the course. Additionally, every student should present to me, by September 4, a one to two page reaction to any two of the eight bibliographic surveys listed on the readings for the first class. Use these brief writing assignments as opportunities to experiment with possible topics for the short essay, and longer term paper, writing assignments. Be as specific as possible in setting forth themes that can be developed into essay topics. These brief summaries will not be graded, but will be evaluated with respect to the feasibility of developing them into broader essay topics. Class participation will comprise 25% of the grade for the course.
  • 1st Short Essay Assignment
    Guidelines for the first short essay will be posted on September 9; the essay will be due in class two weeks later, on September 23. The essay is to be 4-5 pages in length, and will comprise 15% of the grade for the course.
  • 2nd Short Essay Assignment
    Guidelines for the second short essay will be posted on October 23; the essay will be due in class two weeks later, on November 6. The essay is to be 5-6 pages in length, and will comprise 15% of the grade for the course.
  • Final Term Paper
    The final term paper should relate primary sources to some of the dominant themes discussed in the course, on constructs of embodiment. It should be 12-20 pages in length, and will comprise 30% of the grade for the course. A preliminary outline of the final term paper—4-5 pages in length—must be submitted to me by October 21st. The preliminary outline will not be graded, but a grade will be deducted for failure to turn in an outline by this date. These preliminary drafts will provide the basis for group and individual discussion of the various research projects being carried out by participants in this course. The final draft of the term paper should be submitted to my office by December 6.
  • Final Examination
    The final examination will be open book/open notes and will take place on Monday, December 16 at 2:00 pm. It will comprise 15% of the grade for the course.

This page last updated December 5, 2002

Copyright ©2002 by Gary J. Hausman